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  1. #1
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    Default Cane Corso moved in 3 doors down (Townhouses) am I being unreasonably concerned?

    Title pretty much sums it up - except I didn't mention that the dog is a female puppy about 5-6 months old. So far seems pretty friendly but having read about the guy dying from an attack by 2 of them in Michigan am now a little concerned - not for me as much but for my dog (and others in my neighborhood). Of course, the guy has some macho thing about having the dog on a leash and NO collar This morning the dog comes out of nowhere while I'm walking my leashed dog (med/small) so I ask him about leash and collar.. "she's in intermediate training".

    I'm in a townhouse community so we have lots of common areas - one of which is a large grassy area in front of our section of houses where he lets her run around. Its not fenced.



  2. #2
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    Nov. 24, 2010
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    I'm assuming you mean he's using a leash that loops around the dog's neck, like the leads used in dog shows and for training. That's not macho, that's control and training! Much better for the dog and handler than a regular collar with snap-on leash, which can't be adjusted for tension on the dog's neck so pretty useless for training heeling, etc.

    Assuming the dog's owner knows what he's talking about and has the puppy in a good program, intermediate training for a 5-6-months-old puppy is doing pretty well, IMO.

    When "the dog came out of nowhere," was she off-leash? Is that permitted in your community in common areas?
    RoanPonyMare


    9 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Apr. 1, 2011
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    Default

    Isn't there a rule about dogs being on a leash? I would talk to the management about that. Also, it's surprising to me that Cane Corsos are even allowed, most places don't allow you to bring breeds like that into the complex. Not that I agree with it but that's usually how it goes.

    I wouldn't be concerned about it being a Cane Corso specifically. I would just keep an eye on the owner as the pup matures and see if any small problems, and address them before they become big ones.

    I live in an urban neighborhood with a lot of pit bulls, and yes, I've seen a Cane Corso around as well. I have never had a single issue with any of those dogs, although sometimes they bark pretty ferociously at my dog from behind their fences.

    The only dog I've had an issue with in my neighborhood was a mutt that the owners were letting run loose, and it chased after my dog while I was walking her. I called Animal Control (not knowing at the time that the dog belonged to my neighbor), and I haven't seen it off a leash since.


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  4. #4
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    Apr. 12, 2002
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    At this point? Yes. Maybe the owner will be a jerk who teaches his dog nothing, but at this point you do not know that, nor do you know what the dog's temperament is like, or will become. Since the dog is a puppy, you can use the interactions you have to teach the dog how it should respond to you and your dog.

    Change Cane Corso to Labrador Retriever and read your post again. How does it sound? Yes, people have been mauled, and children killed by Labs, but no one is freaked out by them.

    Ishi on this board has Presa Canerios (sp), the same breed that attacked and killed the lady in the hallway in front of her apartment. She has 2 or 3 of them and they live on their horse farm with her 2 young children. They are the sweetest most loving dogs ever. One was even a rescue that she acquired when she was older.

    You can't judge a breed by one dog or one incident. Some owners are just bad people and they raise dogs to be bad, and some dogs have a screw loose. It happens.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :


    25 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Aug. 6, 2002
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    NJ, USA
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    It entirely depends on who owns that Cane Corso. In this case, the no leash thing would raise major concerns for me. I own a pair from a breed high up on the aggression scale (Caucasian Ovcharkas!) but before I got those puppies I did the research and knew it was my responsibility to prevent any problems.

    So this guy either a) didn't do any research on the breed or b) is as you say macho & enjoys the fact that people might be scared.

    Can you have a chat & bring up the news of Cane Corso attacks in the past? (In sort of a, "hey, cool dog - did you hear about the 2 CC's that attacked that lady?") And request that he use a leash & proper confinement? Or do you have a leash law you can point out to him?

    If that's not possible I'd start a graduating campaign to have the authorities impose a leash & proper containment on him. No matter how well I've socialized my CO's, if they were running about loose in the neighborhood other small/medium dogs would be in danger. I would be concerned about your small/medium until that CC is under control.


