The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 1 of 16 12311 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 20 of 316
  1. #1

    Default Lunch room food restrictions gone too far?

    A friend of mine got a letter from the (elementary) school requesting that children do not pack lunches containing any of the following:

    wheat and wheat gluten-containing products, dairy, eggs or egg products, seafood, nuts of any kind, strawberries, kiwis, citrus, tomatoes, soy


    School does not provide lunches (this is in Canada, I don't know if that's the norm up there). There is a no-sharing policy at lunch breaks. So parents are expected to pack lunches with none of the above ingredients.

    Now, I understand the concern about air-born allergens and would be willing to cooperate with that - like no peanut butter sandwiches. But has anyone ever died from sitting beside someone eating a cheese sandwich? Is this going way too far?
    http://www.tbhsa.com/index.html

    Originally Posted by JSwan
    I love feral children. They taste like chicken.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,511

    Default

    Im really torn on this.

    On the one hand, it seems totally ridiculous.

    On the other, the kids that have these allergies can die from even inhaling one little microorganism. Is it worth being indignant about having to make special meals?


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2007
    Location
    Pen Argyl PA
    Posts
    3,873

    Default

    nonsense. If your child can eat a PB sandwich on wheat bread, he should be allowed to have it.


    61 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2006
    Location
    Ontario
    Posts
    671

    Default

    That is insane. Most elementary schools I'm aware of don't provide lunches, and I know most (if not all) are peanut/nut free, but that list seems excessively restrictive. Especially considering there are no regulations in high school - they can bring whatever they want.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    Lordy, what are you supposed to pack? Rice cakes and apples?

    i get that some people are hyper-sensitive to some things, but forcing those restrictions on everyone around them is a bit much. If a child is that sensitive, then perhaps the school should be feeding him in the nurse's office with an Epi Pen in hand.

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926


    72 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,389

    Default

    TOO FAR! I can understand the nut allergy thing, IF there is a child enrolled in school who has a major nut allergy.

    Approximately 1.1% of the population has a peanut allergy, I am not sure what percentage of that 1 percent has a severe allergy. So now, thousands of children can't have peanut butter sandwiches because a small handful of children may be allergic.

    The rest of that list, ridiculous!! Seriously, how many children have such extreme gluten intolerance that they can't be in the same room as a slice of bread?!?

    Is the school ready to subsidize parents to buy all kids of specialty products so that they can adhere to the very stringent list provided?


    27 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2012
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    352

    Default

    Wow ... Just wow.

    What do they think the kids are going to eat? I realize food allergies are a big thing now, but I've never heard of someone going into anaphylactic shock from sitting next to someone drinking milk.

    Edited to add: and if your kid has a severe food intolerance to something, you should teach them not to eat it.


    23 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Posts
    1,291

    Default

    That list does seem excessive, and I would be bummed to see that as the parent of a child with no allergies whatsoever. But assuming the consequences of sending those items to school are real for even one child, it doesn't seem so impossible to make it happen. What if your child's life depended on everyone else following these guidelines?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    19,989

    Default

    What the heck can they eat? I can kind of see the peanut thing as that can be a life threatening airborne allergen but the rest of it is not airborne as far as I know.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2005
    Location
    Where it is perpetually winter
    Posts
    5,205

    Default

    ^^Then, not to sound like a hardass, perhaps a public school lunchroom isn't the safest place for your child...

    Edited to add that I'm saying this merely as devil's advocate.


    35 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,578

    Default

    How about a separate lunchroom for the hyper-allergic and another for those lucky kids who can eat the current popular "poisons"?

    Seriously, when did peanuts & wheat become toxic?
    Call me a Fogey, but I grew up on Wonder Bread and PBJ & lived to tell about it.
    Anyone besides me wonder how much GMOs are responsible for the current problems with food?
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009


    25 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Mar. 22, 2005
    Location
    Where it is perpetually winter
    Posts
    5,205

    Default

    I would blame it less on GMOs and more on the fact that we have the medical care to keep people alive who otherwise would have died in infancy or childhood due to anaphylaxis.


    33 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Oct. 26, 2007
    Location
    San Jose, Ca
    Posts
    5,389

    Default

    Further, if there are children enrolled in this school, which such extreme allergies that they can not be in the same room as cheese, or a soy product, how do they manage to survive the outside world? Are there really so many children stricken with extreme, life threatening allergies that entire schools have to ban long lists of commonly consumed products?

    How in the world did children survive 25 years ago? My school had no such bans. We did have a school teacher with a citrus allergy, and he requested that we not peel oranges in his class room - easy.

    This lists makes me think of children rolling around in hamster balls.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
    How about a separate lunchroom for the hyper-allergic and another for those lucky kids who can eat the current popular "poisons"?
    This seems like a reasonable solution to me. Yes, its not nice to "single kids out" - but really, the percentage of the population that has such extreme allergies is very small.


    24 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 10, 2003
    Posts
    76

    Default

    Just send the kids with a gigantic Pixie stick and a bottle of Mountain Dew for lunch. A couple of days of that and the teachers will be bringing in PB&J on wheat for the kids themselves.


    64 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
    Location
    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
    Posts
    9,578

    Default

    supershorty:
    Then my entire class of kindergarteners - circa 1955 - s/b dead.
    And remember that peanuts on airlines used to be standard fare.
    Nope, I blame the scientists who developed MoreFasterDamntheNutrition! plants
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
    Hey Vern! 1982-2009
    Cash's Bay Threat 1994-2009


    5 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 29, 2006
    Posts
    3,446

    Default

    In our area, a teacher sent a note out to that effect. There was such a public outcry that the school board said the teacher 'misunderstood' and that they would never expect parents to accommodate such ridiculous demands.

    It was likened to the debacle when a parent wanted the school to cut down a bunch of trees because her child was allergic to the nuts on them.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2003
    Posts
    1,291

    Default

    I will add that this request seems really odd and it's definitely a huge thing to ask of all the other parents. If I were a parent of a child who attends this school, I would request more information.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2009
    Posts
    703

    Default

    The peanut and nut thing I support. The risk of contact or aerial contamination is real. Children really do die from it... And what? Should they stay home forever? Poor kid. That wouldn't be fair.

    The rest is excessive. I've seen kids with contact allergies eat on placemats to avoid touching anything bad. Usually for the non-but allergies those may be unpleasant but not dangerous or life threatening. No nuts is standard. The rest is ridiculous.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
    Location
    Westchester County, NY
    Posts
    5,902

    Default

    That is definitely too far. I'm having a hard time figuring out what would be ok to pack. As a vegetarian (adult), I'd be hard pressed to pack myself a lunch that didn't include either dairy, eggs or soy.


    7 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
    Posts
    2,235

    Default

    Agree with everyone else. The list is excessive. I understand banning certain things when the allergy risk is real. But these are kids, and kids are picky about what they eat...how many kids are going to pack a salad or whatever for lunch? Most pack sandwiches, maybe yogurt, a cheese stick...etc, and now they're all banned!
    come what may

    Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013


    3 members found this post helpful.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 25
    Last Post: Feb. 10, 2014, 08:00 PM
  2. Replies: 11
    Last Post: Dec. 4, 2013, 02:25 PM
  3. CEM Restrictions - Any Updates?
    By Fred in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Nov. 28, 2012, 10:40 PM
  4. Healthy Food to Bring to Horse Show for Lunch
    By ParadoxFarm in forum Hunter/Jumper
    Replies: 43
    Last Post: Oct. 12, 2011, 03:57 PM
  5. New EVA Restrictions
    By Equine Reproduction in forum Sport Horse Breeding
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Oct. 9, 2010, 07:29 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •