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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    45,866

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    Go to the police and ask what is your legal situation there.
    Mention another neighbor is scared for their kids.

    They should tell you what you can do, or they may come by and tell your neighbor themselves what it needs to do, saving you the trouble.

    Our sheriff would do just that, I think.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    10,367

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    I live out in the county, and the Sheriff' department is also animal control, so they would definitely be the ones to talk to problem pet owners. I think the person to talk to the neighbor would vary according to how the animal control, or problem animal statutes are written where you are.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2010
    Location
    Bozeman, MT
    Posts
    671

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    I'm really disappointed that the OP is getting a plethora responses advising to shoot the dog (with various guns and sprays) before anyone has even tried to talk to the owners!?!?! OP describes less than ideal living conditions for the dog - it sounds very sad, in honesty. First course of action is to contact them and make friends with your neighbors, even if you can't stand them. Honestly, I'm feeling terribly for the dog. Please, please, please, make every effort to go introduce yourself and ingratiate yourself and your family with the owners. This dog didn't ask to be in this position and while you have said he is aggressive and THAT IS SCARY AND DANGEROUS, maybe you can help to make his situation better and safer...for him and you.

    And why on earth would you wait for there to be a next time? Go meet these people before there is a next time and try to come to an amicable arrangement.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    6,731

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    I've been shooting dogs with bb guns for about 30 years now. I don't imbed them with bb's, just pop them.

    I don't go raise hell with the neighbors b/c the neighbors don't care. They know their dog is running loose and edgy, they're ok with that. When you are the new neighbor that shows up with the "law on their side" you immediately alienate yourself from the neighborhood, 9 times out of 10.

    Duh, you don't get CAUGHT shooting the dog with the bb gun!

    Train the dog, not the neighbors. It's much easier and more effective.

    Bear pepper spray is not always the best tool for the job, I would almost rather have a good squirt gun with lemon juice or something. Friendly fire hurts.
    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    45,866

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    Quote Originally Posted by showidaho View Post
    I'm really disappointed that the OP is getting a plethora responses advising to shoot the dog (with various guns and sprays) before anyone has even tried to talk to the owners!?!?! OP describes less than ideal living conditions for the dog - it sounds very sad, in honesty. First course of action is to contact them and make friends with your neighbors, even if you can't stand them. Honestly, I'm feeling terribly for the dog. Please, please, please, make every effort to go introduce yourself and ingratiate yourself and your family with the owners. This dog didn't ask to be in this position and while you have said he is aggressive and THAT IS SCARY AND DANGEROUS, maybe you can help to make his situation better and safer...for him and you.

    And why on earth would you wait for there to be a next time? Go meet these people before there is a next time and try to come to an amicable arrangement.
    Sounds like another neighbor already did meet them and warned them he would shoot the dog if it came near kids.
    The dog is still running loose, so maybe is time to see what the authorities there have to say?



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    5,020

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    If you want to go the passive route:

    You could work with the dog (bring food) and train him to go to the back of the fence, or lie down on command in the kennel (good training for when he's free).

    Buy the neighbor better fencing and bury the fence into the ground so he cant dig out (cheaper than fencing 40 acres).

    Find if vets give discounted coupons for neutering, give them to neighbor.

    Bring/leave the neighbor cookies as a welcome gift, so your first encounter is friendly and open the lines of communication. This should actually be #1 on the list.

    Find resources for rehoming the dog, the neighbors may actually find the dog as much a pita as you.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    May. 4, 2006
    Location
    Seabeck on the Hood Canal
    Posts
    4,379

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    Do not feed the owners dog, or interact with it. Talk to the people, leave a note and report to authorities, every time. If all else fails, a warning letter from an attorney will help loads but I think the authorities need to know that there is already one neighbor afraid for the children and the dog has been on your property, and has threatened you, your dogs and your wife asap.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep. 24, 2007
    Location
    Georgia
    Posts
    478

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    I just recently went through the neighbor dog issue (have had problems with 3 of our neighbors and their dogs). My adult horses took care of one neighbors dog, kicked the crap out of it for trying to bark/chase the horses and taught the dog a valuable lesson, the other two, pit bulls that chased two of my younger horses over a gait were warned that if caught again they would be shot (dogs disappeared not to be seen again, I did not SSS, though GA law says I can shoot if they are harassing my livestock) and the last they have worked with me, their dog (thankfully she is pretty small 30 lbs or so) was in with my new born foal inside fencing that was put up to keep dogs out. We electrified it on the outside and they have been keeping her up when working close to our property which is the only time she comes over. We did have a bit of heated conversation, of course he did not say anything to my husband when he went over originally about the dog! only to me out of hearing from anyone else! but since then have had no trouble and he has thanked me for working with them rather than just getting rid of the dog.

    I would talk with the owner first, if they are anything like my neighbors they are not too clued in to bad behavior of their animals. I would also find out what laws in your state are on dogs coming onto your property harassing you, your livestock and your pets. You can also carry a cattle prod, nice little jolt of electricity to make him change his mind. I like to carry a dressage whip myself with loose dogs while walking my leashed pets. Also, make a complaint to AC/sheriff, have it on the record in case something does happen.



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