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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2011
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    1,668

    Default Hott Wash Portable Water Heater

    Ok, my barn does not have hot water and I can't go thru another winter without some sort of way to wash legs and horsey bits.

    I am looking at buying a Hott Wash brand portable heater, the 8 gallon size. Has anyone used one? I read a review that was not so great, says the thing needs to be put together when you get it and it needs to be "hard wired" .. Have no idea what that means. Add says its electric, and plugs into 110v outlet.

    Also, How was the capacity?


    Thanks!!!!



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2009
    Posts
    758

    Default

    I've got 2 (small and larger one) and I like them.

    I believe the hardwire part is if you intend to mount it semi-permanently in the barn. If you use it in the portable mode (with the carrier/wheels), you just plug it in to 110 and to the hose.

    You can adjust the temperature so there are a number of ways to use it. The unit heats the water in the tank pretty quickly. I turn the temperature up very high and then mix buckets of really hot and cold water to make warm water to bathe.

    I still don't really bathe my horses in the winter because of the cold but it's great for small areas, legs, or sheath cleaning. Also great for cleaning other items with warm water.

    The only problem I had was a little leaking around the attachment points but it wasn't difficult to fix.

    There might be better things on the market now, but nothing really comes to mind you can compare it to. I've been happy with mine.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 24, 2007
    Posts
    966

    Default

    I had one, it was a lifesaver when I was at a barn with no hot water. It was not hard to assemble, it was hard to get the water just the temp I wanted it so I did what the other poster said and let it get too hot, mixed it with colder water and sprayed him off once it started to cool down. You certainly can rinse off a couple horses or fully bath one.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2007
    Posts
    15,399

    Default

    Trainer friend has one she uses portable-style. It's a heavy, PITA to move around strapped precariously on a dolly. You then attach it's hose to a spigot and use another short hose coming off the machine. If you can get a horse bath amount of water from this at the temp you want, I don't know how that's done.

    When I fed, I didn't drag it out but used my trusty old coiled-wire bucket heater. Same job in the same time, maybe less electricity. Definitely less work.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2003
    Location
    Aiken SC
    Posts
    556

    Default

    I have one of the small square white plastic ones, don't remember the brand but I don't think it's this one that uses a portable gas tank set up with a dolly if I have got the correct one you are asking about. This one does not have a temp setting and it heats the water to the right temp for bathing, but it is to small. I would say it' s 3 gal or so and I get about half way through the bath or so and am out of hot water. It might have enough for just a rinse off, so I end up washing until I am out of hot water, then letting it sit while I scrub white legs or something for it to recover and then finishing.

    The last place, I had a 10 gal hot water tank that I had converted so it will hook up with a hose and plug into the wall. It was great, 10 gal was enough to do what I needed.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,840

    Default

    I've had the 4 gal unit for several years. I find it works great for hosing off a horse ... just hosing down, not a full-scale bath. I also find mine takes at least 25 mins to get to the temp I want, though this may be a sign of its age.

    When I need a small amount of warm / hot water, I use a bucket heater. When I need to do a full-scale bath, I plan out the water similar to what the other posters have said - a combination of buckets and the Hott Wash.

    Even with these issues, I feel it has served well in my situation and I would replace it with another one, should it fail.

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    4,041

    Default

    I have this, just got it two months ago, and I am tickled with it
    http://www.sstack.com/Stable_Bathing...ashing-System/

    I don't have electricity, if I did I would rather have a really good bucket heater if I was just interested in making mashes or cleaning legs or bits, etc. things where just a big bucket of steamy water would suffice.

    The propane water heater is a bit of a hassle, you have to lug it out, plug in the hoses, the flame unit can be tempermental, and then it has to be disconnected and drained when put away. I store it far away from the barn where the horses are as even properly put away a propane tank is still a fire hazard (touch wood).

    It DID come in very handy for washing my horse though. It is endless on demand hot water. The water pressure isn't great, but decent enough to bathe a horse if you have patience and don't mind going slowly. My horse LOVED the hot water. He's usually one to dance and fuss a little bit, sink his back when the water finally makes it there, but he stood stock still and was groaning with delight with the hot water. It made sheath cleaning a surprisingly much easier task too. And rinsed mane and tail free of shampoo very well.

