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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Oxford, PA
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    1,547

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    Bogie, your situation is more in line with what I was thinking although I have a beautiful arena with new base and footing. Calvin, I use straw and have no way of disposing ofanything else so need to use straw bedding. The most difficult aspect is finding the right fit for bo and boarder. I have homeowners insurance and instructorsxinsurance but not ccc. That right there makes it not feasable. Teaching a few more lessons sure makes sense.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
    Posts
    4,797

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    In my opinion, the liability insurance is even more important than CCC. If you charge for board, your homeowner's won't cover you.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep. 30, 2007
    Posts
    3,825

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    I do self care for my mare who lives 10 slow windy miles from my house. I work 4 10's and work is 20 miles in a different direction (so on days I work and see the kids it's a 60 mile round trip). What really really makes it work for me is that she is fed 24/7 from two bale sized slow feeders. I see her on M, W, Fr, SA, Su- I clean out her pen/stall, and top off her water. She has a stall and a turn out this works fine. Next month she and her buddy are moving to our brand new horse property and I can't wait!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep. 29, 2003
    Location
    Townsend, MA
    Posts
    2,458

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    morganpony86 - maybe I wasn't clear - we drop feed the self-care boarders provide. They supply all food and bedding and clean their stalls and do their outside watering.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    4,880

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    Quote Originally Posted by Sansena View Post
    Look, it's the same thing as moving into someone's barn and the BO insisted I use their vet, or farrier, or fed their specific grain. Yes, IF I were a noob and had a horse who was pretty straightforward and appreciated the advice or had no contacts ~~ sure. But if my horse had an issue with straw (which mine does) what makes anyone decide I should buy the product THEY insist upon with my own money, for my horse? Even if it's detrimental?

    I'm quite certain the feeling is mutual on that boarding thing, but since you felt the need to put it out there, thank you. Now I can rest easy.
    In the area that the OP is it is Mushroom farm area. The mushroom farms will frequently pick up straw based manure piles for free. I think they may even pay really big barns for their piles. They will not touch a pile that has any shavings in it. OP would have to pay to have a shavings pile removed or figure out how to compost it/spread it. Which will cost her more time, money or space.
    It is very common in her area for stalls to be exclusively straw because of the mushroom farmers requirements. Therefore it would be hard for you to find a place that allows you to use shavings, wood pellets, etc... for bedding.

    If you rent a stall at Fair Hill permanent stabling the only bedding allowed is straw. I guess you could bed in shavings but you would need to truck every last bit of them out with you. You cannot put any shavings in the manure pile at Fair Hill.
    Straw as bedding is a by-product of her location. Straw is just easier to get the manure pile gone for free.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 13, 2010
    Posts
    2,356

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    I personally don't think your attitude in regards to boarders would allow you and anyone else to coexist peacefully, especially if you are giving the boarder the "freedom" of self care/partial care board.

    You are too controlling and particular to do well as a BO, especially one doing self care.

    Not trying to be offensive, just truthful. Doesn't mean you're a bad person or horse person, just not the right person to be trying to deal with boarders on a regular basis.
    come what may

    Rest in peace great mare, 1987-2013


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2005
    Posts
    1,015

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    While I do not know you, I might agree with SAcres. I fit into that category. I could NOT handle dealing with self-boarders, especially if they were cleaning my stalls. I'm too picky.

    You're on the right path to find other ways to fund your training horse! Good luck to you!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Oxford, PA
    Posts
    1,547

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    Showbizz, I think you are right. Hit the nail on the head. I am very particular about my horses which is why I have my own farm in the first place. Yes particular about the way my horse stalls are done as well as things being put back where they belong, I aisles swept, etc cetera. I was very fortunate to find a local barn close by with an indoor to keep my competition horse. The person who runs the barn cares for horses the same way I do.. Anyone who came to my place would have to be a really good horseman and they are hard to find. :There are lots of horse people but not all of them are horsemen :-)-)



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2003
    Location
    CT
    Posts
    4,632

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    I'm just gobsmacked ANYBODY in this day and age can have their manure hauled away free of charge. Here, we pay for the dumpster rental, pay for pickup, and the business that takes it probably pays to dump the manure/ bedding.

    The kicker is that the facilities that take the manure and bedding turn around and create a product called Sweet Peat, or mulch it or similar, then sell it back to the gardening community.

    It's remarkable to me that the mushroom industry will take it all free of charge.
    Lucky you guys!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Oxford, PA
    Posts
    1,547

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    Years ago they actually used to pay me 50 to 100 dollars per load depending on how full my manure pit was. Then they paid me less and less then started wanting me to pay them. Times have changed again and now they take it free which is just fine with me :-)



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 19, 2007
    Location
    Washington, DC
    Posts
    1,880

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    OP, I think you answered your own question with nothing less than 250 (which is very high for not only self care, but self-care plus labor) being worth the loss of your privacy. I'd definitely look for another way to supplement your income.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2005
    Location
    mid-atlantic
    Posts
    2,666

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    Maude you're in a great horse-y area and I don't think you should rule out the possibility of finding a like-minded meticulous horse person. And I don't think your proposed rate is totally out of line for the area and your facilities. Put the word out among people you know. You may be surprised. Best of luck!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    Dutchess County, New York
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    4,797

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    Or, instead of trying to find someone who does things exactly like you, you could find a couple of retirees, charge more, and do the work yourself.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar. 4, 2004
    Location
    Oxford, PA
    Posts
    1,547

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    Retro, thanks. You know who I am and know where I live so maybe my expectations were on the mark.
    SMF, I am looking for less work instead of more. I have had vets in the past ask me if I would be interested in taking rehabs/layups, but that is too much work. At my age I'm looking for less. I will check into liability prices and consider retirees though my turnout is not ample and it would be a shame to waste my lovely arena. Plus at 58 I'd like to save wear and tear on my body forother things.



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