The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Results 21 to 34 of 34
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct. 7, 2010
    Posts
    1,224

    Default

    Oh, and the boots are Twisted X with a narrowish square toe (not a snip, not a wide square).
    I prefer long socks, but I also ride in breeches so I'm not sitting on a big seam, nor do I have a seam between my knee and the saddle.
    I would HAVE to use tall socks if I rode with my Wrangler riding jeans on the outside of the boots, which is what I do if I'm going to a branding or something where the breeches would attract more attention than I would like.
    I do NOT like the feel of the inside of the boot top on my bare leg. I am a delicate flower...which generally I find greatly annoying...but I do manage it.

    My boots have a rubber bottom; I walk around in too much cow manure, chuteside, in my boots to want to have a leather sole, so they're dual purpose. And the insole in the Twisted X boots is really comfortable for me.
    They also have a spur rest on the boot heel, which I really like.
    The ones from the Buck clinic photos are for dress-up, I have the same pair in a more boring color I got off eBay for $80 as my every day boots.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,137

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fillabeana View Post
    I do NOT like the feel of the inside of the boot top on my bare leg. I am a delicate flower...which generally I find greatly annoying...but I do manage it.
    I thought I'd play cowgirl the other day and rode in jeans and my boots with not-long-enough socks. OMG, the distraction of the tops of my boots touching my skin drove me bonkers!

    I have to chuckle at that last picture you posted. I remember the guy riding next to you from the Buck clinic - one of his "guys", no?

    Lovely boots, btw!
    Last edited by Pocket Pony; Jan. 9, 2014 at 11:21 AM.
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2013
    Location
    Mountain country
    Posts
    55

    Default

    Everything that cowboys wore had a purpose, and was designed with safety in mind because their job was their life! (As my trainer used to say, If a cowboy in the 1880s had had a helmet to wear, he would've worn it! Everything they used was designed with safety in mind! But that's a topic for a different thread.)

    Perhaps this is not historically accurate, but it's picked up from many many old cowmen and outfitters whose horses are their lives. Here's my impression of WHY cowboy boots are the way they are:

    Pointy vs square: Square is a new fashion look, and offers more comfort for the toes or wider feet. Pointy boots might not have been as comfortable to walk in, but no self-respecting cowboy walked! Also, pointy toes are much easier to pick up a lost stirrup with while you're running at breakneck speed.

    Short vs tall: Short boots are solely for fashion. Short boots didn't evolve until the 1960s, I believe, and that was simply to save money on leather for people wearing cowboy boots while not riding horses. The tall shaft protects your legs from brush, horns, barbed wire, rope burns, stabby branches, etc. For a lot of people, 16" tall-tops are a mark of pride, and they wouldn't be caught dead in anything shorter.

    Jeans in or jeans out: This fashion started in the 1800s with guys wearing long pants cuffed over their boots. Boots at first had quite plain stitching. Later, it evolved to wearing jeans inside their boots: cowboys' tack was a huge source of pride, and owning a beautiful pair of custom embroidered boots was reason for bragging rights, so jeans got tucked in. Personally, I do it for practicality as much as fashion: I CANNOT STAND the feeling of my jeans inside my boots, because while riding a big circle jeans always tend to creep up your calves. I hate that. I absolutely wear tight-legged jeans inside my boots for comfort sake.

    Leather sole vs crepe vs rubber: The slick leather sole had a purpose: not only did it provide better feel on leather stirrups, but it also slipped right out in an emergency. Remember, cowboys didn't walk in their boots, so there was no need to worry about the ground! I, too, find too-slick leather soles kind of dangerous on grassy slopes. Even scuffing them isn't good enough for me, so when I get them re-soled, I go with a thin, treadless rubber sole. I don't like crepe soles: they look thick and chunky, they feel thick and chunky, and they stick to stirrups. Dangerous! Plus, crepe soles seem to wear out a lot faster.

