The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 31
  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    3,373

    Default MD Barns - Yay or Nay?

    A number of years ago we attended a small show at someone's farm, and they had a really nice MD Barn. I've remembered it all these years and have wondered about them.

    Here's the web site, if you haven't seen them before: http://www.mdbarns.com/

    I especially like the part where they are chewproof, nearly fireproof, and kickproof, with a lifetime kick through warranty. Not that my ponies are naughty in the barn, but who knows what will come through a barn over a lifetime!

    I would love to hear opinions from those who have one... or know someone who does!!

    We are wanting to tear down an old barn here and replace it with something better. We currently use it as a hay barn, with an attached 5 stall addition. In years past we have set up panels to make stalls on the interior, but I really don't like to do that. It's an old, icky barn that was originally built for something else. We've made it clean and pleasant and workable, but I'm just itching to replace it! I'd love to have 10 or 12 stalls and a nice tack room and a nice tight feed room.
    Family Partners Welsh Ponies - Home of Section B Welsh stallion *Wedderlie Mardi Gras LOM/AOE http://www.welshponies.com
    Click here to buy: A Guide To In Hand Showing of Your Welsh Pony



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,335

    Default

    I have a Barnmaster barn, (owned and operated by the MD people), and basically the same, so feel sort of qualified to give my two cents. I really like my barn. After three years, it looks virtually like new. I had bids from both MD and Barnmaster, and they were the same price. It just came down to how I felt about the local dealer.

    The greatest part was it was built in a week. No one else could match that time frame.

    I have a six stall, gable style, 16 foot center aisle, dutch doors from the stalls to attached runs, auto waterers, yoke front sliding doors. I have a 10 foot overhang over the stalls, and had them do rain gutters, too. I also have a matching hay structure, which they built at the same time. It's 12x16 and I wish I would have gone bigger. Hindsight.

    I would go modular again in a heartbeat.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    I'd like to hear more about them too. Honestly, I wrote them off when we were looking because they look so... flimsy maybe, to me. I guess I just don't like the looks of all the panels pieced together all over the barn, but for the right price I could get over that if they were indeed just as strong as a stick built one.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 2, 2003
    Location
    Woodland, Ca
    Posts
    6,282

    Default

    Mine is 9 years old and it's great... I think that they have made some changes to the latchs since I got mine, which would be a good thing. I have dutch doors and the biggest problem that I have is with the u-bolts that are the door latchs... the screws strip out. Other than that the barn looks great.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,430

    Default

    I boarded at a place with MD Barns and I really liked them. I did not consider it flimsy -- it was holding up great after a couple of years of heavy boarding-barn use. Everything about it was designed and constructed in a way that was really horse-safe -- no sharp edges, funky latches, protruding hardware, etc. like in so many wood barns. The only thing I did not like was the metal roof in the rain -- the noise was deafening.

    I have a wood barn at home, and I do like it for a lot of reasons, but I would consider an MD if I was doing it again.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    May. 28, 2002
    Posts
    2,915

    Default

    I personally do not like the ones I have seen - just a personal preference,that is all. I would go with a Morton barn before I went with an MD barn. Just always felt "plastic" to me.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 27, 2003
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    69

    Talking MD Barns

    I have personal experience with MD Barns as we just completed our brand new raised center aisle barn today (fire rebuild). Although MD Barns now owns Barnmaster Barns, there is a HUGE difference in quality between the two. If you look closely at the structure, especially the trusses and purlins, as well as the wall construction, you can easily see why MD Barns looks at Barnmaster as their "economy barn", and the lower pricing is reflective of the lack of quality..

    I have been 100% satisfied with my entire experience with MD Barns, especially the way that they continued to follow up with me even after they did not initially win my contract. The company that I had initially chosen basically took my huge deposit (nearly $100K) and then promptly raised their price by 30% within a few weeks of taking my money. MD Barn made it very easy for me to work through them while our attorney worked on getting our money back (that is another store - bottom line, stay clear of FCP barns!).

