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  1. #1
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    Default How have you stopped a dog attack?

    Reading some of the news articles from the Cane puppy thread makes me think. How on earth can you defend yourself from a dog attack (by ANY breed).

    I live in a neighborhood with a lot of dogs in chain link fences that they are certainly capable of jumping over if they wanted. Dogs of all breeds that often make me nervous. I usually don't walk my dogs because of that (I take them to a park or such).

    Without getting into breeds, have you ever been attacked? What did you do? What would you do differently?



  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2LaZ2race View Post
    Reading some of the news articles from the Cane puppy thread makes me think. How on earth can you defend yourself from a dog attack (by ANY breed).

    I live in a neighborhood with a lot of dogs in chain link fences that they are certainly capable of jumping over if they wanted. Dogs of all breeds that often make me nervous. I usually don't walk my dogs because of that (I take them to a park or such).

    Without getting into breeds, have you ever been attacked? What did you do? What would you do differently?
    I have not been really attacked. Some dogs have followed me while I walked my dogs, but telling them no or to go home has worked. The closest call was once when I spent some time in Australia. I was jogging in aneighborhood, and 2 pit bull type dogs followed me down the street for about a block. They got closer, and I was planning my escape route/thinking about jumping on a car when one started nipping my heels. I turned and yelled at them ""go hom" "no", etc and they backed off. Very scary!

    If I was worried about dogs in my neighborhood, and I was at one time and read up on this, I'd carry a walking stick and anti-dog spray.



  3. #3
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    Cattle Prod, air horn, yelling "go home" or "No", last resort kicking, but physically getting them away from you could result in you being a target. If you see loose dogs, call animal control every time.

    Where I used to live the AC police officer tried to find out where the animal belonged, and gave one chance on roaming animals. Then the owner couldn't say they didn't know the dog roamed. Most people took that seriously. However, some jurisdictions have no AC, or are lax on enforcement.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    My family was attacked by a neighbor's rottweiler- and I'm only mentioning the breed because he was gigantic and a serious match for my husband and myself. It was a real freak thing- we were putting up some fence and my husband just happened to be wearing armored motorcycle gloves when it happened.

    Our dogs were loose in our yard with us and the rottweiler from across the street who always lived on a chain - and I knew only outside the ring of his chain from a few times I'd dog sat for them- broke loose and came over to fight. Our dogs were a pitbull and a boxer. He got the boxer down on his back and my husband grabbed the pitbull- I straddled the rott's back and grabbed his collar and pulled him up and off my boxer. I was terrified because it took a lot of strength and I was afraid he might turn on me at any second- at that point he was only interested in fighting dogs. my husband was able to drag the boxer out from under him and get both of our dogs into our house. I held on to the rotweiler until husband got in the house with our dogs- and then I thought I had to let him go fast before he got twisted around and went for me. The second I let him loose I regretted it- because there was my two year old son toddling across the yard- I thought he was in the house- but he must have come out at some point- the rotweiler went straight across the yard straight for my son with what I can best describe here as "A Totillas trot" when he got to my son- face to face- he just paused midstride and changed his mind... It was as if he was thinking, "nah- you aren't the one I want to kill today." and he turned toward the house looking for our dogs- I was flying as fast as I could run and scooped up my son and ran for the bed of the truck- just thinking to get higher- just as my husband was coming back out of the house- I tried to yell to him to get back inside- but the dog was already there and coming at him- my husband grabbed the closest thing- a yellow metal tonka dump truck- and was just smashing that truck into the reared up dog's face with prizefighter punches- and not really slowing him down much. He did wind up with a few pressure point near puncture bruises- but as I said- he happened to be wearing armored motorcycle gloves when it happened. He managed to get back in the house and the dog started CIRCLING our house looking for a way in!!

    The neighbor did do the right thing and put the dog down after that because my husband suggested it should be done (yes he had to ask) - but then after we had to suffer years of country feud over it. At least that was all... I still get chills when I think of that raging dog flipping a coin in his mind if he should take off my son's face or not.



