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  1. #21
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    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    Same here! I took three years of Latin, passed them all by abyssal grades (We had to read the Odyssey!!) and I couldn't speak a sentence now. I remember what most words MEAN, but forming sentences just doesn't happen without senseless butchery. .
    The Odyssey is in Greek, not Latin. I think you may mean The Aeneid.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  2. #22
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    2,612

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    I have a degree in the Classics (Latin and Greek) and have taught Latin. There are several good books out there that are plain enough that you could go through them on your own. In addition, some of the older (think 50's or earlier) high school text books are very plainly and easily written, so that they pretty much teach themselves. (Some of the newer textbooks out there are harder to follow without a teacher). Feel free to PM me and I can give you specific suggestions.



  3. #23
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    Apr. 13, 2008
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    NY
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    3,813

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    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    The Odyssey is in Greek, not Latin. I think you may mean The Aeneid.
    Oops! It's been a while.. Thank you.

    On that note, maybe it'd be fun to read Xenophon's work? I specifically remember one such book in my Latin teacher's repetoire, "The Art of Horsemanship" by Xenophon.. Never read it though the cover was intriguing enough. I hear enough of his translated work to understand he's probably a fun read.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  4. #24
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    9,365

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    I have no idea how to learn Latin unless you find someone who can speak it. I was lucky that the public schools here in Savannah used to teach us Latin, yes we even spoke it in class and memorized it. My father spoke Latin and so he encouraged me to learn and to speak the "dead" language. Latin is the basis for all of the romance languages, so when I took french in high school and then french and german in college, I could understand and interpret the languages because I had a basis in latin. And while I had not planned to go to law school (wanted to be a vet, but didn't want to experiment with animals so then I wanted to work for state dept overseas, passed test but didn't have political influence) I did go to law school and the latin I learned in "junior high" and high school really helped me. Of course so did the french and german since some of the cases had those references in them, and being only one of 2 women in my class, I knew what a "lapin" coat was in case law. I still can recite Julius Caesar's commentaries in latin. And it's been many decades.
    So find someone who speaks the language. I don't know how the rosetta stone language series is. I should learn spanish as my father said many decades ago that it would one day be the universal language.



  5. #25
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    Jun. 9, 2012
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    Learning Latin is fun, and as several posters have said, you will understand English (and the Romance languages) as you never have before. Reading Latin literature (of all periods) is very rewarding, but the rewards take some time to come. My first recommendation would be to check with your nearest university. You can either take a class or find a student--either a graduate student or advanced undergraduate--to tutor you. I recommend taking a class, if it fits into your schedule, because the presence of other students boosts morale. Lots of non-traditional students take Latin. Beware however: it can be addicting and lead to the desire to learn Greek.



  6. #26
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    Aug. 7, 2004
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    I am possibly the biggest Latin nerd there is (five years, got my first research job in musicology because I knew Latin (sort of. ha!)).

    There is a great app in itunes that's called SPQR--it will take up a chunk of space on your iphone, but it's brilliant as a reference source. All verbs conjugated, great dictionary, literal word-for-word translations of a lot of prose and poetry. You can also quiz yourself and look up various grammar rules.

    As for learning Latin, I would highly recommend getting a used, beat-up copy of Ecce Romani. I've now been exposed to three different Latin textbooks/pedagogy, and while Ecce can be cheesy at times, and you'll giggle everytime you come across the name "Sextus," it is very friendly and easy to follow along with. I also think they have the friendliest explanations in regards to grammar. And lots of charts!

    Learning Latin is a ton of memorization. That is the toughest part since before you can read any prose let alone poetry, you have to have an excellent grasp of most of the vocab, particularly verbs. And because it's mostly memorization, you may find it easier to be in a classroom setting at a local uni. Teachers have amazing tricks and tips for getting all the noun declensions down-pact. The other part of Latin that's tricky and sometimes best-taught by a teacher is the grammar. If you have a strong grasp of English grammar, you'll be great. If you don't, then by taking Latin you will be an English grammar fiend. I'm just sad you missed out on Latin camp via highschool Latin--talk about memorable field trips, mercy.