    I'm also pleasantly surprised how long a propane tank is lasting. I bought mine two months ago. Gave my horses both two full body washes, use it every single day for hot mashes, once a week for doing washing up of rags and cloths, and washed every single one of my blankets with it.... and I still have half a tank of propane left. I go through more propane with the BBQ than with the heater.

    I'm curious to see how the thing performs in sub freezing weather though, hope its up to the task.
    Worry is the biggest enemy of the present. It steals your joy and keeps you very busy doing absolutely nothing at all... it’s like using your imagination to create things you don’t want.



  8. #8

    Default

    I have almost the exact same system as buck22, though mine is "homemade." I think I like my dolly better (it's heavy-duty) and their wash hose better ... so for the money ($159) I'd have bought theirs if I'd known about it.

    The water heater works great, I have had no problems with it whatsoever and I really just love it. I also have a bucket heater, but seldom use it. Takes too long. This heats your water up INSTANTLY, so you are ready to go immediately. And you're not limited to 4 gallons or 8 gallons.

    Like buck22, I have found the propane tank lasts a LONG time. I also find that draining it and bringing into the heated garage is a bit of a PITA -- but since mine is on a heavy-duty dolly, it's not not too bad.

    Overall, for a portable hot water solution, I think the insta-hot is a better idea than the hott wash. Doesn't require electricity, so it can go anywhere you can get a hose. Also, will give you hot water if the power goes out.

    Added: I see now that their "cart" is sold separately. I think I saved $ with my homemade system. I bought the water heater from Camping World, it was on sale at the time http://www.campingworld.com/shopping...r-heater/37786. I got a nice, heavy-duty dolly from Home Depot ... so with the sale price that I got, I think it was worth the $$ savings.
    Last edited by King's Ransom; Dec. 3, 2011 at 03:11 PM. Reason: read the ad more closely



  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2009
    Location
    Location: Indiana, but my heart is in Zone II
    Posts
    2,790

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Noms View Post
    Ok, my barn does not have hot water and I can't go thru another winter without some sort of way to wash legs and horsey bits.

    I am looking at buying a Hott Wash brand portable heater, the 8 gallon size. Has anyone used one? I read a review that was not so great, says the thing needs to be put together when you get it and it needs to be "hard wired" .. Have no idea what that means. Add says its electric, and plugs into 110v outlet.

    Also, How was the capacity?


    Thanks!!!!
    I have it. I love it. Mine is not hard wired in. I plug it in and use it when needed.

    It can be hard wired or you can use the plug. The manual tells you that if you need to use an extenstion cord if it is wall mounted, it should be hard wired by a certified electrician. Prob has something to do w/ the grounding.

    I use mine as a plug in, not wall mounted and adore it.
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov. 9, 2010
    Location
    Northern VA
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Item #42241 EccoTemp High Capacity Portable Tankless Water Heater $214.99
    from CampingWorld.com. Propane. Just bought it this fall because I wanted hot, or at least warm, water to rinse legs etc...during the winter. So far, so good.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2011
    Posts
    376

    Default

    Good thread. I was wondering about the portable propane water heaters. We installed a small electric water heater in our barn and rarely use it. We had too much trouble in the winter with pipes freezing so we shut the tackroom water off--no more tackroom washer and dryer in the winter, either. Sigh.....

    I bought a $20 electric kettle at Costco and I love that for making hot mash, warming up the soaked beet pulp, and making hot water for soaking hooves. I even used it to heat water to get iceballs out of hooves. It would be ideal to make warm wash water for small jobs like bit washing or spot cleaning on a horse. If you have electricity at your barn it's a great tool. If you bought an inverter, you might be able to use it with your car or truck--some of them have an outlet built in now. You would need to see if the wattage for heating water was too high.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 4, 2011
    Posts
    1,668

    Default

    Here is what I ended up buying, same one as gerut. I like the capacity and the flow rate. I hemmed and hawed between this one and the Hott Wash brand, but I think the propane will be easier to deal with and more portable.

    http://www.amazon.com/Eccotemp-L10-C...ref=pd_cp_hi_1


    Thanks Y'all.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    Noms and gerut: I have an outdoor washrack...and I have run a regular hose from the hydrant to the washrack. Does this unit operate on/with a regular (not pipe) hose connection? And, will it operate with a regular 'barbeque' sized propane tank? I'm much more interested in this vs. the 'smaller' one, but I'd really like to understand? the differences in operation/use/set up.

    thanks!!!!!
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 6, 2000
    Location
    SE Mass
    Posts
    4,213

    Default

    What do you do with it in freezing temps? Can you leave it in an uninsulated barn or will parts of it wit water in them freeze and break?