  5. #5
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    Jun. 20, 2008
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    Default

    I've only had one close call when I was walking my dog.. there is this one house that would chain their big dog in the back- and he has a pretty intimidating bark - definite watchdog material. The sidewalk is on the opposite side of that house so I'm now a couple houses down from that house and my pooch is doing her business when the dog apparently busted out of the house making a beeline for my dog..fortunately she had a dog coat on so he couldn't really get to her which gave me time to scoop her up.. I just yelled NO, GO Away, NO but didn't really move too much.. the owner had run across the street apologizing profusely. Fortunately no injuries but I keep a watchful eye on that house when I go by.

    A friend of mine was walking her dogs and was passing this house where 2 miniature poodles were playing in their front yard w/ owner and kids when some dog got out of his yard and made a beeline for the poodles.. killed one pretty instantly and went on to the 2nd one.. don't know how the owner got the dog off his other dog but he got his arm broken in the process..

    In both these situations - none of the dogs were provoking the attacking dog in any way..no barking.. not threatening their turf - these dogs made a beeline right for them.



  6. #6
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    Jul. 13, 2008
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    Any discussion of serious attacks has to take breed into account. Otherwise, it's just playing make-believe. There are dog attacks that you simply have little chance of stopping alone, without serious injury. And there are only a tiny, tiny handful of breeds that do these on a regular basis. The best way to counter these attacks is to ban the breeds.

    For the normal dog breeds, when you come across one with a screw loose or whose owners have let them become monsters? These generally don't immediately bite, but pull back initially and work up the nerve to make contact. I recommend starting the fight instead of waiting patently for Born Free to find his mojo. If a loose dog runs at my dog, I get between then and get tall and glare at the loose dog, staring it in the eye and doing my very best Man Voice "Go away." Big challenge will back off a a normal dog who hasn't gotten his nerve up.



  7. #7
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    Mar. 18, 2012
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    Plainandtall, that's horrifying!



  8. #8
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    A good, powerful spray bottle filled with about 70% Vinegar and 30% water. That mixture will back off most dogs and even the majority of big cats. Aim for the eyes and don't stop spraying.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by 2LaZ2race View Post
    ...
    Without getting into breeds, have you ever been attacked? What did you do? What would you do differently?
    Almost always a sharp "NO, GO HOME!!!" will send loose dogs away. I even scared one sensitive soul so much that he jumped back in his yard!

    I have not been attacked, but my dog was while I was out on a walk with him and my little one. Looking back, about the only thing I would have done differently was carry mace (which I have now!) and sprayed the dog in the eyes.

    The loose bulldog charged and grabbed my dog at the shoulder and kept trying to pull my dog to the ground. The attack was unprovoked. I had enough time to see the loose dog before he charged. Screaming and kicking the bulldog did nothing; hammer punching the bulldog right on top of his head finally made him let go; but then he charged and grabbed my dog at the shoulder again; hammer punching his head made him let go; I don't remember how many times this happened until we were able to back away slowly. Come to find out, the bulldog has attacked another dog earlier in the week.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    Any discussion of serious attacks has to take breed into account. Otherwise, it's just playing make-believe. There are dog attacks that you simply have little chance of stopping alone, without serious injury. And there are only a tiny, tiny handful of breeds that do these on a regular basis. The best way to counter these attacks is to ban the breeds.

    For the normal dog breeds, when you come across one with a screw loose or whose owners have let them become monsters? These generally don't immediately bite, but pull back initially and work up the nerve to make contact. I recommend starting the fight instead of waiting patently for Born Free to find his mojo. If a loose dog runs at my dog, I get between then and get tall and glare at the loose dog, staring it in the eye and doing my very best Man Voice "Go away." Big challenge will back off a a normal dog who hasn't gotten his nerve up.
    So I know you don't like bully breeds, but the scariest story on here (to me) is the Rottie story.. should they be banned as well? (honest question).



