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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,270

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    No goats!!! I know too many escape artists, LOL!

    And Watermark Farm, I already have a harder keeper TB and even the HALF TB takes some work, hahaha, I sure don't want to pay to feed another one!!!
    Life doesn't have perfect footing.

    Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
    We Are Flying Solo



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 5, 2011
    Posts
    255

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    I always wondered if my hard keeper TBs could subsist mostly on pasture IF it was full of good grass. Guess not, huh? If you could find an easy keeping TB like the one I have now, that would probably be easiest.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,425

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTBs View Post
    I always wondered if my hard keeper TBs could subsist mostly on pasture IF it was full of good grass. Guess not, huh? If you could find an easy keeping TB like the one I have now, that would probably be easiest.
    I have had one TB that I brought in as a companion to my TB. Both horses were easy keepers and really only got a handful (1/4 cup) of grain with some beet pulp. Come summer I had to limit their time in the large pastures from ~ 10-12 hrs day to 5-7 hrs mostly because the companion was starting to look like a draft cross. I kept him through the winter to get his weight down and sent him home come spring. I remember his owner saying I must have very lush pasture that he put on so much weight. I told her that I maintain the pastures I have as best I can with spring and fall fertilizing, continual mowing to 4-6" max to keep weeds down and pasture rotation to allow the recently eaten pastures a chance to come back, just the way it should be done.

    I did much better with a hard keeper. If it cost me a few dollars more in grain, so be it but it was much better for both the horses, and I could afford it.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    4,501

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTBs View Post
    I always wondered if my hard keeper TBs could subsist mostly on pasture IF it was full of good grass. Guess not, huh? If you could find an easy keeping TB like the one I have now, that would probably be easiest.
    I was going to recommend a TB too. I have to limit my TB mare when she's on pasture because she will get fat. She loses weight over the winter, but I always hesitate to up her feed in the spring because she will blow up on pasture in about five minutes once the grass comes in.

    If not a TB or other "regular" horse, I'd still avoid ponies as grass pasture-mates. I have a Cushings pony and a mini (so, not *normal* ponies) but I have to be careful with them even in the "sacrifice" pasture that is nearly all dirt. Mid-summer, it still grows enough sparse grass to give them laminitis.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,915

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    Quote Originally Posted by Chall View Post
    If going for a companion, I think it's easier to have two of the same type. Either two hard keepers or two easy keepers. Thats independent of species horse/pony/donkey.
    Just my opinion.
    This, I had a companion Shetland pony out with my hard keepers, and it was very difficult. I have a very laid back situation here at home, and I find that to be a challenge. So I prefer all harder keepers, in that I can feed them a decent amount and not worry about them having issues or getting obese.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,448

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    Yes, managing ponies on grass together with a hard keeper....a big pain in the butt. I have done it (and currently do it) and would not recommend it unless there was no other option. Fostering for a rescue sounds like a great idea but... doesn't sound like you have a separate turnout option. I would want that if I was keeping a foster with a competition horse. Best bet might be advertising for a free lease companion where owner pays for vet/farrier etc. Lots of people with retired pasture sound horses would fall over themselves to find a situation like you would provide.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,731

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    Get a retiree or foster a rescue. I personally have some ponies (and a mini, and 3 goats) but I keep them off the good pasture. Mini is my one-eyed horse's BFF in the stall (yes, I stall them together) since he is used to living out and now has to be semi-stalled, causing super anxiety. Good luck.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,270

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    Quote Originally Posted by OTTBs View Post
    I always wondered if my hard keeper TBs could subsist mostly on pasture IF it was full of good grass.
    Well, according to mine, no way, LOL! He is 16.2 with plenty of bone and 9 years old. Even on GREAT pasture that is nearly endless, he still needs AT THE VERY MINIMUM 5 lbs of TC Complete a day and since he burns that in one eyeblink, I also keep him on a couple scoops of Cool Calories and in the past, on limited pasture, supplement with alfalfa and rice bran as needed.

    Sigh. Beast. So no -- NO HARD KEEPERS WANTED, haha. Just "normal" (I should know better in equine land, eh?).

    Thanks so much again for all your notes, they have definitely confirmed my ideas and added a new one. Horses are hard on pasture too, so trying to avoid adding new hooves beyond the minimum necessary.

    Yes, I'm a picky beast, hahaha, many years of experience with critters and small paycheck! Now I just have to be careful that my neighbour, who knows everyone and everything, doesn't leave some random donkey tied to my porch as a "gift"!
    Life doesn't have perfect footing.

    Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
    We Are Flying Solo



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,448

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    Just read your blog. Are you living in North Dakota? There is eventing not that far north of you. Come on up! http://www.manitobahorsetrials.com/
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    5,270

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    Me? Nooooo, I live in NC. That would be a long drive, but thanks for the invite!
    Life doesn't have perfect footing.

    Bloggily entertain yourself with our adventures (and disasters):
    We Are Flying Solo



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2003
    Location
    Wildwood, MO USA
    Posts
    2,599

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    Yes, ponies must be muzzled when the grass comes in. I had mine out on about 2 acres with three goats and she still is trying to founder. She's dry lotted now and moving much better. I would say if you have a companion pony it must be muzzled and you must have a way to separate to feed. My pony gets no grain and is very fat. They are tricky. Cute as a dickens though and I bought a little pony cart and harness and am having a great time with her. Oh, and friends can bring their kids over and she is great with them.
    -Painted Wings

    Set youself apart from the crowd, ride a paint horse, you're sure to be spotted


    1 members found this post helpful.

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