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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2013
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    48

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    I taught my 7 yr old flying changes and am quite proud of how they are coming. It took us a good 3-4 months - of course some of it was this winter where we didn't ride a lot because of the cold. Lots and lots of canter work and canter lateral work - he is a big guy - 18hh - here is a video of our first run through our Level 3 test 1 canter/changes - this was taken a few weeks ago and it is getting better every day.

    I will say this though - It made a huge difference having him in a double - he loves the changes and would take over and then take off afterwards. A tiny bit of curb before and after the changes really helped me.

    Getting him to wait for the clue was hard. I had never ridden a horse that could do clean changes before so it was a bit of blind leading the blind with a great coach.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NHThd...ThLmXg&index=1
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  2. #22
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2013
    Posts
    206

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    Thanks again for the replies… I love hearing your sucsess stories! hayfeeder your boy is very cute!

    Good news is we got a clean change each way today!!!!! I am so excited, we were having a jumping lesson and we tried some the "jumping way" over a pole, that seemed to make more sense to her, so I will take it!

    I wish I had access to a school master but that isn't really an option, and half changes are usually late in front… I just have to bumble through these the best I can!

    thanks for sharing your stories!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Posts
    1,890

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    My success has been sending my horse to my trainer I was struggling too...she insists on training changes as if the horse is going to do tempi's...which she did do with him yesterday. I ride him three times a week with her support. She rides him the other three days. I have learned a lot but the biggest thing I learned is I was not capable of doing it with my own riding. He is a big boy and I am no spring chicken.
    If you don't have that kind of help seek out the Karl Mikolka website and buy some of his exercises. They are a great foundation for teaching changes.


    Good news is we got a clean change each way today!!!!! I am so excited, we were having a jumping lesson and we tried some the "jumping way" over a pole, that seemed to make more sense to her, so I will take it!
    this way won't help in the future, it's the foundation of how you get the straightness to the change, not bending over a pole.
    "When you think you don't need a coach ...then you're in trouble" Don Imus 2012



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Mar. 28, 2006
    Posts
    1,890

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    I saw a very interesting exercise at the Stephen Clarke clinic last weekend to school changes. Mr. Clarke suggested not doing the change until you could move the shoulders where you wanted them; he had the riders practice cantering (and counter cantering) while moving the horse's shoulders to either side (with the same amount of bend used for a proper shoulder in.)

    Once the rider could move the shoulders to either side effectively without losing the quality of the canter, he had them create that shoulder in position before asking for the change. They were all clean if that was done properly.
    good advice...the shoulders play a big part in my changes...especially considering the stiff and hollow sides of the horse. My horse pops his left shoulder if I am not careful
    "When you think you don't need a coach ...then you're in trouble" Don Imus 2012



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 16, 2006
    Location
    Larkspur, Colo.
    Posts
    4,842

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    This Jane Savoie video has some good exercises:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UCpT_4bHoY0



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2002
    Posts
    4,926

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    Quote Originally Posted by HicksteadFan View Post
    Well for me we just started going down the center line and trying to get a change at the end. It was not a very structured plan. I was in lessons then. One day my horse just understood and got 6 or 8 in a row. For a while after, every time I rode her that was like her new thing. She would do flying lead changes while we were going straight on the rail. Once she got over that though she does them by herself now if I didn't catch it.
    If I could redo it though, I would start by doing simple changes. Turn in a canter, trot after the turn, pick up the opposite lead and then turn back onto the rail. Just to get them thinking about switching left then right. Do less and less trot in between the canters. A canter pole can help because it gives them more time to change. And like the 2nd reply says they can help if the horse doesn't get the back lead. I know many ponies that have trouble getting the back.
    Just a tiny correction: A "simple change" is canter/walk/canter, a change through trot is just that. Good idea to have the simple change perfected before attempting the flying change. ;-) I don't think that ponies should have any more difficulty getting the back to change(quite the opposite, actually) other than the fact that we put kids on them way too early and they don't get the good, thorough training they need from the very beginning. jmho



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2006
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    2,220

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    I know many ponies that have trouble getting the back.


    LOL, I didn't catch that comment and I agree with Dune. Having been a pony jock all my life and riding both hunters (long time ago) and dressage, I don't find that the ponies have trouble with the change in the back if ridden properly, it's the lack of proper set up (training) that is the cause for the challenge.

    I have a pony who many like to accuse of being ground bound. I was told that he would never learn how to change (flying) because of this; so, I worked on improving the quality of the canter and training him towards developing more suspension overall. He has no problem doing proper flying changes as long as I insure that he's straight, supple (longitudinally AND laterally) and I ride him with a quick hind leg (um that means I have to work harder and perfect my timing to get that).
    Ranch of Last Resort
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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2010
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    282

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    I agree with exvet. Quality of canter needs to be there, with a quick hind leg. They must be straight and supple. Easy, right? LOL. It actually becomes very easy if you follow this format. One of my horses was very easy to make a nice change. My PSG horse struggled for a long time sine he had the jumper change from being an event horse for so many years. He struggled with staying in a quality canter that would jump instead of the flatter one you jump from. Then, he struggled with remaining straight. His shoulders would pop out anticipating the change. Now the tempes are our bread and butter as my trainer claims. The one thing I can say is if you have one anticipating or stealing the change , don't let them. Wait it out until the tension is gone through their back and they are working off your seat. Otherwise the change can be late, short, or croup high. This type of horse has to learn to wait. My younger horse is almost ready to start introducing the change. She will be one that will stay straight and supple, but will need to be reminded to keep the hind leg quick. I think she will be much easier because we will teach her the dressage change first. I know some people feel it is the same as the jumper one, but I feel they are different canters. The jumper change comes from a flatter canter. It is a timed event, and jumping from a collected dressage canter would not only waste too much time, but would change your distances too much riding in a collected canter.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2006
    Location
    Coastal New England
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    469

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    I disagree that a jumper would have a much flatter canter. A hunter, perhaps, but I would expect any decent jumper to be able to collect, sit, and "jump" in the stride as well as a dressage horse learning changes. Less finesse and precision, perhaps, but I know I don't want to navigate a jumper course with a "flat" canter.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan. 1, 2010
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    282

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    I didn't mean flat, just flatter than a 3rd level collected canter.



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 15, 2012
    Posts
    143

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    I love this video from Jane Savoie. It breaks down the aids so simply and made a huge difference for me.

    http://savoiedressageacademy.com/pro...lying-changes/



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr. 7, 2013
    Posts
    206

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    Those videos are great! I haven't been able to play around with the new information yet because my horse caught a cold and all we are doing is taking temperatures and wiping noses at the moment, but I am excited to get back on and try those things!



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