    Chinks, armitas or chaps: This seems to be a matter of personal preference. I almost always wear my chinks, unless I'm riding a green colt (then I wear my favorite suede chaps because they stick to the saddle). Chinks, armitas and chaps all evolved to protect a rider from rope burns, horns, branch stubs, etc. while working. If you're a brush popper or a cowpuncher at altitude, or an outfitter anywhere, you definitely need them. Otherwise, I think it's all about your preference/the region you live and work in!

    Someone mentioned heels and the hard leather toe, as well. Heel height should be around 2-2 1/2 inches (traditionally), and well-sloped. None of those straight heels they sell so often. Surely I have read of a purpose for this, but I can't remember it right now The toe should be rounded, hard leather, not soft at all, to protect from all kinds of nasty things that can happen to your feet. Cowboys often wore their boots one size too large, and with a solid steel shaft, to offer a great stiffness and an easy boot to slip off, in case they were hung up in their rope or stirrup.

    If you find a boot that meets all these qualifications, it will invariably have a beautiful little spur shelf on the back of the heel, where your spur will rest daintily. A custom-tooled pair of spur straps was a must. The wider ones seem to support my spurs better than the narrow ones. (While no one asked my opinion, I have to offer that Olathe boots are my personal favorite.)

    Having used cowboy boots for years as an essential part of my working gear, I have found that most of the "old" reasons that boots were made the way they were are totally valid. However, if your job doesn't involve punching cows or riding herd on a bunch of dudes, then I think you're safe letting fashion be your guide.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 10, 2010
    Posts
    103

    Default

    didn't mention tall tops for buzz worm protection. there's that old tale of a pair of boots being so loaded with fangs that several cowboys died of rattle snake poison from wearing them before it was discovered. Although I'd think someone would feel the scratch of the end of a fang and investigate. I like the traditional style for riding and dress, but they're not so good for daily work where I sometimes get in a good bit of walking around, and need the mud grip traction to keep from sliding all over the place in out wet climate.



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2014
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    47

    Default

    I know this is a little older thread...but I couldn't help myself

    Quote Originally Posted by Pocket Pony View Post
    I have one pair of cowboy boots that I wear every now and then. Since wearing them, I started noticing other people's boots and styles and now I have questions!

    1) Why a square toe vs. a pointy toe? Is the square toe a new trend because the pointy toes are too long and narrow?

    Like mentioned before, pointy toe boots have a function. Square toes are trendy not only in the show ring but with cowboys too.

    2) Why a taller boot vs. a shorter boot? I would think a taller boot would prevent against seam rubs (of jeans) better than a shorter boot.

    I have found tall vs. short shaft is somewhat regional and fashionable. I spent two years in Texas and the cowboys there, the ones who ride for a living, prefer to ride with a tall stovepipe shaft, square toe and low almost roper heel. Here in Nevada, traditional was a tall shaft, a round or pointed toe and under slung heels. Now here you will see those boots of the Paul Bond variety reserved for going to town. Riding everyday boots, you will see all kinds around here.

    3) If you ride in cowboy boots and jeans, do you tuck your jeans in or have them over the boot? Why? If you wear jeans and boots, do you also wear armitas (vs. full chaps and paddock boots)?

    I find this to be a regional thing as well. In Texas, tucking pants into boot tops was the norm. Here, you will get a strange look if you tuck your jeans into boot tops, or they will assume your from out of town
    Chap style is also regional, batwings seem to be the norm in west TX, NM and AZ. Here armitas or chinks with square legs for summer. A lot of us use shotguns during the winter. Occasionally you see woolies.


    4) Do you wear long socks so the top of the boot doesn't rub against your skin if you wear your jeans over them?

    I prefer the tall socks, sometimes my boot tops will give me a rash if I don't

    5) Why the leather sole? The soles of mine are leather and they are sooooo slippery! I can wear them to ride ok, but walking around up a hill on grassy footing is dangerous! Do you cut into leather soles with a razor to give them a bit more grip?

