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  1. #1
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    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
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    Great idea, but what about RoadID?

    Edited to add: USEA says RoadIDs are OK. Seems kind of strange since RoadID doesn't store your medical info online and RideSafe does -- so the advantage would be RideSafe in that sense, but as Gallop says below, not every place has internet access.
    Last edited by FrittSkritt; Mar. 3, 2014 at 12:37 PM.
    -my life-
    Translation
    fri [fri:] fritt fria (adj): Free
    skritt [skrit:] skritten (noun): Walk



  3. #3
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    I'm interested in the different options and if they're allowed.



  4. #4
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    I adore the different colors, but my sole concern about them is that they require an internet connection to access the information. In my area, there are still rural spots where an internet connection via cell phone is not a thing. The last thing I want a medical official to be doing while they are trying to get me help is wandering around looking for a signal.

    You can call in too, it looks like, but apart from the fact that cell phones don't always work, again, I don't want someone to be sprinting to the barn landline to get my info, when the alternative is having it taped right to my arm, clearly accessible.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Middleburg, VA
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    After my crash, I'm not even sure why we bother wearing anything at all. I had my armband (duh) and my RideSafe on. Neither was even glanced at. I mean, I WAS conscious and lucid AND had someone on the ground who knew my history. But, really, if I'd been unconscious, I'd rather them take care of me than take time to go over my info....Internet connection or not.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Jun. 29, 2002
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    YB-This has been my contention all along. As a first responder, I don't give a rats ass about the damn armband or road ID or whatever.....There is NO info on there that is helpful in an emergency situation.
    ~Run and Jump!~


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Feb. 1, 2008
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    RoadID has an option to store information online.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Dec. 9, 2011
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    GoForAGallop, I think your concerns are very valid. I'd still like more info though, because this is something I might wear on a daily basis while riding instead of just at shows.

    Their website, however, sucks. You have to not only register, but also fill out the info you'd want on the bracelet, before you even get a price. ($35, if anyone else is curious.) Then, I had to go to the FAQ section to learn that there is a $3 annual subscription fee, and what the bracelet is made of (hypoallergenic silicone.) (I also see that they have more info on bracelet pricing there, but really, I shouldn't have to do digging in the FAQ section to find a price.)

    I actually think the annual subscription fee is quite reasonable and wouldn't prevent me going this route, but they really need a new web design that makes this basic info easier to find.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Jan. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcjumper View Post
    YB-This has been my contention all along. As a first responder, I don't give a rats ass about the damn armband or road ID or whatever.....There is NO info on there that is helpful in an emergency situation.
    Agreed. Unless you have a major allergy or other issue---in which case, a different sort of alert tag might be helpful.

    But I will likely order one of the RideSafe bands as I hate the arm bands.
    ** The difference between genius and stupidity is genius has its limits. -- Albert Einstein **


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 27, 2001
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    Washington, DC
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    I have been leary of the bracelet due to
    a) what if no cell connection?
    b) what if company goes out of business (although I guess then I just go back to armband...)

    but...I have a hard time getting my armband to stay put (little arms), and like others, like the idea of a bracelet that I would really wear every day.

    For those of you who wear it, can you put ICE info there so if some random stranger finds you by the side of the road, they could call your emergency contact as well as 911?

    That might be nice.

    If it's really true that any of these things are of limited value to true first responders, then I like the bracelet idea in terms of hacking out and so on if it could be used by just a passerby....
    The big man -- no longer an only child

    His new little brother



  11. #11
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    My bracelet has two ICE numbers on it right on the front. I got mine because I was hacking out, alone and on the roads so much.



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snugglerug View Post
    Then, I had to go to the FAQ section to learn that there is a $3 annual subscription fee, and what the bracelet is made of (hypoallergenic silicone.)
    That's the main reason I prefer the RoadID -- it's available in a nylon web band... after wearing silicone supporters bands for years I get a bit tired of the sweaty mess they leave behind. ;-)
    -my life-
    Translation
    fri [fri:] fritt fria (adj): Free
    skritt [skrit:] skritten (noun): Walk


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
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    Feb. 1, 2008
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    You can put pretty much anything on them. I have the RoadID without the online connection and I think it holds 5 or 6 lines worth of information. I wear it to run in and kind of figure it's more of an identify the body type deal-- but I also don't have any major allergies/ medical conditions.