    MD Barn assisted with the design and redesigning (times 20!) of my beautiful new dream barn. We spared no expense in providing our 12 horses with the best of the best, and we asolutely LOVE our new barn. I have many friends that have owned MD Barns and everyone has been completely satisfied with their barn. I would never use anyone else - they were always there to make sure that all the tiny details were addressed, and it is very clear that they want their customers to be 100% satisfied. I would highly recommend them and especially "my" MD Barn rep: Terri Bartz who is based in Temecula, CA.
    www.SanDiegoSporthorses.com - San Diego Sporthorses - breeders of international quality warmblood offspring. Breeder of the year and breeder of many Horse of the Year offspring.



  8. #8

    Default

    MD Barns is waaaaayyyy stronger and more durable than a wood barn, can't imagine how anyone would think they're flimsy. I just built mine, after waiting many years for my dream farm, and I am really impressed. All my friends who have wood barns have walked in, and their jaws have dropped at the engineering of it.

    Mine is part of a business, and it uniquely offered accelerated 7 year depreciation, and it will be worth the same (or likely more) 10 years down the road because it's so durable. That's not something you can say about a wood barn, that's for sure.

    Hmm.... fire safety was big for me. And lastly, yes, they do not have the inherent charm of an all wood barn, but I did a few things that will completely erase that disadvantage. One, I ordered the inside panels in the same color as the outside (so not the plain standard grey). Two, I am painting all the silver panel borders, so they will "disappear". Three, I put some real thought into the design of the barn, and MD worked with me to create a custom solution that turned out very pleasing to the eye, from an architectural design standpoint. And four, I'm landscaping.

    The MD Barn is so superior for both my horse's health and safety and for the strength of my balance sheet, that taking a few steps to make it as pretty as a wood barn was totally worth it. Like they say with horses - "pretty is as pretty does".


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 3, 2006
    Posts
    350

    Default

    I love my MD stalls. I used the stall walls to retrofit a old cow barn and it has been great. I have a mare who is probably 1700 lbs and has tried to kick thru the walls and lean rhythmically against the walls when in heat and the walls have held.

    The only concern is to keep the metal walls raised above the wet in the stalls. I used the galvanized walls and they do rust eventually. However, they are still solid. They are easy to clean and look very neat. However, if you like to nail things to the walls they are not for you.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Posts
    2,108

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by throwurheart View Post
    MD Barns is waaaaayyyy stronger and more durable than a wood barn, can't imagine how anyone would think they're flimsy.
    I wasn't sure if someone else said it, but I've never seen one in person. Just said they looked like it and I wanted to learn more about them. I think it's all the visible pieces that you can see. Maybe gives it a "house of cards" look to it.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by dmalbone View Post
    I wasn't sure if someone else said it, but I've never seen one in person. Just said they looked like it and I wanted to learn more about them. I think it's all the visible pieces that you can see. Maybe gives it a "house of cards" look to it.
    Funny... the shape and color can be just as gorgeous as a wooden barn - mine is raised center aisle, for example, desert stone in color with a brick red roof - but everyone with aesthetic sensibilities, including me, initially is fussy about the connector lines.

    When you really study the construction of the MD though, it will totally impress you versus wood barn or concrete block construction. Once you realize it's a better product for both your sanity (maintenance and safety worries go away) and your horses, you look past the visible connectors and start figuring out a way to hide them. It's really pretty simple... you paint them the same color as the barn.

    I'm also at an age where I've (finally!) gotten smart with my money, and I view this as an asset that will hold its value, depending on the cost of steel and market forces. A wood barn generally won't, because it ages quicker.

    EAH is right, you do have to keep the shavings clear of the bottom of the walls to avoid the wet sitting on the metal forever. My walls are set on top of concrete ribbons, the stalls are essentially giant litterboxes, with a six inch drop in the concrete to give me plenty of room to bed deep if I need to. I simply pull the bedding off the walls every time I clean.

    However, I have no problem screwing things to the walls (not nailing). I ordered my stalls with the corner tack lockers, which are TOO COOL, gotta say :-) and I screwed in saddle racks, bridle hooks, tall boot keepers, polo racks etc. A few times I had to move something, and simply filled the hole with clear caulk to make sure the wood core was not exposed.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Location
    Oregon
    Posts
    3,373

    Default

    Thank you so much everyone for your feedback!