    Leather soles and single welt stitching to help you get out of the stirrup in case of a wreck. While leather soles aren't great for walking or standing long periods of time I always ride in leather soles. Underslung heels weren't comfortable to walk in either but were handy for oxbow stirrups. Here no one rides in oxbows anymore(a lot of Oregon guys still do) the underslung heels aren't that big of a deal. Everyone here pretty much rides in the 5" box car or bells. The Indians started the fad of riding in "hog farmer" boots, the flat crepe soled slip ons. I am too chicken to ride in them even though they are so comfortable and easy to walk in as well.
    As far as safety, someone else mentioned it, wearing a boot with a looser fit is handy in the event of getting hung up from getting bucked down- you can slide your foot out of the boot by rolling over on your belly. Another reason why I will never where a lace up boot.


    Thanks!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,195

    Default

    I've often wondered if I would have the where-with-all to roll over on my belly if I was getting drug by a horse!

    I always heard the reason the cowboys carried a pistol was to shoot the horse if they were hung up on a runaway-I don't know if I could get a good shot off in that situation either!
    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2014
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    I've often wondered if I would have the where-with-all to roll over on my belly if I was getting drug by a horse!

    I always heard the reason the cowboys carried a pistol was to shoot the horse if they were hung up on a runaway-I don't know if I could get a good shot off in that situation either!
    I have never heard that about carrying a pistol, makes sense though!

    I never thought I would ever have to use or even remember to roll over in the event of a hang up. But believe it or not, I did, on a colt that bucked me down-thank goodness I got free and my boot was still hung in the stirrup when someone caught my colt a few hundred yards away...whew!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,137

    Default

    What are hog farmer boots?

    What are stovepipe boots?

    Are there boots taller than what the average boot seems to be? Like english tall boots? I find the a-little-higher-than-mid-calf height distracting, but if I could find higher ones then maybe I'd like that?

    Aces N Eights, if you don't wear a lace-up boot, what do you wear with shotgun chaps?
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2012
    Posts
    390

    Default

    1) Why a square toe vs. a pointy toe? Is the square toe a new trend because the pointy toes are too long and narrow?
    My current boots have a round toe, and that was just kind of the style/what I liked back when I bought them. My next pair will most likely be square toed.

    2) Why a taller boot vs. a shorter boot? I would think a taller boot would prevent against seam rubs (of jeans) better than a shorter boot.
    Mine are shorter. Again had to do with what I liked at the time of purchasing them. I don't like boots that are *too* tall. Short to medium are fine.

    3) If you ride in cowboy boots and jeans, do you tuck your jeans in or have them over the boot? Why? If you wear jeans and boots, do you also wear armitas (vs. full chaps and paddock boots)?
    Sometimes I have my jeans half-tucked in (insides tucked, outside not), sometimes they are completely tucked in (skinnier jeans) or over the boot. I prefer them over the boot. And I don't ride in chaps, but that's because I don't have any full chaps, and I can't get my half-chaps on over my western boots very well.

    4) Do you wear long socks so the top of the boot doesn't rub against your skin if you wear your jeans over them?
    I can easily wear ankle-length socks in my boots and won't have rubs; but I have more pairs of ankle-length socks than I do shin/knee length, so that could be it too! lol

    5) Why the leather sole? The soles of mine are leather and they are sooooo slippery! I can wear them to ride ok, but walking around up a hill on grassy footing is dangerous! Do you cut into leather soles with a razor to give them a bit more grip?
    I'm honestly not even sure what my soles are made of. o.O Possibly not leather? That would be my guess.



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,195

    Default

    I think the hog farmer boots are what most would call a roper... low heeled, slick bottom.

    Though to me a fat baby with tread is a hog farmer boot-has no place in a stirrup, better out feeding the hogs!

    I *think* a stove pipe top is just a bigger wider upper that stands out from the leg but I'm just making a flagrant guess there. Some buckaroo type boots are calf high with the finger holes built in but some are just like a piece of stove pipe on the leg... that's just what I'm picking up out of my memory so it's subject to correction.