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  6. #6
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    Apr. 19, 2004
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    I'd be concerned. Just be THAT person and call your HOA and PD every.single.time. there is a leash violation. Every time. Why not? I would. Legitimate concern or not, it's a concern. Listen to your gut. Again, what's the harm in calling? Other then being *that* person and frankly, I am beyond caring about that.

    2 of them killed that woman in California some years back now, while they were on a leash being held by their owner. So yes, I'd be concerned indeed.


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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sswor View Post
    2 of them killed that woman in California some years back now, while they were on a leash being held by their owner. So yes, I'd be concerned indeed.
    Those were Presas, not Canes.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Default

    Is there a major difference in genetics?


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  9. #9
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    May. 2, 2011
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    Default

    One moved in to my old apartment complex that did not allow pit bulls or 'other aggressive breeds'. I thought it was a pit bull the first time I saw it, as I didn't get a good look at it since it was barking at me/trying to jump.

    I notified management and they 'checked' on the dog and came back with 'it's a Cane Corso, which isn't an aggressive breed' So the fact that it was being walked and when it saw me started barking and trying to get away from it's owner doesn't make it aggressive either??

    I'd call the HOA, hopefully they're more helpful than my landlord!



  10. #10
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    If it's off leash and your jurisdiction doesn't allow that, report him every time he does it.
    Proud Member Of The Lady Mafia


    4 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    One is from Italy, one is from Spain. The Cane is actually considered to be a very even tempered, calm, quiet, reserved, stable, and trainable breed. The Presa is considered strong-willed and dominant, but also calm and gentle. Canes were bred to be guardians, companions, and hunters, while Presas were bred to work around and with livestock. Presas are considered not stranger friendly. Canes are normally considered more family type dogs.

    I do not know the genetics of either, but they are different breeds and not sub-species of one another.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :


    12 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Mar. 8, 2006
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    I didn't know what a Cane Corso was so I googled it. One description said they don't like other dogs. Not even their own breed, or opposite sex of their own breed. Made me laugh. I'm guessing they don't have very good dispositions?


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  13. #13
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    I agree - a leash with no collar is probably a training lead.

    I just cleaned out a bunch of my stuff for the garage sale, and came across one. Also keep them in the car just in case I come across a loose dog on the road. They work perfectly in providing pressure just behind the ear, only when needed. My Irish Wolfhound, who I adopted at 5 years old, was trained fairly easily with one, vs. her prior owner not being able to control her on a snap together collar and thick lead.
    How can there be so many currents in such a little puddle?
    National Velvet


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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dispatcher View Post
    I didn't know what a Cane Corso was so I googled it. One description said they don't like other dogs. Not even their own breed, or opposite sex of their own breed. Made me laugh. I'm guessing they don't have very good dispositions?
    LOL, one page says that "a somewhat belligerent attitude towards other dogs, particularly dogs of the same sex" is not a fault as long as it's not aggression
    Proud Member Of The Lady Mafia


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Default

    I'm not sure what you mean by a leash and no collar. Is the dog leashed or not?

    My old neighbor's babysitter has a Cane Corso that she brought along with her. She got him as a puppy, but he is probably 160lbs fully grown! Very, very sweet dog and he played nicely with my Border Collie mix. She was afraid when she first met him, as he acted silly like a puppy (he was one), but was far bigger than she. Once she got used to his sheer size, and figured out that she could, in fact, discipline him mildly for rude puppy behavior, they got along great. Fully grown, he was smart enough to figure out that he weighed more than twice what she does and would let her sit on him and slam him to the ground, but not sit on or slam her, or she'd quit playing.


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  16. #16
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    Feb. 8, 2007
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    Alabama
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    Regarding breed bias...
    Bassett hounds look like big droopy eyed lazy sweetie-pies, right? Well mine got us on the UPS "do not deliver" list. Also the water company won't come out and read the meter. She's not viscous per se, but she's definitely overly protective. And oh dear god, don't approach her with a stick in your hand.
    OP- judge the dog, not the breed.


