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  1. #21
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    OP, I think a fundraiser is totally fine in your situation. I wish you all the best.

    It is not uncommon to be denied SSI disability the first time through, in fact it is standard for them to deny most everyone according to my friends who do that kind of work, but do NOT give up -- get a lawyer. Contact Legal Aid if you fit in the parameters, hire one if you don't. In fact, you ought to get a lawyer ASAP because the quicker you can get on Medicaid, the better. And the lawyer can see if there are any arguments for retroactive application. I don't know much (anything) about SSI but worth asking about, anyway.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  2. #22
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    Nov. 1, 1999
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    Shangri-LA
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    Perhaps your family and friends could have a fund drive dinner, bake sales, yard sales to help raise some cash for your immediate medical costs?
    "My treasures do not chink or gleam, they glitter in the sun and neigh at night."
    ~Gypsy saying


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
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    Sep. 16, 2008
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    What js said is a great idea! When I was in Pony Club we would have an annual garage sale. Everyone in the club would bring all the items to one house that had lots of traffic, we advertised a bunch ahead of time and got a lot of shoppers. It is a fairly easy way to make money, while helping others clean out their garages, items get recycled, buyers get great deals and OP could get some funds for her medical bills. Any leftover items can either go back to their owner or be donated to a worthy cause. It also has the benefit of being a little less flashy than a big fundraiser and there is no reason why you could not do it more than once. I don't know how much money you need, but it might be a nice boost, I think the Pony Club did very well with it. Just an idea!

    I also think the blog is a great idea!

    I hope things turn around for you soon OP, it sounds like a battle every day.
    Impossible is nothing.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    OP, ignore the naysayers who have never been through devastating medical problems. They don't have a clue.

    Jingles.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    3 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
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    Sep. 9, 2007
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    Charleston, SC
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    I have no issue in letting your family do a fund raiser. I have seen tons of fundraisers come from people having medical issues. People want to help but don't always know how. Having an event to raise money is a great idea. and if people wnt to contribute they will.

    I have been on short and long term disability and had thousands of dollars in uncovered medical bills. I know how hard it is. It took me YEARS to pay those off. My family helped me when they could. I got very sick with a MRSA infection that had me in the hospital and rehab center for 8 weeks. It came out of the blue and nothing that could be planned for.
    OTTB - Hurricane Denton - Kane AKA Bubble boy
    Boxer - Tugger's - outlasted my marriage


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Jan. 19, 2014
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    Quote Originally Posted by chillydc View Post
    What js said is a great idea! When I was in Pony Club we would have an annual garage sale. Everyone in the club would bring all the items to one house that had lots of traffic, we advertised a bunch ahead of time and got a lot of shoppers. It is a fairly easy way to make money, while helping others clean out their garages, items get recycled, buyers get great deals and OP could get some funds for her medical bills. Any leftover items can either go back to their owner or be donated to a worthy cause. It also has the benefit of being a little less flashy than a big fundraiser and there is no reason why you could not do it more than once. I don't know how much money you need, but it might be a nice boost, I think the Pony Club did very well with it. Just an idea!

    I also think the blog is a great idea!

    I hope things turn around for you soon OP, it sounds like a battle every day.
    I love this idea!

    I get a fair number of links to fundraisers for medical or veterinary bills via facebook. I don't donate. My choice is to send my money to actual charities, like local homeless shelters or religious mission trips.

    I don't personally think direct fundraising is appropriate much of the time. I would make major sacrifices before resorting to begging for money - like selling my house & moving into an apartment, definitely giving away or selling any horses, selling off valuables, using retirement funds, etc. If you're wearing a $5,000 ring and begging for $5,000 for your dog's surgery... well, I can do the math

    My views on a garage sale or raffle are a little different since you're actually doing something other than directly begging for money. I would still be hesitant to do that, but I would if I were desperate. And it sounds like you're reaching that point.

    Definitely reapply to SSDI using a lawyer. From what you've posted, you should definitely be eligible!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Dec. 28, 2001
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    over yonder
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    Quote Originally Posted by SFrost View Post
    I'd also like to donate a portion of my donation to research on Chronic Pancreatitis. Even if it is a small donation, I feel like it would be the right thing to do.
    I have no problem with the idea of doing a fund raiser, but are you talking about giving a portion of the money raised to charity?