    ETA-I may have guessed correctly-found a few boots that look like this: http://www.genioboots.com/Stove-Pipe...N-Tassels.html

    I love this history-western culture and tradition is really cool!

    Aces and Eights-excellent handle, btw!
    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2013
    Location
    AZ
    Posts
    437

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by HeadWrangler View Post
    Everything that cowboys wore had a purpose, and was designed with safety in mind because their job was their life! (As my trainer used to say, If a cowboy in the 1880s had had a helmet to wear, he would've worn it! Everything they used was designed with safety in mind! But that's a topic for a different thread.)

    Perhaps this is not historically accurate, but it's picked up from many many old cowmen and outfitters whose horses are their lives. Here's my impression of WHY cowboy boots are the way they are:

    Pointy vs square: Square is a new fashion look, and offers more comfort for the toes or wider feet. Pointy boots might not have been as comfortable to walk in, but no self-respecting cowboy walked! Also, pointy toes are much easier to pick up a lost stirrup with while you're running at breakneck speed.
    True, but the super-pointy needle-nose were never used on the old range. That was just a fashion thing thing that came in in the '60's. There was a pointing of the toe back in the day, for the reasons you cited, but not to the extreme that we usually see now.

    Quote Originally Posted by HeadWrangler View Post
    (...)

    Someone mentioned heels and the hard leather toe, as well. Heel height should be around 2-2 1/2 inches (traditionally), and well-sloped. None of those straight heels they sell so often. Surely I have read of a purpose for this, but I can't remember it right now The toe should be rounded, hard leather, not soft at all, to protect from all kinds of nasty things that can happen to your feet. Cowboys often wore their boots one size too large, and with a solid steel shaft, to offer a great stiffness and an easy boot to slip off, in case they were hung up in their rope or stirrup.
    I think that was me.. And I remember the why of the underslung heel now. You're right about the heels being 2" to 2.5", and (if I remember right) the old guys told us that at that high heel, if straight down at the back, on a quick dismount, when you needed to stop hard, it would not hit the ground at the right angle, and tend to flip the person forward when you are dismounting quickly to do rope work on a calf or the like. The underslung heel would not flip you forward when it grabbed the ground, but would rather start digging in and provide traction while keeping your leg and foot at a better angle for leverage and stability.

    Notice that "Roper" boots sold today have a straight heel, but it is quite low.

    Quote Originally Posted by HeadWrangler View Post
    If you find a boot that meets all these qualifications, it will invariably have a beautiful little spur shelf on the back of the heel, where your spur will rest daintily. A custom-tooled pair of spur straps was a must. The wider ones seem to support my spurs better than the narrow ones. (While no one asked my opinion, I have to offer that Olathe boots are my personal favorite.)

    Having used cowboy boots for years as an essential part of my working gear, I have found that most of the "old" reasons that boots were made the way they were are totally valid. However, if your job doesn't involve punching cows or riding herd on a bunch of dudes, then I think you're safe letting fashion be your guide.
    But you gotta' admit - some of those old boots with the double-eagle inlays were true works of art!
    Founding Member: Spotted Saddlebred Pals Clique

    When my grandmother's perfume bottle broke, my young second cousin said: "Nana! You smell like a French HORSE!"



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Feb. 27, 2014
    Location
    Nevada
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Pocket Pony View Post
    What are hog farmer boots?

    What are stovepipe boots?

    Are there boots taller than what the average boot seems to be? Like english tall boots? I find the a-little-higher-than-mid-calf height distracting, but if I could find higher ones then maybe I'd like that?

    Aces N Eights, if you don't wear a lace-up boot, what do you wear with shotgun chaps?
    Hopefully these links to images will work...
    http://drewsboots.com/sites/default/...ull/DRH617.jpg


    Stovepipes, pretty much look like they sound, tall straight shaft. I have a pair similar to the ones pictured and they hit right below the knee. Probably as close as you get to an English tall boot as far as height but not in the close fit around the calf.
    Mine are made by Anderson Bean try looking at their website. I am having some custom made by a guy in AZ, if your interested I can PM you his info.