    I didn't realize MD and Barnmaster were connected. Interesting.

    Do any of you have pictures of your MD barns? I'd love to see!
    Family Partners Welsh Ponies - Home of Section B Welsh stallion *Wedderlie Mardi Gras LOM/AOE http://www.welshponies.com
    Click here to buy: A Guide To In Hand Showing of Your Welsh Pony



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2007
    Posts
    234

    Default

    Interesting question, and much depends on where you are located. No one out west builds traditional barns much any more, because we have Barnmaster/MD and FCP (superior, in my experience and opinion) all in Southern California.

    THe modular approach is well worth considering, even if only for internal walls- but freight might be a killer if you are in the east, as well as other weather conditions.

    We have a 50 horse boarding stable with both Barnmaster and FCP barns... there have been virtually no repairs in several years with either, they are pretty darn tough, easy to put up (even move) and horse friendly.

    These modular barn companies out west are kind of like the Amish builders in the east: good, but know what you are looking for and shop carefully.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Motivation View Post
    Interesting question, and much depends on where you are located. No one out west builds traditional barns much any more, because we have Barnmaster/MD and FCP (superior, in my experience and opinion) all in Southern California.

    THe modular approach is well worth considering, even if only for internal walls- but freight might be a killer if you are in the east, as well as other weather conditions.

    We have a 50 horse boarding stable with both Barnmaster and FCP barns... there have been virtually no repairs in several years with either, they are pretty darn tough, easy to put up (even move) and horse friendly.

    These modular barn companies out west are kind of like the Amish builders in the east: good, but know what you are looking for and shop carefully.
    Totally guessing here, but I think very generally speaking, the west is more practical in its horse housing, the east is more focused on traditional looks and beauty. Talking mainly about the big barns that cost a lot of money, but it trickles down from there too. The west also has forest and brush fires to contend with, and earthquakes and so forth, that drive those decisions. But barn fires are certainly an issue on the east coast, as are hurricanes and snow load. My freight to Florida wasn't pretty, but it wasn't a dealbreaker when I looked at the bottom line. My MD is an asset that I can move to another property, and that might actually hold its value.

    My dad looked up into the rafters, and I told him it was rated to 130 mph (I'm in a pretty protected spot in Florida, so 130 is considered plenty sufficient) and he said - "well, I know where we're coming if we get a hurricane". MD has pics of a family living in their MD after Katrina, a naked slab where their house used to be. That was a big selling point for me.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2007
    Location
    AreaII
    Posts
    1,351

    Default

    I have a 24-stall double shedrow MD barn. I board TB racehorses and would never ever ever (!!!!) have any other kind of barn. It's 6 years old now and doesn't show one day of wear. We powerwash inside/out 2x/year. There are (of course) kick marks in the stalls- but not one has kicked through. They can not chew, crib, kick, climb, etc.

    It is hands down the easiest barn to care for. Strip everything, powerwash, rebed. Awesome! I chose hunter green for the outside (my colors) and white for the inside panels. Stall fronts are hosed down almost daily to keep dust off. (I have masonary sand aisles bc we ride babies around the shedrow). It is bright and inviting and looks larger than it really is inside.

    One piece of advice-- get the insulation and raised center aisle. Mine was contracted for both and the MD-contracted installer did not do either. (MD did not bring center aisle- installer did not install insulation). MD gave me my money back but I had to do MAJOR work to prevent oven-baking in the summer time!

    As for flimsy- I can't understand that in an MD barn. Maybe the knock off brands. Friends of mine paid the same 6-figures for a wood barn and now 8 years later are replacing many many many stall boards, doors, wash rack walls, etc. Meanwhile- I'm sipping coffee in my tack room!

