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  1. #21
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    Apr. 14, 2001
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    FINALLY found the article I read about India's vultures.

    http://www.vqronline.org/essay/2011/...shing-vultures

    Excellent piece about their issue.


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  2. #22
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    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by Calamber View Post
    I am sorry for your loss but I do have to say that Sam hardly died a natural death. He was deathly ill and allowed to die overnight after being cast or fell and could not get up for unknown reasons. I am sorry that he suffered overnight but not exactly natural, and why are you allowed to let a horse corpse lie on your property for five days, don't you have health laws in your part of the country?
    Clamber your reading comprehension sucks. She said her older horse died a natural death NOT SAM.

    I'm not even going to bother going back because I remember that thread and she did have the vet and did treat the horse. Whether it worked or not or how the horse ultimately passed he was being treated.

    As for corpse disposal a lot of big rural farms especially cattle farms don't bury their dead. Just because we've become accustomed to burying livestock doesn't mean if one has the property and mind to not ....they've committed a crime.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"


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  3. #23
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Here burying is discouraged because it may contaminate water sources.


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  4. #24
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    Middle Tennessee
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    WW- I'm sorry for your loss. I'm also sorry some folks are tactless.
    Don't fall for a girl who fell for a horse just to be number two in her world... ~EFO


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  5. #25
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
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    Lynwood, you don't have to go back and read that thread about the old horse, I am talking about Sam, and her story has changed so many times now it is worth rereading the quote in question. For the sake of it, I did not say the horse was cast when it was dying, it was either cast, fell down, was knocked down and bitten or fell in a flood. I just doubt the whole story now since it has changed so dramatically from "....he went down shortly after the vet left and would not get up, then he was dead in the morning." The horse bled out for 11 days, was likely in shock when the vet was there, diagnosed anemia without a blood test and said to give the horse Red Cell and Metamucil? What the hell? OP, aren't you the same person who had two dogs mysteriously disappear and possibly a drug addicted daughter and friends were involved? That is quite a bit of drama to happen in a short period of time.


    Here is her quote from the first paragraph and it does include that Sam died from "natural causes" which I guess, means either a horse bit him, he fell in the flood and couldn't get back up, or whatever happened that is called natural about letting a horse linger and die.

    "My dad always told me that buzzards wouldn't touch the carcass of an animal that has been treated with anitbiotics. As y'all know, I have had two horses die in the past month. Because they died from natural causes,....."
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy


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  6. #26
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    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Clamber I do believe in that statement she was referencing that neither had been euthanized using phenobarbital and there for "safe" for scavenging.

    As for what killed him. We had a gelding with a slow abdominal bleed similar symptoms that they DID try anti coagulates , iv's , plasma ultrasounds. He was aged behaved similarly. We Euthanized after a little over a week 8 days I think and his necropsy showed TOTALLY different then what the vet thought they saw in the ultrasound. It ended up being a splenetic bleed with capsular tear. At different points the vet projected that when Kadeen was feeling /looking better the spleen most likely clotted off or formed a hematoma and when his condition would slid back it was due to rupture of such. At first call his symptoms were of that of a mild colic blood work confirmed a bleed and the plan changed.

    He said trauma was most likely the source and at his age it could have been as simply as lurching to his feet or twisting the wrong way. Other options could have included a kick or fall.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"


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  7. #27
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    Which horse had the lightning strike by him that "could have" caused his death? Or he fell? And was bitten on neck by another horse according to vet but OP said her horses don't bite each other? Too many versions and no diagnosis.

    I think what some of us are concerned about is that the OP did not have the horses put down, but instead let them die "naturally." That takes time. And pain. OK, so she drags the bodies into the back field rather than bury them, and now she's concerned that one body is just lying there. Not what I'd do, but OP's horses were already dead before that. But letting 2 horses go down and then OP and vet decide it's OK to everyone hit the sack for a good night's sleep and let horses fend for themselves when they were downers? Not good. Euth a horse if you cannot afford to pay for COMPETENT vet care or if you don't want to be bothered by having to stay up and care for the horse.
    I agree with Calamber. And I feel sorry for the horses. OP won't get any sympathy from me.


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  8. #28
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    Apr. 14, 2008
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Which horse had the lightning strike by him that "could have" caused his death? Or he fell? And was bitten on neck by another horse according to vet but OP said her horses don't bite each other? Too many versions and no diagnosis.