  11. #11
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    Sep. 24, 2007
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    No IMO, and why because breed bans do not work as many nations and cities are finding out. Dangerous dog laws are much more appropriate. I also like the approach of Calgary.

    http://btoellner.typepad.com/kcdogbl...nt-on-bsl.html



  12. #12
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    Default

    I've been bitten by dogs but never "attacked". Mostly it was a charge and bite and back off. But one time I was walking my schip puppies and I heard a huffing noise behind me. I turned around and the neighbor's dogs were out (again) and charging toward my puppies with deadly intent, not even barking or growling. I did the helicopter thing trying to grab them both and pick them up and got them just in time (they were about 3 feet from me then). I turned and glared at them and yelled (something!) in my meanest voice. They both stopped and ran back home. Thankfully they were only after puppy meat. I had reported them before but this time they finally listed to AC and one dog disappeared and one dog was forever more behind his fence. They were both purebreds, one a border collie (the one that vanished) and the other a chow. the worst dog bite I got was from a freaky GSD that had a major screw loose. She belonged to my friend and I always made sure the mad dog was tied up before I came out!
    Every mighty oak was once a nut that stood its ground.

    Proud Closet Canterer! Member Riders with Fibromyalgia clique.



  13. #13
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    Almost always the best thing to protect yourself from an attack (dog or human!) is to exude confidence. Confidence is intimidating, even more so when paired with a sharp deep "NO SIR! Baaad dog!" And learn how to read body language, it's pretty easy to learn to tell which dogs just run the fence because they've learned to exercise themselves by making people leave and those who are truly aggressive.

    Btw, your dog is at higher risk at a dog park than on a leash walking past fenced dogs.
    You can't fix stupid.... but you can breed it!



  14. #14
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    Feb. 9, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plainandtall View Post
    My family was attacked by a neighbor's rottweiler- and I'm only mentioning the breed because he was gigantic and a serious match for my husband and myself. It was a real freak thing- we were putting up some fence and my husband just happened to be wearing armored motorcycle gloves when it happened.

    Our dogs were loose in our yard with us and the rottweiler from across the street who always lived on a chain - and I knew only outside the ring of his chain from a few times I'd dog sat for them- broke loose and came over to fight. Our dogs were a pitbull and a boxer. He got the boxer down on his back and my husband grabbed the pitbull- I straddled the rott's back and grabbed his collar and pulled him up and off my boxer. I was terrified because it took a lot of strength and I was afraid he might turn on me at any second- at that point he was only interested in fighting dogs. my husband was able to drag the boxer out from under him and get both of our dogs into our house. I held on to the rotweiler until husband got in the house with our dogs- and then I thought I had to let him go fast before he got twisted around and went for me. The second I let him loose I regretted it- because there was my two year old son toddling across the yard- I thought he was in the house- but he must have come out at some point- the rotweiler went straight across the yard straight for my son with what I can best describe here as "A Totillas trot" when he got to my son- face to face- he just paused midstride and changed his mind... It was as if he was thinking, "nah- you aren't the one I want to kill today." and he turned toward the house looking for our dogs- I was flying as fast as I could run and scooped up my son and ran for the bed of the truck- just thinking to get higher- just as my husband was coming back out of the house- I tried to yell to him to get back inside- but the dog was already there and coming at him- my husband grabbed the closest thing- a yellow metal tonka dump truck- and was just smashing that truck into the reared up dog's face with prizefighter punches- and not really slowing him down much. He did wind up with a few pressure point near puncture bruises- but as I said- he happened to be wearing armored motorcycle gloves when it happened. He managed to get back in the house and the dog started CIRCLING our house looking for a way in!!

    The neighbor did do the right thing and put the dog down after that because my husband suggested it should be done (yes he had to ask) - but then after we had to suffer years of country feud over it. At least that was all... I still get chills when I think of that raging dog flipping a coin in his mind if he should take off my son's face or not.

    That is an utterly horrific story: so glad you were all OK.

    And sobering: while the idea of a spray bottle with vinegar is quite good, who really has the time to measure 70% vinegar into 30% water - assuming one found the spray bottle handy - or is likely to be carrying a cattle prod around all the time. Most of the time, these are unprovoked, unexpected and very rapid attacks.

    I have *heard* - and don't slay me for this, as it's purely hearsay - that if you're attacked by a dog the survival approach is to grab each jaw and break them apart, rendering them useless.