    Good luck!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    45,937

    Default

    Any pictures you could share?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2003
    Location
    NorthEast
    Posts
    24,895

    Default

    Also would love to see photos of folks' barns.
    Just checked the website...I love the look of their Alpine Series barns.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jan. 23, 2004
    Location
    Camden, De
    Posts
    3,653

    Default

    Here is my MD barn story. We bought our acreage but being young and just starting out I really didn't think we could afford to put the barn up for another year or two. We were looking to build a 8 stall barn with tack room, wash stall and feed room. I was browsing craigslist when I found a 20 stall MD barn that had been taken down in Maryland and was for sale. I bought 12 stalls and the guy who had the barn installed it on my property. I paid $45k for a 36x72 foot barn and I love it! I have 8 stalls and a wash room, tack room, feed room and hay storage room. It is not the barn of my dreams but so functional and even after having being moved and reinstalled it is in great condition. I did order new dividers because I wanted an open feeling and the previous wall dividers were solid. Mine are 4ft of solid and then the dividing bars. I love the swing out feed doors which make feeding so quick. I also bought dutch doors for my barn and used the extra panels to build a run in shed with.

    It truly is a very solid barn. I have on horse who kicks the crap out of the wall and he barely makes a dent. Love the sliding doors and how everything is so easy to clean. It has a very bright and airy feeling.

    Pics-
    http://inlinethumb63.webshots.com/43...500x500Q85.jpg
    http://inlinethumb17.webshots.com/31...500x500Q85.jpg
    http://inlinethumb07.webshots.com/43...500x500Q85.jpg
    http://inlinethumb42.webshots.com/46...500x500Q85.jpg
    http://inlinethumb12.webshots.com/44...500x500Q85.jpg

    Panels we used to make a 12x24 run in shed
    http://inlinethumb19.webshots.com/45...500x500Q85.jpg

    I still have 8 panels but no space for another run-in we just don't have enough acreage.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2009
    Posts
    19

    Default

    If you have a termite problem in your area, I highly recommend a modular barn. I live in Texas and the "standard" barn around here is a metal building with wooden stalls built inside. The wood rots pretty quickly, and if it touches the ground, termites eat it up.

    We have 20 year old Morton barn that is wood frame and wood stalls with metal sheeting and roof. It is being eaten off at ground level by termites. We have had it tented, sprayed, baited, and they won't go away. Termites eat wood fences here too, if the heat and intense sun doesn't get them first.

    We are planning to rebuild our current barn with modular stalls, to keep the wood off the ground, and slap a for sale sign on the place.

    We are building a new horse property and I'm trying to find a gently-used disassembled Barnmaster or MD Barn. Check craigslist; they pop up frequently.

    I agree that MD Barn quality seems higher than Barnmaster. I did not know one purchased the other; the story I heard was that Barnmaster was started by people who left MD and set up a competing business.

    I've been told by our local Barnmaster dealer that you can assemble an MD or Barnmaster type barn, the kind with the standard center aisle and 8' side walls, with 3 people or less, if you rent the right equipment (a scissor lift and a forklift). Each panel supposedly weighs about 500 pounds.

    Our local Barnmaster dealer has a silver bubble wrap type insulation on the underside of the roof of the display barn and it seems to do the trick. I agree that the raised center aisle design creates some nice airflow. If we were to build a metal building barn I would use the spray foam insulation on all the walls.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    45,937

    Default

    Termites is what happened to our race horse training barn, that was wood with stucco outside.
    Termites tunneled right up the stucco clear to the rafters, that they also ate.
    It took them, insecticides just barely slowing them down, 33 years to eat it up to where we had to bulldoze it before it imploded.
    It also was a fire trap, so I was not unhappy of it's demise, even if it was a mighty fine barn.

    I don't know about these barns, but the old Porta-Stalls, that started the modular barns, were sure very neat ones, our vets built two barns out of them, as did many local trainers and those are still standing out there.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 1
    Last Post: Jul. 21, 2012, 09:28 PM
  2. European barns Vs. US barns
    By alterhorse in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 26
    Last Post: Apr. 19, 2012, 01:33 PM
  3. Barns in CT/MA/NY
    By jumper.jump in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: Apr. 13, 2011, 06:57 AM
  4. Replies: 5
    Last Post: Apr. 13, 2010, 06:06 PM
  5. Michigan Hunter-Jumper Barns-Incredible Competitive Barns
    By JumpinRealHigh in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 127
    Last Post: Jan. 12, 2004, 03:43 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •