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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
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    2,285

    Default wood spacers for slat stalls?

    Hey, guys...
    My two interior stalls are the full kick front tongue groove...I'm trying to decide for the little mini stall I will 'add in' to one end of the run in, if I want full kick front, or if I want to try 'spacing' the slats to allow more air. How do you guys with stalls 'like that' do it? meaning: I'd still like to use the wall channel pieces to drop in the wood slats, but wanted input on how to 'add' spacers and what is safe, etc...since, yes, this will be in the run in and will have 'exterior' exposed to the big horses using the run in...

    I just hate to have her not be able to 'see out' and have the small area have less air flow.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    Default

    Spacers are usually just a short piece of the same wood you are using, at least the stalls I've seen that are vertical oak boards. T&G would work great for horizontal, maybe with a little toenail to keep the short bits from moving.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  3. #3
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    Mar. 14, 2007
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    Default

    thank you, Re! So, I want to use horizontal, not sure yet (because of not knowing what is best) if it would be oak boards or T&G. But...either way: are you saying I 'cut' little square blocks of same product all the same size and drop those in the channel on top of each full size board? Can you help me know: is there a recommended safe 'size' to do this (height) and is there a way/important part of keeping those spacers from 'moving?'...(as again, I want to use the channel idea to drop the horizontal boards into. ) do I need only one at each end of the wall or ???
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  4. #4
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    Default

    The ones I've seen in horse stalls are vertical. They frame up a bottom half with a rail at about 4 feet high, and plate the bottom with alternating rail height and full height oak boards that are about 4 inches wide, so it creates a grille effect above the rail.

    I haven't ever seen the horizontal with spaces used in horse stalls, just in garden architectural type stuff, where they want the airy effect. Horizontal winds up being longer and more subject to flexing, so theoretically your horse could get a body part wedged in there and get hurt. If you were to experiment I'd try it with 50 % of the material, T&G, in foot or two segments, toenailed together, toenailing is driving a fastener at an angle to catch two pieces of wood and keep the lower part solid.
    I have seen horizontal into end caps before, but it was ceiling height T&G, no spaces.

    Thinking about it I believe that having that many exposed horizontal wood surfaces lends itself to being chewed or cribbed on, and that is why all the ones I've seen have been vertical.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    41,729

    Default

    You could use a router and shave down a bit on each side of each slat and so have air flow "vents".

    Here is a picture of the Legend series of Classic Equine stalls incorporating that feature.
    Those are full sized boards, trimmed a very little in the middle.
    Looks very classy:
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  6. #6
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    Those are nice looking. Question about how they'd survive a hard kick though without the T's and the G's to disperse the impact.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    I have what you are talking about - T&G to 4 feet, then regular 2x6s to 9', spaced. I have a 2" block of wood I just stick into the groove. They aren't much deeper than the U channel, so they aren't going to just come out. The long boards are a snug fit, so it's very, very unlikely anyone is going to get any of them lifted up. If it was of a real concern, then screw a block of wood at the top of the U channel, into the post.

    2" is a good size. No adult horse's hoof is going to fit in there, or even a really a pony hoof. A foal hoof could, so either raise the level of the T&G, or just make the space 1.5".

    I also have a mid-section vertical metal stabilizer imbedded into the ground a little, and screwed into about every other horizontal board to help with the stabilization.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 10, 2003
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    Default

    I've done the same as ReSomething; just take a little narrow bit of the same wood and slide that into the channel in between the boards to leave a gap. If you are doing them in kicking range then I wouldn't do a whole board's width, because a foot could fit through.

    PSA about T & G walls made in this manner: Don't leave the boards loose to slide in and out through the channel at the top! They need to be screwed in place somehow. I didn't think of them being loose as a problem until I saw a mare kick the wall just-so, such that her toe hit the seam between two boards and her foot and leg went in between the boards, which of course slid back down and trapped her leg in the wall. VERY VERY BAD scene.
    As Peter, Paul, and Mary say, a dragon lives forever.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
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    Default

    Thanks! Bluey, those are pretty! hadn't thought of that....JB, yes, that sounds about right, but of course as I want these to 'be' the bottom 'kick' area I will have to be concerned / careful with the safe space. Actually, (and this will be hard for you guys to envision, I know) I am using these panels : http://www.tractorsupply.com/en/stor...-ft-w-x-6-ft-h But they are only the 'frame' for each portion. they'll be 'attached' to each other with 2x8s vertical that will be one running vertical on each side of the vertical edges...those bolted to low overhead roof runners, and also bolted to 4x4s making the outline space on the floor. the, channels attached and the horizontal dropped in on the 'exterior' face in the run in. (and capped at top) Leaving the full screen behind them on the mini's inside stall, and a kick reinforced 1/2 way up on the outside of the mini's stall. The panels were very reasonable, can be used for a lot of things and just right for this area (lower roofline) to make a mini stall. My run in is already matted edge to edge, so I didn't want to dig up for footings, as well as I want one I can 'take back apart' at any point...But, didn't want to JUST use the full mesh panels as I knew folks would question? that safety with the big horses outside the stall / inside the run in. So I thought of the half wall kick panel, but I knew it would block off all exterior view for the mini, and wondered about safe spacing.

    http://i594.photobucket.com/albums/t...psfaba8145.jpg here is the run in , where you can see the 'lower roof' side that would be perfect for the mini stall....I'm using the panels as mentioned so 'stall' will end up being about 5 ftx 10-11 ft. or so.
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
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    Cocoa, Fla
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    Default

    Spcing between slats needs to be large enough for the largest hoof to be easily extracted - so if horses "kicks" at neighbor they can pull their leg out (between slats) without the leg getting trapped.
    Sandy in Fla.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
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    Default

    As a kid, I had horizontal slat stall walls set in a channel. The 1" spacers were secured. No chance any hoof could have gotten stuck in the 1" space between slats.



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