    19 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
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    Oct. 15, 2011
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    I'll admit I know next to nothing about Cane Corsos but my friend has two of them, a male and a female (NOT a breeding pair, both fixed), as well as a Mastiff. The Mastiff and the male Cane Corso are not as friendly to strangers and not allowed around other people when my friend has guests over but the female Cane Corso is a total doll and likes everyone. She looks intimidating (she's a black dog with cropped ears), but she's very sweet.
    *Wendy* 4.17.73 - 12.20.05



  18. #18
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    Jun. 20, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by RPM View Post
    I'm assuming you mean he's using a leash that loops around the dog's neck, like the leads used in dog shows and for training. That's not macho, that's control and training!

    Assuming the dog's owner knows what he's talking about and has the puppy in a good program, intermediate training for a 5-6-months-old puppy is doing pretty well, IMO.

    When "the dog came out of nowhere," was she off-leash? Is that permitted in your community in common areas?
    when I said the dog came out of nowhere it had no leash or collar on. I have only seen him use collar and leash one time.his explanation of dog not being on leash much less not wearing a collar - was because she was in "intermediate training".

    and yes, where I live, dogs are supposed to be leashed always when outside unless contained in a fenced in area or a county approved dog park.

    At this point? Yes. Maybe the owner will be a jerk who teaches his dog nothing, but at this point you do not know that, nor do you know what the dog's temperament is like, or will become. Since the dog is a puppy, you can use the interactions you have to teach the dog how it should respond to you and your dog.

    Change Cane Corso to Labrador Retriever and read your post again. How does it sound? Yes, people have been mauled, and children killed by Labs, but no one is freaked out by them.


    I wouldn't have a problem with the puppy interacting w/ my dog if it had a collar and leash on - owner doesn't/won't use them. He's training the dog by reading books.

    I know any breed can be aggressive - but there are breed characteristics that make certain dogs better suited for certain jobs/things. I've never heard about pits or mastiffs making good bird or hunting dogs, nor have I ever heard of police busting up a lab retriever dog fighting ring.. A friend of mine hunts - he's got a lab and a pit - he doesn't take the pit hunting w/ him.


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  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by gottagrey View Post
    when I said the dog came out of nowhere it had no leash or collar on. I have only seen him use collar and leash one time.his explanation of dog not being on leash much less not wearing a collar - was because she was in "intermediate training".

    and yes, where I live, dogs are supposed to be leashed always when outside unless contained in a fenced in area or a county approved dog park.



    I wouldn't have a problem with the puppy interacting w/ my dog if it had a collar and leash on - owner doesn't/won't use them. He's training the dog by reading books.

    I know any breed can be aggressive - but there are breed characteristics that make certain dogs better suited for certain jobs/things. I've never heard about pits or mastiffs making good bird or hunting dogs, nor have I ever heard of police busting up a lab retriever dog fighting ring.. A friend of mine hunts - he's got a lab and a pit - he doesn't take the pit hunting w/ him.
    Lots of pit and mastiff or pit crosses out hunting here. They mix them with curs and the like for hog dogs. I didn't know it was thing either until I moved here.

    If the police did bust up a lab dog fighting ring, you wouldn't hear about it, or the dogs would become pits all of a sudden..lol.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :


    6 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Mar. 4, 2004
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    Louisville, KY
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    Is there a homeowner association in charge of the common areas or leash laws otherwise? If so, I'd just contact them (or the city, animal control, whoever enforces the rules) everytime she's out sans leash. But I'd probably do that for any dog, not just because this one is a Cane. Then I wouldn't worry about it unless you see some aggression or other cause for concern. Hopefully someone with some clout can talk to the owner about the need for a leash.
    Caitlin
    *OMGiH I Loff my Mare* and *My Saddlebred Can Do Anything Your Horse Can Do*
    http://community.webshots.com/user/redmare01


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