    These Justin wedge sole boots are what we call "Hog Farmer boots", you can see why I wouldn't want to ride in them.
    http://img.rakuten.com/PIC/17769408/...0/17769408.jpg

    Shotgun chaps aren't so tight that I can't wear any of my boots with them.



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2005
    Location
    Sandy, Utah
    Posts
    6,228

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Aces N Eights View Post
    Shotgun chaps aren't so tight that I can't wear any of my boots with them.
    True, being cheap I am still wearing the same pair of shotguns acquired in the late 60s, chic buckstitching and all. Though I've always only zipped them down just to the knee for ease of mount/dismount and such- zip 'em all the way down when the situation warrants.



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2014
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    50

    Default

    1) Why a square toe vs. a pointy toe? Is the square toe a new trend because the pointy toes are too long and narrow?
    Personal preference, mostly. I have two pairs of square toe boots because I like how they look. I personally don't like pointy toe boots on my own feet. My biggest thing is = comfort. The boots have to be comfortable.

    2) Why a taller boot vs. a shorter boot? I would think a taller boot would prevent against seam rubs (of jeans) better than a shorter boot.
    I prefer a taller boot. As someone already mentioned, a taller boot will not "catch" under the fender. But again, it's a matter of personal preference.

    3) If you ride in cowboy boots and jeans, do you tuck your jeans in or have them over the boot? Why? If you wear jeans and boots, do you also wear armitas (vs. full chaps and paddock boots)?
    Usually, my jeans are on the outside of my boots. The jeans help prevent the top of the boot from catching the fender. Sometimes if I feel like it, or I'm riding in jeans that are too short for riding, I'll "messy" tuck them into my boots.

    4) Do you wear long socks so the top of the boot doesn't rub against your skin if you wear your jeans over them?
    Yes. I do not wear short socks because leather rubbing is not comfortable for me.

    5) Why the leather sole? The soles of mine are leather and they are sooooo slippery! I can wear them to ride ok, but walking around up a hill on grassy footing is dangerous! Do you cut into leather soles with a razor to give them a bit more grip?
    You WANT the soles of your boots to be slippery. That is what gives you a safety factor in a western saddle. If you fall off, you want your foot to slide out of the stirrup so you aren't dragged behind the horse. Just be careful walking up the grassy hill.

    Oh, and I need to know about spurs, too. I have spurs that I wear with my English paddock boots, but tell me about Western spurs....How do the straps work? Are there spurs that don't need straps?
    Yes, there are slip-on western spurs but I don't recommend them. They can slip OFF as easy as the slip on.

    Do all spurs work the same? I mean, when I've looked at them online there are some that seem to be angled where the straps go (sorry I don't know terminology), some that are really wide where they go around the heel, some that are narrower, etc. Do some actually go around the heel of the boot vs the heel of your foot? Are there different types of straps that one might need to know about so they don't buy the wrong spur/strap combination?
    A short rider on a tall horse will need a shorter spur. A tall rider on a short horse will need a longer spur. So the leg length of the rider and the height of the horse play a factor. Spurs should only be used if you have excellent control of your lower leg. Spurs are meant to refine cues; not force a horse to listen or go faster. They are an advanced tool.



Similar Threads

  1. Let's see your cowboy boots !
    By sonomacounty in forum Western
    Replies: 25
    Last Post: Jan. 3, 2014, 10:16 AM
  2. Cowboy boots?
    By SecondInCommand in forum Off Course
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: Jul. 12, 2011, 03:02 PM
  3. Cowboy boots!
    By grandprix in forum Off Course
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: Mar. 9, 2010, 07:54 PM
  4. Miscellaneous "Hows?" and "Whys?"
    By greysandbays in forum Off Topic
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: Dec. 25, 2009, 08:07 PM
  5. Got Western ? Spinoff, Cowboy Dressage
    By AZ Native in forum Dressage
    Replies: 125
    Last Post: Nov. 2, 2009, 09:07 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
randomness