  15. #15
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    The water/vinegar is obviously for when you are expecting trouble, not something you would do during an attack. The one time I was there when two young male Malamutes went after each other was to reach in and grab the aggressor by the testicles and gave em a good yank. That took the starch out of him in a hurry enabling me to get a hold on his collar. Of course neither dog was trying to attack me, only each other.



  16. #16
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    I have heard that the best way to interrupt a fight is to cover the aggressors eyes with whatever you can find. Fighting back, yelling, kicking just fuels the adrenaline but supposedly covering their eyes causes them to stop at least for a second which might be enough to reset his brain. That would probably mean taking off your shirt unless you are carrying a jacket or something which is awkward but better than dying I guess.



  17. #17
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    Jul. 5, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by TheHotSensitiveType View Post
    Almost always a sharp "NO, GO HOME!!!" will send loose dogs away.
    Agreed, but when this fails, the results could be very bad. I've had to run off loose dogs from our property over the years, and it's worked great in every case but one. Most dogs are not at all committed to staying on territory they know is not theirs, especially if they're not really after anything (like livestock or the resident dog).

    However, I nearly got attacked once doing this, and I was home alone at the time. Went outside to run the dog off and instead of running, it stared me in the eye and began advancing slowly and stiffly while growling. I had to back up slowly to get to the door and luckily got back inside before it leaped at me. The dog was HUGE.

    We found out later it was owned by some trashy renters down the road when they came by looking for it. They claimed it was a great dane / mastiff mix. That fit the size but not the behavior; I feel sure there was a big dose of thug-style pit bull in it. The dog mysteriously disappeared shortly after this incident occurred and was never seen again.



  18. #18
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    My ability to yell in a fierce manner has been my best defense against both horses and dogs who have or have tried to bite me. I am *really* loud. In my experience (bit in the thigh by GSD, arm by horse) it worked well. Both animals knew they were being naughty though. The horse was in a panic-freak out and just wanted to get away, but it did work to "reset" the brain.

    Just don't ever run away if there is a chance they can catch you.

    Next thing is to gouge out the eyeball. Laurierace, I think you are on the right track, but based on taking bites in a suit or sleeves, I don't think you would be able to get your shirt off with a big dog using you as a chew toy, unless you are incredibly strong/balanced. You could maybe just cover the eyes with your hand. A strong dog can really thrash you around and you don't want to go down if you can avoid it, and once you are on the ground you wouldn't want to be messing with a shirt either, you would expose your stomach too much.

    I vote gouge out the eyeballs.

    If dogs are fighting, and I didn't have a handy mixture of whatever I would shoot them in the face with a high power hose trying to drown them out. Most of the time when you grab a dog from behind it will whip around and bite whatever the new threat is.

    Just my opinion/experience.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

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  19. #19
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    Wanted to add, when I lived in town, there were so many close calls with dogs coming after my dogs on leashed walks that I was thinking about getting bear spray. Just not sure what the cops would say. Only one who ever bit my dog (in the face) was a springer spaniel. My yell scared it off. Somehow I'm sure my leashed Doberman would have been blamed though.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  20. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoDQhere View Post
    The one time I was there when two young male Malamutes went after each other was to reach in and grab the aggressor by the testicles and gave em a good yank. That took the starch out of him in a hurry enabling me to get a hold on his collar.
    Two vet friends taught me to grab AND HOLD the family jewels. They won't turn and bite you if you maintain that hold. They actually helped me break up a dog attacking another dog that was walking by a trailer on a leash, the attacker was theoretically tied to the trailer but one strong jerk and he got loose. Some healthy bashes with a handy lawn chair got the aggressor to let go of the other dog, and keeping that chair handy, I got the end of the loose rope and we got him inside the horse trailer. Lesson to owner when she returned being, don't leave your aggressive dog tied out when you aren't here.

    I have not been attacked myself, maybe just dumb luck or maybe I just project 'don't mess with me' vibes. When I'm on a horse, I find that speaking cheerfully to a dog that's barking/approaching really seems to throw them off of course they for the most part aren't stupid enough to tangle with those hooves. And I say for the most part because a shepherd did once attach a horse on the belly, and another ran up behind and nailed my horse just above the hock.



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