    I think what some of us are concerned about is that the OP did not have the horses put down, but instead let them die "naturally." That takes time. And pain. OK, so she drags the bodies into the back field rather than bury them, and now she's concerned that one body is just lying there. Not what I'd do, but OP's horses were already dead before that. But letting 2 horses go down and then OP and vet decide it's OK to everyone hit the sack for a good night's sleep and let horses fend for themselves when they were downers? Not good. Euth a horse if you cannot afford to pay for COMPETENT vet care or if you don't want to be bothered by having to stay up and care for the horse.
    I agree with Calamber. And I feel sorry for the horses. OP won't get any sympathy from me.
    Where are you getting the story that two horses went down at the same time???
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  9. #29
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    SF Bay Area, California
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Having gone through a similar situation a month ago, with a boarder's horse...vet out twice too, but I checked on him every two hours for two nights until his last morning when I found him down and in distress at 6 am and called the vet to have him PTS. And he wasn't even my horse.

    I'm sorry, with those symptoms, how can someone go to sleep and sleep all night without checking? I just can't do it, I guess some of you can.
    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    Where I come from, what she did was reasonable especially since there was a vet involved.
    I guess it all depends on where you live and whether you regard your horses as livestock or pets. The ONE time my horse had a mild gas colic, I stayed with her all night, even after she delivered the nice wet pile of poop my vet said to wait for. I don't know how anyone could go to sleep knowing their horse is ill and not out of the woods, but that's just me. (And Laura KY).

    Quote Originally Posted by wireweiners View Post
    Sam has been gone 5 days now and I have yet to see a single buzzard.

    I hope y'all don't think I'm heartless but I'm not sentimental about dead bodies and I do believe in nature taking its course, or the circle of life.
    So will you just let the body rot and decompose on its own or will you go ahead and bury it?
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
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  10. #30
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    Jun. 11, 2013
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    Some painkillers kill vultures.



  11. #31
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    Oct. 1, 2004
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    I seem to recall something about buzzards being actually more sight-oriented than scent-oriented and taking cues from other scavengers. Regardless, presence of antibiotics won't deter a buzzard. If they find it, they'll eat it. They are not apt to eat it after five days though. Even buzzards prefer the buffet to be fresh.
    Jer 29: 11-13



  12. #32
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    Oct. 22, 2011
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    My area is over-run with deer AND vultures. My neighbors farm about 1000 acres along the Potomac, and they have had LOTS of deer die in and along their fields in the last decade or so. They think it is "blue tongue" that is killing them, and they have also noticed the vultures will eat every bit of one deer, but leave the carcass of another untouched 100' away. They think the vultures know which deer had blue tongue and won't eat it.

    I have noticed it along the local roads, too. Some deer/critters completely disappear, while others lay there untouched forever.

    Or maybe it is just that the vultures have too big of a buffet to choose from.... who knows.



  13. #33
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    Dec. 13, 2005
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    New England
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    You don't have to agree with how the OP handled the situation, or the carcass removal, but don't lose sight if the fact that everything that lives, eventually dies.
    Everything.
    Sometimes animals die despite our best efforts. Sometimes they survive despite us. Anyone who has horses long term will eventually be faced with the death of one. It isn't easy at any point. It's messy, problematic from the logistics end of it, emotionally devastating and often times financially devastating.

    That being said, I for sure would never start a thread like this one; it's coming across like chumming the waters. And an awful lot of people are jumping on it.


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  14. #34
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    May. 19, 2014
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    Houston, TX USA
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    I bet since they just had horse the vulture wives are in the mood for something different.


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  15. #35
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    Oct. 1, 2005
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    Sandy, Utah
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    I don't consider the OP to be heartless or lacking in compassion or guilty of letting an animal suffer. Matter of fact explanations just often don't translate well for those who have not lived in rural settings, which is by far most of us.

    I would not think antibiotics or not would be something vultures would sense. Could just be they had plenty to eat of late, and weren't hungry. I am curious though, do you have coyotes and have they been scavenging?


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  16. #36
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    Dec. 16, 2013
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    Northeast
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    This is another classic case of overzealous posters taking one question and flipping the post ass over tea kettle to drag the OP's prior posts into the limelight. Seriously, what is the purpose? Will it bring the horses back?

    OP, I am sorry for your loss. In my brief experience with birds of prey, they tend to not care what died how it got there, but two large dead animals likely means they have are not terribly hungry.


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