    Personally, I do not think that is a good idea unless it is clearly stated upfront. If people are donating, it is because they want to donate to you. If they want to donate to the charity they will but that should be their choice. Of course, it wouldn't be a bad thing to have some information about the charity available
    Auventera Two:Some women would eat their own offspring if they had some dipping sauce.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    It's not mutually exclusive, OP, I can still send some money and still try to help you get a transplant.

    When the owner of our feedstore died suddenly years ago, she was in her 40s, our local grocery store in that little town, part of a South Carolina/GA chain, donated ALL of the food to have a spaghetti supper to help pay for funeral expenses. One woman and her nephew did all the cooking. Sp your relatives can check with local/chain grocery stores to see if they will help out in having a takeout dinner for fund raising.

    This is why we need Obamacare. OK I was a big Hiliary supporter so I guess if she had gotten it done when Bill was president, it would have been Clintoncare. Our country should make sure that no one goes without free heath care and no one goes hungry. (What a radical thought, to take care of our citizens.) I "know" people on Coth who won't work, and are healthy. OP has worked and her husband works. There's nothing wrong with owning horses when you are ill. When one Cother was dying from ovarian cancer, we all helped to get back the horses she'd consigned to a person who was not nice, and people helped sell and rehome the horses. I'm still ticked off at the Cother who said that another Cother, a teacher, should not own a horse if she couldn't pay for a catastrophic illness for the horse. If no one understands, OP's illness is very painful, and is terminal if she doesn't get good healthcare, and even then, she's going to need a transplant if the recent experimental transplants prove successful. Give OP a break, she's very ill.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    OP, ignore the naysayers who have never been through devastating medical problems. They don't have a clue.

    Jingles.
    Laura knows. She and her husband had paid a fortune for their daughter's medical bills. And now the daughter is back in the hospital again. People don't know just how lucky they are to be healthy. Laura's daughter has worked all through her adult illnesses. This could happen to anyone, anytime. And when you are in constant pain, actually physical pain, as OP is almost all the time, you cannot work. Pancretitis and pancreatic illnesses are very painful, according to what I've actually seen with friends and with one of my aussies. It's not a dull pain, it's an acute and violent pain with throwing up bile, from the bile ducts. Having a pancreas that does not work properly is a life-threatening illness. I'ts not a "gee, I don't want to work because I feel bad" excuse as some Cothers have used. So think of ways that OP can get money to pay off those bills.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
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    Jun. 22, 2012
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    I don't think it's totally fair to say that the naysayers must not know what it's like to experience a serious illness. Rather, I think some of the negative responses come from people who went through illness or disaster and didn't feel like they could ask for help.

    I have to admit, as someone who was seriously ill growing up and never considered asking for donations, my own kneejerk reaction to the OP's post was negative. I think it comes from a place of jealousy; of, "Why should she get money donated to her when I had to tough it out on my own?" So...I don't know. Perhaps my reaction says more about me than the OP.

    Mostly, I just wish we lived in a country where these kinds of treatments and procedures didn't have to be largely privately funded.

    I wish the OP all the best.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Mar. 26, 2006
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    Chiming in late on this one, but I agree, if you have family and friends who want to help you out, just go for it.

    The raffle is a great idea. Combine it with a cookout or barbeque, maybe see if an acquaintance would provide some kind of entertainment? In other words, make it a party! People are often happy to help in small ways for things like that.

    Here's an example: A few months back I attended an event held to raise money for a local cyclist who was run down from behind. His medical bills were astronomical, even with insurance. A local bar agreed to host, and donated 10% of their proceeds to the cause. The local bike shops donated bikes and gear for a raffle. The local brewery donated kegs of beer to sell. The cycling community got the word out via Facebook, and there was a heck of a party that night! I'm not sure how much money was raised, but it seemed like a lot.

    OTOH, I've also donated directly to people I "know" online through their blogs. If anyone else ever followed "Fat Cyclist" you'll know that he chronicled his wife's struggle with cancer. At one point, when it was clear she was terminal, and after multiple people asked how they could help, he put up a fundraising site. I believe his wording was something like "proceeds go to buying my wife anything she wants that will make her happy". I definitely contributed to that fund. It seemed a small thing to do to try to ease someone's way.