    Go Latin! Eugapae!



  7. #27
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    Oct. 2, 2012
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    Repeated viewings of Life of Brian?
    A helmet saved my life.

    2015 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #28
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    Dec. 26, 2008
    Location
    Indianapolis, Indiana
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    624

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    Don't. It's pretty useless, in my opinion. Just get a dictionary of common foreign sayings and you'll be better off.
    Yes, I ride a pony. No, he's not a re-sale project...
    http://fancyponypants.blogspot.com



  9. #29
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    Sep. 25, 2010
    Location
    Ottawa, Canada
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    273

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    I studied Latin all through high school, and yes, it gives you solid foundation in languages, terms, and grammar.

    Forget church. Most of what is heard is rote. Try and find yourself a course or tutor. Given that learning Latin means analysing sentence structure, you can probably find an online course.

    Also, start reading Roman history, authors and poets in English which will give you context for the language. Once you are proficient enough, you start reading Latin authors which will be easier when you understand the stories in English.



  10. #30
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    Aug. 26, 1999
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    Concord, California, USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by emilia View Post
    The other way around- hard C (K) is classical.

    I must say, I like the softer pronunciation better, but I grew up with it.

    You made me laugh with your Latin mass. Some things are the same across the globe.
    Ah right. I was remembering the hard C from Cicero and Caesar's Commentaries.
    We had to sing a round song in class:

    Plato, Cicero
    Divus Aristotole
    Cecederunt in profundo.


    or "Jingle Bells" in Latin:

    Tinnitus, Tinnitus, semper tinnitus
    O tantum est gaudium dum vehimur in traha!

    (Spelling may be a little off, but that's what I remember)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Jan. 3, 2009
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    On the buckle
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    My son is about to graduate from college with a double major in Math and Classics. He's planning a couple of years teaching Latin in private high schools as a change of pace before grad school. I think he would recommend Ecce Romani as well. If anyone has any leads for jobs for him in the fall, sing out!
    Mon Ogon (Mo) and Those Wer the Days (Derby)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    Feb. 5, 2002
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    I took two years of Latin and five years of Spanish in high school and loved both. I learned vocabulary with flash cards, walking in the woods with my dog. Years later I still see certain trees and think about noun declensions... Honestly, Latin was the best thing I ever did for learning English and Spanish grammar and vocabulary. It also didn't hurt that the teacher was one of the best I ever had in high school!



  13. #33
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    Jun. 9, 2012
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    162

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    Does he know about the American Classical League website? They run a job list.

    Quote Originally Posted by mojo7777 View Post
    My son is about to graduate from college with a double major in Math and Classics. He's planning a couple of years teaching Latin in private high schools as a change of pace before grad school. I think he would recommend Ecce Romani as well. If anyone has any leads for jobs for him in the fall, sing out!



  14. #34
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by betsyk View Post
    I took two years of Latin and five years of Spanish in high school and loved both. I learned vocabulary with flash cards, walking in the woods with my dog. Years later I still see certain trees and think about noun declensions... Honestly, Latin was the best thing I ever did for learning English and Spanish grammar and vocabulary. It also didn't hurt that the teacher was one of the best I ever had in high school!
    Our latin teacher was terrible, everyone hated her.
    Every Monday afternoon we went to class for two hours.
    Latin really is a good foundation for most other western languages.
    All of us had several years of it in our high schools, mandatory.

    As an adult, I don't know if having time, it may not make more sense to learn a "live" language directly, maybe one like spanish, that so many in the world speak it.
    Spanish has a very extensive vocabulary that can form the basis of many of those latin words used in other, law, medicine and other sciences.

    You could start with latin and see where you go from that, maybe then move onto other romanic languages.



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