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2009
    Posts
    412

    Default

    I have the same Eccotemp unit, and it is fantastic. It does utilize the same size propane tank as in a BBQ grill, and so far (2 months) mine is still running on the same one, and it's still about half full. That's been using it almost daily to wash dogs, a couple of horses, and to soak alfalfa cubes.

    You can leave it outside, as long as you detach all hoses and remove the drain plug/pin and drain it well, but I did that last week, and the small drain was plugged with an ice cap. So, instead of taking a chance on it actually freezing any water left inside, I unhook it and put it inside. It's not that heavy (about 30 lbs?? max) so I've just put short hoses on it, hang it on a nail in the wall in the tack room, and put a muck bucket under it with the hoses and drain open.

    It does operate with a regular hose connection, but the unit is a 1/2" threaded connector to a 3/4" hose connection--it comes with one connector, but I had to go to Lowe's and get another one as it wouldn't seal properly. I also had to get a 3/4" hose adapter to be able to put a sprayer on the end, as the hose is used in a reversed configuration. (The male end of the hose is used at the tank)

    Well worth the money, and the flow rate is excellent. You do have to watch the temp, as it can get to scalding pretty fast if you use it continuously.



  16. #16

    Default

    Just want to add that I have the smaller one, which I only paid about $99 for, and it works great. Plenty of hot water for a bath, to clean a wound, soak cubes, etc.

    I am keeping mine in the heated garage, it's on a dolly and very portable. But yes, you can drain it as TimelyImpulse described and it should be fine.

    I put a quick-connect on mine because I have arthritis and it's tough for me to screw hoses on and off. The quick-connect is not helpful in winter, though, as you need to let everything drain. When the temps are above freezing, I also use a splitter on my hydrant -- one valve goes to the hot water heater and the other is "open" for cold water. This effectively gives me hot and cold running water about 9 months of the year around here.

    I don't really know why you'd need the bigger unit? It's not like it has greater capacity, since this is not a holding-tank type setup. You get instantly hot water as fast as your hydrant can deliver it. Unless I'm missing something, I can't see spending $100+ more for the bigger unit?



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    Timely Impulse: thanks so much for the detailed info in re: connections/usage. That sealed it for me, and I just sent the link to my DH as my Christmas wish!!!
    KR...hmmm..honestly? I hadn't thought of the 'ok, what is the benefit of the more expensive one'...I simply thought it must be more powerful, and maybe would be more efficient with the pressure? but, that too is a good question for those who have the more expensive one: Can you let us know what your understanding of the differences between the lower priced one and the higher?
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    I have a hydrant in the little barn aisle with a brass splitter on it so I have : one hose connected that runs up/over door frame and into outdoor washrack from top of exterior wall (that makes up the outside wall of the wash rack)....this way, that hose has 'self draining' when disconnected....the other 'Y' of the splitter thingy I have a short coil hose on, just for the two interior buckets, and the water in the run in (connected)

    My plan is: to have another brass splitter Y when I install / hook up the unit. One hose will go into the unit from there, and one will be my 'cold water' usage in the washrack.

    and ultimate plan is: the hose that will go from hydrant/above door frame/into washrack will be an electric warming hose that I can plug in for winter months (again: hydrant is inside barn and right beside a GFI protected plug just for this use)....this would keep water flowing, when needed, and I'd simply unplug it for summer.

    thats my plan! )
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Aug. 19, 2009
    Posts
    412

    Default

    The L5 has a 1.3 gpm and the L10 has a 2.5 gpm capacity. I wanted to make sure I had enough water flow to rinse things quickly. When I was in Malaysia we had a lower flow hot water heater and it was awful. It took forever to rinse hair.

    We also have a huge shed we are planning on converting to a cottage and plan on using the heater there eventually. I paid $198 with free shippingn from Amazon.com



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,274

    Default

    timelyimp: thanks so much!!! kinda what I thought, and as I really wanted an electric/hard wired on demand water heater, I did want something more powerful for the flow if it was available. So, I'm sold, and hope Santa is listening!
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett



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