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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 29, 2000
    Location
    Southern Pines, N.C.
    Posts
    11,480

    Default Turning 65 this year. How to change from current insurance to Medicare?

    I know this is a topic that most of you will have no interest in, but there must be some other OBGs out there. I need to decide whether or not to change to ACA. Right now I have a grandfathered in policy with BC/BS (which I will lose if I cancel it) --- But the monthly payments are 4x of the ACA. Will I be canceling my current insurance (whatever it is) when I go on Medicare?
    Last edited by Lord Helpus; Dec. 23, 2013 at 02:14 PM.
    "I used to have money, now I have horses."



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,667

    Default

    No, on Medicare you get to buy a supplemental insurance from your current or any other company, that covers what Medicare won't.

    I was with our state Cattlemen's Association's, TSCRA, thru BC/BS, insurance for decades.
    Once on Medicare, they changed the policy to reflect that, now it is called something like BC/BS Advantage Plus, I think.

    You will find that you don't save that much, but if that is a problem, there are cheaper insurances out there.
    Cheaper means that you will pay less premiums, but more on the other end, if you get sick and your deductible is high, or your coverage % skimpy.

    The reason many here stick with BC/BS is that is the one most doctors here honor.
    For other insurances, you have to ask around to be sure they will take you.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,682

    Default

    The first thing you do is call SS and set up an appointment at your local office.

    Take your ID with you. They will call up your record, tell you what your status is, and then tell you what you need to do. They will also give you an estimate of your benefits.

    When I retired SS was not doing appointments by computer. Maybe they are now. In any event the SS Service Center is your first stop.

    Welcome to the Golden Years!!!

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2013
    Posts
    378

    Default

    What, imo, you need to do before the "deadline" is to enroll in Medicare, parts A and B, AND a supplemental policy + rx coverage. After you are accepted by Medicare, cancel BC/BS, or, if you like them, make either BC or BS your supplemental. (I don't like them.)

    If you are drawing, or are eligible to draw, Social Security payments, Medicare, part B, will be deducted from your monthly check. There is NO charge for part A coverage unless you're filthy rich--and maybe not even then (never having had that problem, I don't know for sure).

    The reason I'm as conversant with this stuff as I am--and there's plenty I don't know about it--is because I have recently wrestled with it on behalf of my mother and my husband.

    Your choice of supplemental plans will depend upon your geographic location in the US. If I were shopping for a supplemental, I'd probably choose United through AARP. My mother, who had this brand of insurance, paid $185 per month for it, and there was never any quibble about a medical office's acceptance of it and no co-pay.

    Good luck with navigating this. It's a total PITA.

    PS: If you're registering with Medicare, you don't have to fiddle with the ACA, unless they're regulating the supplemental. At least my family did not.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr. 12, 2002
    Location
    Texas
    Posts
    3,534

    Default

    You can also dial 211 and speak to a benefits counselor who will tell you your options and get you all set up. My mother works for the Area Agency on Aging and this is something they do.
    Rhode Islands are red;
    North Hollands are blue.
    Sorry my thoroughbreds
    Stomped on your roo. Originally Posted by pAin't_Misbehavin' :



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 29, 2004
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    1,504

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    Take your ID with you. They will call up your record, tell you what your status is, and then tell you what you need to do. They will also give you an estimate of your benefits..
    Don't know what health-related info you get online from SS but you can go to http://www.socialsecurity.gov and check estimated benefits online, no waiting



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,667

    Default

    Read up on what all you need to have on hand, birth certificate, social security card and such other, before you go sign up.

    The Social Security web site will guide thru all you need to know about applying for Medicare.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,379

    Default

    Before you consider dropping your current BC/BS policy in favor of ACA you might want to check with your current BC/BS office to see what they will have available in Medicare supplemental insurance. Right now, this yr and last yr (when I switched to BC/BS), I pay $0, yes zero, monthly premium to BC/BS. Depending on when you actually turn 65 it may be cheaper in the long run to stay with your BC/BS. Medicare comes out of my social security at $104.90.

    My payment to my PCP is $40 and any specialist did go up to $45 I think. I'd have to go look at my card but I think that's right.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    8,412

    Default

    I second the trip to the SS office. Find out when you can officially be covered by Medicare. Then shop around for Medigap insurance, and that's through many organizations, and insurance companies. Everyone from AARP, to private insurance, and many groups offer Medigap insurance.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
    Posts
    8,682

    Default

    The OP may be a "notch baby" and not eligible for SS retirement (or some other benefits) until some months after they turn 65. This, again, is a question for the SS Administration.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2005
    Location
    SF Bay Area
    Posts
    2,668

    Default

    The "notch" babies were those born between 1917 and 1921.
    The Notch Issue


    The retirement age at which somebody can receive full benefits has been going up for years. All SS eligible workers can still retire at 62 or later and receive reduced benefits and Medicare starts at 65 regardless of age for full benefits. Incidentally, many Medi-gap policies require the holder also enroll in Medicare B. The supplemental, gap policy then responds to what is not covered by Medicare.

    1937 or earlier 65
    1938 65 and 2 months
    1939 65 and 4 months
    1940 65 and 6 months
    1941 65 and 8 months
    1942 65 and 10 months
    1943--1954 66
    1955 66 and 2 months
    1956 66 and 4 months
    1957 66 and 6 months
    1958 66 and 8 months
    1959 66 and 10 months
    1960 and later 67
    Full retirement age



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