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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
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    1,339

    Default Feet problems

    I've never had the prettiest feet, but the situation has dissolved into . . . a problem.
    I'm in my mid-30s and do wear heels most days, but not terribly high heels (maybe 2 to 3 inches). My feet have gotten really awful. I have corns on my toes. I have a terrible callus underneath my big toe joint on one foot (interestingly, the other foot is unaffected).
    What do I do? Go to a podiatrist? I can't really change all of my shoes, realistically. I don't wear shoes that hurt my feet really bad, but all dress shoes seem to hurt a little bit. I think most of my shoes fit fairly well.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 11, 2010
    Location
    S. Calif.
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    697

    Default

    If your shoes hurt just a little bit and you are developing calluses, I would say that you probably need shoes that fit a bit better (maybe 1/2 size bigger). I used to wear high heels all day for work and they absolutely did not bother my feet unless I had a pair that did not fit correctly.

    The few that were just not quite right were usually the result of purchasing a pair shoes that I loved but when I tried them they were just not quite right. I figured that they would work fine once I broke them in or that they were really ok, but of course, they were never quite right.

    Find shoes that are extremely comfortable the first time you try them on and you will be fine. Also try going up 1/2 or a full size. High heels usually have more pointed toes (than say tennis shoes) and you need room for your toes (or they get calluses on the top where they are lightly rubbing the shoe).

    Good luck!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2010
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    283

    Default

    You need to go to a podiatrist.

    One thing that will help with the pain is to wear a different height each day.
    This will put the pressure in a different place giving your feet time to recover.
    It is also better for your shoes if they have time to dry properly between wears.

    However, the main thing you need to do is buy shoes that fit you properly from the first time you try them on. Failing that wear them wet in the bath and wear them until they dry.



  4. #4

    Default

    You may be wearing the right size, but the toe box might be wrong for your foot. But I agree, see a podiatrist.
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
    Location
    England
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    Default

    If you feel the size is right, you might want to try a wider shoe. Some heels can be very narrow and that will put pressure on your feet. Do you wear socks/tights/stockings? Do they have seems that could be rubbing?
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 25, 2009
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    Default

    Thanks. In the winter I generally wear tights or thin socks. In the summer I often don't as a lot of the summer shoes look weird with tights. Neither really makes a difference.
    I do think that the toe box is often the problem. Unfortunately I have, since high school, had hammer toes, and I think that makes things a lot more difficult.
    Sometimes I wish I had the type of job that one could wear tennis shoes to.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    9,989

    Default

    If you are getting corns your toes don't have enough room. Ask me how I know. Why are so many shoes made for people with 4 toes? Callouses may mean you need better support/cushioning.
    Last edited by grayarabpony; Jun. 1, 2014 at 04:53 PM.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
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    3,489

    Default

    Why, why, why do women feel they need to wear pointy toed, high heels that cause nothing but problems for their feet, legs (shortened Achilles' tendons) and spines. Men, with the exception of transvestites, wouldn't be caught dead in them. IMO, wearing shoes like this. They do make women look stupid. The higher the heel the stupider a woman looks, IMO.

    While yeah, one can't wear sneakers with some outfits or due to company dress codes, there are some very nice shoes made with flat or very low heels that also have nice rounded toes. Until women learn to say no to fashion and stop dressing to look attractive/ sexy, they will continue to hurt their bodies. Most are so brainwashed into following fashion whims of designers (talk about misogynists) they never even question why they are so willing to cause injury to themselves in the process.


    8 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 19, 2010
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    283

    Default

    Try looking at this site:http://www.shoetalk.co.nz/BLOG/How+t...and+shoes.html

    It tells you how to choose shoes according to your foot type, how to lace shoes according to foot type (I had no idea the lacing made such a difference) and how to look after your feet. It's also a shop that sells shoes for wider feet if that is the answer to your problems.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    9,989

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by rcloisonne View Post
    Why, why, why do women feel they need to wear pointy toed, high heels that cause nothing but problems for their feet, legs (shortened Achilles' tendons) and spines. Men, with the exception of transvestites, wouldn't be caught dead in them. IMO, wearing shoes like this. They do make women look stupid. The higher the heel the stupider a woman looks, IMO.

    While yeah, one can't wear sneakers with some outfits or due to company dress codes, there are some very nice shoes made with flat or very low heels that also have nice rounded toes. Until women learn to say no to fashion and stop dressing to look attractive/ sexy, they will continue to hurt their bodies. Most are so brainwashed into following fashion whims of designers (talk about misogynists) they never even question why they are so willing to cause injury to themselves in the process.
    I never wear heels and still have problems with corns and callouses. It's the nature of shoe design.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 21, 2012
    Posts
    610

    Default

    I would never ever wear heels...ever. Did I say never?

    I think they are a huge detriment to foot health over the long run.

    It's amazing what you 'can' wear with a black pair of running shoes or cross training shoes, which have a lot of support. All I had to do to get by the 'dress code' at work was to explain my foot soreness problem (from running) to my boss and ask for a waiver. It was never a problem and most people didn't notice or care.
    Be kind to your feet if you want to continue to use them as pain free as possible.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 30, 2005
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    England
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    Default

    I love a good pair of heels!! Saying that, I spend most of my life in flats and my feet still suck!
    Horse Show Names Free name website with over 6200 names. Want to add? PM me!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2005
    Location
    Va
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    Default

    I think the podiatrists bribe the designers to design the stiletto heel, pointy toe! It's good for business. I gave up fashion for comfort over 30 years ago. For real dressy occasions I have a 1" heel. Which I usually take off under the table while eating and always took them off and danced barefoot when I still did that type of thing.



  14. #14
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    1,339

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by minnie View Post
    I think the podiatrists bribe the designers to design the stiletto heel, pointy toe! It's good for business. I gave up fashion for comfort over 30 years ago. For real dressy occasions I have a 1" heel. Which I usually take off under the table while eating and always took them off and danced barefoot when I still did that type of thing.
    Probably!
    Honestly, though, I am talking about pretty low heels. While I think the pointy toes look very nice with the right outfit, my feet are way too wide to get in those shoes. I am mid-30s and really feel like most of my shoes qualify as old lady shoes, and that is really all I can wear.
    I do have a tendency to pick out the most comfortable ones, and wear them everyday. Maybe I need more comfortable pairs that are different so that I'm not wearing the same shoes every day.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    3,014

    Default

    Sometimes heavy callousing can be caused by athlete's foot fungus. DH used to have very heavy callouses. He started to more aggressively treat his athlete's foot and toe fungus and the callouses have largely gone away.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2002
    Location
    Cow County, MD
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    Default

    Yes, you need to see a podiatrist, and a good one.

    You are young. Your feet will only get worse. Arrest it now.

    I've posted before about the neuroma that ate my left foot (TNTAMLF). I have always had "finicky" feet that could only fit into rather expensive dress shoes. I never wore anything with a heel higher than 3 inches, more often just a kitten heel. Thanks to TNTAMLF, I am now unable to wear anything other than Keen, Merrell or Dansko shoes, which severely limits me in the "pretty shoe" department. But it's worth not having my feet hurt all the time.

    I am 45, and have to keep a pair of Merrell slip-ons beside my bed. I can't even walk to the bathroom without them. I'm basically a navicular horse now. I've had it injected, and with careful management can stay fairly sound.
    Life would be infinitely better if pinatas suddenly appeared throughout the day.



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