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  1. #1
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    Mar. 15, 2007
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    Default How do you prevent static shock??

    Hi All, I have no idea where to put this post so I thought I'd put it here. I live in NC right now and I can safely say I have never experienced as much static discharge when touching my horse as I have recently. My poor overly-sensitive horse! Honestly, I can lay over my horse's back with my fingers on his neck and rump, and static discharge can occur at my fingertips even if I'm not rubbing (I'm learning that rubbing=bad). Horse is not amused. Has anyone else had this problem? What do you do to reduce shocking your horse? Thanks!
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  2. #2
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    I have heard that rubbing with Bounce sheets helps against static. It certainly helps keep dust from clinging to them in the ring. Maybe rub your clothes too?
    Proud Member of the "I Don't Do Facebook" Clique



  3. #3
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    Default

    Hmmmm, I will try that. Thanks!
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  4. #4
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    May. 5, 2002
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    Default

    Lots and lots of cans of Static Guard spray. Spray down yourself, the horse, blanket if the horse has one, use it while grooming as you brush.



  5. #5
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    Oct. 11, 2002
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    Default

    I live in the land of humidity in the teens = constant static. Two things will help: 1) Keep your fingertips wet when touching your horse or removing blankets - it grounds you. 2) At the drug or grocery store, buy some Suave Hair Conditioner labeled "Humectant". It has the same qualities as static guard, but is nicer smelling. I use it for a pre-grooming spray, pouring about an inch in a spray bottle, then filling bottle with water.
    Comprehensive Equestrian Site Planning and Facility Design
    www.lynnlongplanninganddesign.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    I figured that Bounce would work well in areas where some of us might not want to be wet right now... :P
    Proud Member of the "I Don't Do Facebook" Clique


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Feb. 7, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by BabyGoose View Post
    Lots and lots of cans of Static Guard spray. Spray down yourself, the horse, blanket if the horse has one, use it while grooming as you brush.
    I second static guard and keep it at the barn. I spray my quarter sheet (otherwise known as the blanket of death by my horse from being shocked by it b/f I wised up) every time before I use it. I've also sprayed my hands once because the static was so bad.



  8. #8
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    Mar. 24, 2004
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    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    Default

    I spray the insides of my blankets with Vetrolin Shine before I put them on. I spray & respray my brushes with V Shine while I groom.
    I prefer Vetrolin Shine to Show Sheen since I have not had the saddle slip problem with the Shine that I have had with SS in the past.
    I will sometime rub down the inside of the blanket with a Bounce sheet. I am just worried he might react badyly to dryer sheets if I use it too much. He seems prone to skin issues.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 6, 2006
    Location
    Virginia
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    Default

    Static Guard. I actually spray it on brushes and my hands as well. For some reason I am a VERY static-y person.



  10. #10
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    Aug. 30, 2013
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Default

    Static guard and bounce sheets. In a pinch, rub a metal coat hanger all over yourself (or whatever is the problem) and that discharges a lot of the static!



  11. #11
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    Thanks everyone. I know the barn owner regularly sprays the blankets with Static Guard but clearly this isn't enough! Like Ruby Tuesday, I don't look forward to getting my hands moist in this weather but I'm looking less forward to continually shocking my sensitive horse. Thanks for the suggestions, everyone!
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPony View Post
    Static Guard. I actually spray it on brushes and my hands as well. For some reason I am a VERY static-y person.
    me, too! My hair gets out of control and sticky-uppy. I don't know if it's due to my conditioner or the weather, but it's getting old.
    Proud member of the Colbert Dressage Nation



  13. #13
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    Oct. 14, 2004
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPony View Post
    Static Guard. I actually spray it on brushes and my hands as well. For some reason I am a VERY static-y person.
    How long does it last for? If I spray the inside of my mare's blanket today and take off the blanket Sunday, will it still remain static free?



  14. #14
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    Oct. 14, 2004
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    Default

    IIRC on another post, someone mentioned holding onto something metal, say the bars on the stall front, then using the other hand, take off the blanket????



  15. #15
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    Nov. 20, 2008
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    Here's my trick and it hasn't failed me yet...

    If you are taking off a blanket, fold it in thirds while it is still on the horse. Remove the blanket being careful not to touch the horse while doing so. With the back of your hand (it doesn't hurt if you use the back of your hand), touch something metal such as the stall bars. This will discharge the electricity. I haven't gotten any terrible shocks using the back of my hand. Other body parts, not so much...



  16. #16
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    Jan. 7, 2014
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    Pennsylvania
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    J-Lu, thank you for posting this question! I've felt so bad over the past few weeks because I keep shocking the bejesus out my poor horse when I take his blankies off. And of course every time I shock him, he acts like I've touched him with a cattle prod and bolts sideways drama queen.



  17. #17
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    Jul. 11, 2003
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    Iowa
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    What has worked for me when taking the blanket off is to hold onto the end of the horses tail the entire time I'm sliding the blanket off. Once the blanket is not in contact with the horse you can let go of the tail. I don't know why it works, but it does.



  18. #18
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    Mar. 1, 2003
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    I used to use Static Guard - but it doesn't hold a candle to the conditioner & water in a spray bottle. Much healthier, I think to contact hair/skin and to breathe in. Plus it gives that little bit of moisture that stops the static shock. I just lift the blanket a little and spray underneath before removing the blanket.

    There is also a hair moisturizer sold for horses (it's orange - dilute with water) which I've used. But the conditioner smells better!
    Blugal

    You never know what kind of obsessive compulsive crazy person you are until another person imitates your behaviour at a three-day. --Gry2Yng



  19. #19
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    May. 4, 2003
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    Canada
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    Don't really know the answer to that - but be warned not to disrobe your horse too near an electric fence.
    Proud member of People Who Hate to Kill Wildlife clique



  20. #20
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    May. 8, 2004
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    Default

    I always try to fold the blanket into thirds when I take it off to eliminate static. There is much less area to generate those nasty little shocks, but I also spray myself with static guard, especially when I'm wearing my big down coat. That thing acts like a semi conductor.



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