  12. #32
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    As C&C says, we've been through the wringer, medically and financially. I'm not jealous, if someone wants to throw a fundraiser, why not? You don't have to donate if you don't want to.

    I just don't get the "I didn't get it, so no one else should" attitude. Never have, never will.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


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  13. #33
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    Oct. 26, 2005
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    Deep South
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    As someone who DID have to cash in retirement and has NO savings due to theeconomy and job loss combined with three serious surgeries, I have mixed emotions about your situation. At least you have a husband, an income, insurance and the option for surgery which might make you healthier. If your family and close friends wish to contribute to your bank account, that just makes you very very lucky indeed. i wish you the best.
    SPAY/NEUTER/RESCUE/ADOPT!
    Little Star Chihuahua Rescue
    The Barkalicious Bakery
    On Facebook!!!


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  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan. 22, 2003
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    Home of "The Office", PA
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    Since this thread got resurrected, how are you doing, OP?

    Did you family do any of the fundraisers?

    It may sound weird, but what about crowd sourcing (like GoFundMe.com)? There is a recent thread on here about the dumb things that people ask money for (my show fees because I KNOW I'm the next Reed Kessler if only someone would discover me, my new digital camera because photography is my passion and mine is getting old, a horse because I have a passion for horses and MUST have one....). Yours does not seem like a dumb, selfish request. What can it hurt?


    The cash/don't cash retirement argument seems silly....if people are willing to put on a fundraiser for the OP, why should she have to cash in retirement savings first before fundraising is deemed "appropriate"? Just because some people did, doesn't make it necessary for everyone. Bills aren't going to stop when the OP gets better and even then it will take time to get back on her feet financially. Plus, God willing, we all will need some of that retirement money when we are all old and feeble.
    The only thing the government needs to solve all of its problems is a Council of Common Sense.


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  15. #35
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    Jan. 20, 2008
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    642

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dramapony_misty View Post
    Since this thread got resurrected, how are you doing, OP?

    Did you family do any of the fundraisers?

    It may sound weird, but what about crowd sourcing (like GoFundMe.com)? There is a recent thread on here about the dumb things that people ask money for (my show fees because I KNOW I'm the next Reed Kessler if only someone would discover me, my new digital camera because photography is my passion and mine is getting old, a horse because I have a passion for horses and MUST have one....). Yours does not seem like a dumb, selfish request. What can it hurt?


    The cash/don't cash retirement argument seems silly....if people are willing to put on a fundraiser for the OP, why should she have to cash in retirement savings first before fundraising is deemed "appropriate"? Just because some people did, doesn't make it necessary for everyone. Bills aren't going to stop when the OP gets better and even then it will take time to get back on her feet financially. Plus, God willing, we all will need some of that retirement money when we are all old and feeble.
    Thanks for asking. I'm doing so so. I was doing ok for a bit but had some issues in the past month. One hospitalization and and ER trip yesterday. But, it is what it is. My family is apparently still planning a fundraiser for later this year in my hometown. (And for those that have stated about being up front about anything being donated to a foundation, clearly it would be.)

    I've started a website and will be slowly working on that, not for fundraisers for myself but later on for pancreatic diseases. It will be a way for people who are diagnosed to share through an online group, get new research presented in on place, a way for me to share how I'm doing and things I've been through. I know I've looked for that type of thing when having a new treatment or symptoms present and it can be hard to find. Since I am really open about what happens with my disease I hope it can help someone. I know how isolated I feel, and if I can help one person NOT feel that then that's a huge success.

    As for some of the judgement this thread brought about, well, whatever. I mean, I get what people are saying but then again no one really knows what it is like to be me and live my life. No situation is ever the same. So, if my family wants to put something on, great. Let them have at it. If people want to help, awesome. If not, that's ok too. All I know is that even with being very fortunate and my husband having a good job we've really struggled. But, what doesn't kill us makes us stronger. Or so I keep telling myself.


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  16. #36
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    The board is wonky and rejected my post.

    Go with the fundraiser. Hope you feel better. Tell me when I can spend some $.



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