    Quote Originally Posted by asterix View Post
    I have been leary of the bracelet due to
    a) what if no cell connection?
    b) what if company goes out of business (although I guess then I just go back to armband...)

    but...I have a hard time getting my armband to stay put (little arms), and like others, like the idea of a bracelet that I would really wear every day.

    For those of you who wear it, can you put ICE info there so if some random stranger finds you by the side of the road, they could call your emergency contact as well as 911?

    That might be nice.

    If it's really true that any of these things are of limited value to true first responders, then I like the bracelet idea in terms of hacking out and so on if it could be used by just a passerby....


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
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    Apr. 15, 2003
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    Northeast MA
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    After a nasty fall (on my own property, thank goodness) that resulted in TONS of confusion at the hospital when my DH could neither remember what my allergies were nor my preexisting conditions, my sister gave me a med bracelet. It's the C-A-R-E version, and it's essentially a flash drive* in a protected rubber bracelet. One can put info on it and update it anytime from any PC platform, and it can be read on either Apple or PC. Therefore, it doesn't require internet, just something that will take a flash drive*.

    * Hope I'm using the right term. Could be a USB. I'm computer illiterate!

    Anyway, almost every healthcare provider in this neck of the woods, and even first responders now have some modality that accepts this info source. It isn't pretty by any means, but I wear it religiously.

    But as far as the USEA accepting something other than armbands, are volunteers now going to have to check bracelets before allowing a competitor even in jumping warmups? The advantage of the armband was it was easy for all to see.
    They don't call me frugal for nothing.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Thanks guys -- looking at Road ID and think I might get this.

    annie, good point - it will mean slightly more work as the bracelet would be less visible then the armband, but you can easily slide your sleeve up and show you've got one when asked. Steward will have to ask or competitors will have to get used to showing it when they check in.
    The big man -- no longer an only child

    His new little brother



  16. #16
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    I feel like USEA should have vetted all of this before they released the rule change -- there are so many options out there, with varying levels of information available. Based on them using RideSafe as the example, it would seem like they want us to only use ones that have medical info online...?
    -my life-
    Translation
    fri [fri:] fritt fria (adj): Free
    skritt [skrit:] skritten (noun): Walk



  17. #17
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    May. 26, 2011
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    I don't see any real advantage of the bracelet versus the arm band. So I'll stick with the armband. This is what I am going to get for riding by myself.

    https://icedot.org/site/crash-sensor/
    "I couldn't find my keys, so I put her in the trunk"



  18. #18
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    Medical bracelets must be visible on the competitor’s wrist. Medical cards must include any relevant medical history, injury (particularly to the head), drug allergies and current medication. If wearing a medical bracelet, any relevant medical history injury (particularly to the head), drug allergies and current medication must be included in the online medical form of the bracelet’s vendor website. Athletes are responsible to record all injuries on the card or in the case of a medical bracelet, update their medical information online. Failure to wear one’s own medical card or bracelet shall be penalized by a fine of $100 (payable to the Organizing Committee).”
    Ride Safe ID bracelets may be worn instead of the traditional medical armband. They are an easy, comfortable way to wear your medical information on your wrist, and are designed to be worn all day, every day.
    Bolding mine.

    Does this imply your bracelet must have an online form available? The RoadID ones have a higher annual fee but cheaper initially and I like the band better. I don't have any major history/allergies/drugs so I'm not sure I necessarily need the online form, but they don't know that- and if it's required, the RideSafe is a better deal at $3/year.



  19. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by xcjumper View Post
    YB-This has been my contention all along. As a first responder, I don't give a rats ass about the damn armband or road ID or whatever.....There is NO info on there that is helpful in an emergency situation.
    I don't know, I run on rural roads and do not carry my driver's license. If I were to get hit or something, obviously, yes, stabilize me first. But you would have no idea who I was or who to contact to tell I was in the hospital if I weren't wearing my Road ID- it has my name and my emergency contact info. To me, those are important things to have in an emergency situation. Ok, so my blood type's on there... I get that that's pretty much useless, but the name and phone numbers are why I won't run without my bracelet.
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

    Equi-Sport Services


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
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    Feb. 23, 2009
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    The Road ID online ones look like this:
    http://autopilotlegs.files.wordpress...08/roadid1.jpg

    This is the one I have, it has my name, year of birth, blood type, allergies, organ donor status and 2 emergency contact numbers for my DH and dad, and it's no bigger than a standard "livestrong" type band.

    https://www.roadid.com/p/the-Wrist-ID-Slim
    If it were easy, everybody would do it.

    Equi-Sport Services



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