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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,401

    Default

    The flower pot/candle thing cowboymom posted does put out quite a bit of heat. Quite surprising.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    8,796

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    Quote Originally Posted by vineyridge View Post
    My dream is having Aladdin lamps for the three rooms that I use.
    Spendy but beautiful https://www.lehmans.com/p-2818-aladd...pal-shade.aspx
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 24, 2005
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    7,411

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    I like the battery operated lanterns (preferably plastic chimneys, not glass), because they give a lot of light, and are very safe.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    8,796

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    Quote Originally Posted by JanM View Post
    I like the battery operated lanterns (preferably plastic chimneys, not glass), because they give a lot of light, and are very safe.
    Coleman claims 200 hours on D cell batteries so that's plenty of time, but they don't give off heat as a bonus and really require to be checked at intervals so the batteries stay at peak performance. At least one model takes D batteries though, that's a plus.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Clarksdale, MS--the golden buckle on the cotton belt
    Posts
    17,581

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    Too many battery powered lanterns give off light that is not comfortable to live with. I have a couple of LED ones, and their light is too blue. I want real light--either yellow, which feels warm, or white. The Aladdin light quality is very high and very bright, as are camping lights with mantels. This is the one that I want: https://www.lehmans.com/p-2847-aladd...-oil-lamp.aspx

    Back in 1994, we had the mother of all ice storms and were without power for 28 days. We lived in a tiny house with a fireplace and had plenty of wood, but no water and poor light. I had camping equipment so we had a propane stove and a Coleman oven box. But after 8 days of this, we went out and got a whole house generator. Got ripped off getting it emergency installed. But that generator is dead and replacing it would be VERY expensive. But that's the ideal solution for long terms without power unless one is otherwise off the grid. It ran all the lights, the furnace, the stove, the refrigerator and the freezer, but it couldn't run the house and the well at the same time.

    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Coleman claims 200 hours on D cell batteries so that's plenty of time, but they don't give off heat as a bonus and really require to be checked at intervals so the batteries stay at peak performance. At least one model takes D batteries though, that's a plus.
    "I'm a lumberjack, and I'm okay."
    Thread killer Extraordinaire



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Jun. 11, 2003
    Posts
    425

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    Parts of southern Ontario lost power in the ice storm Saturday evening. I still have no heat or electricity (or internet until I got to the office today!). Temperature in the house this morning had dropped down to a few degrees above freezing. Will worry about pipes bursting if we do not get power back by tonight.

    not having fun!



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    The Land of Buggies and Black Bumpers
    Posts
    815

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    Why not go to a portable generator? We have a used one that we picked up for about $500 that will power our well pump, furnace, refrigerator and chest freezer but we do not use it for electronics. I also have a Honda Handi 3000i portable generator for my living quarters horse trailer that can power electronics safely due to the inverter as well as a host of other things. The Honda was more expensive- about $2500- but you can have a conversation while standing right by it. Both generators we well worth every single penny! Will never be without one again!



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2003
    Posts
    146

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    Crisco Candle...supposedly lasts a long time..45 days for a large can of crisco.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RtmQuA9DGDw



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2002
    Posts
    3,652

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    The power goes out quite often in storm season around here too, but we are in a "priority" area and get it restored usually within a day. Almost everyone I know who lives outside of the main / priority lines, has a generator. It's just too dangerous to not have one, and lose power here in the winter.
    We have 2 fireplaces, and lots of wood, lots of candles, storm lamps. I wish we had a gas stove and/or a wood stove, then we'd be fine for a week or so. There are always shelters / solutions for people who lose power longer. The local University opened its cafeterias and gym facilities so local residents could come and have a warm meal and hot shower, at least.

    I have to say, tho...losing power in mild temps is a lot more fun! No electronics, yay! We play old fashioned card games and board games with kids and friends

    MTA that Lehman's Aladdin lamp linked to above is just gorgeous!
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,683

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    We had an electrician install a sub-panel so that we can power the well house and garage with a portable generator. We mainly wanted the well, but the garage is on the same run so it's included. Bonus, there's an office with a window A/C out there, so if needed we can camp in that room and stay cool.

    If it's winter, we heat with wood anyway, so no issues there.
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2002
    Location
    Calera, AL
    Posts
    1,890

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    I'll third those flower pot heaters. They really do put out a bunch of heat.
    "Dogs are man's best friend. Cats are man's adorable little serial killer." -- theoatmeal.com



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Apr. 28, 2009
    Location
    Alberta's bread basket
    Posts
    1,493

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    We have a wood stove and always keep a supply of dry cured wood available. When the power goes out you have heat and can heat food up on the top of the wood stove. Candles provide very good light, but non-flammable lanterns are safer.

    Wood stoves pump out far more heat than a regular fireplace where you lose most of the heat up the chimney.

    Generators are very good, as long as they are vented properly outdoors and keep a couple large jerry cans full of fuel. We're on a well, so the priority for us is to keep power to the well pump/sump pump and be able to power the fridge, freezer and at least a kitchen light, even if only part-time.
    http://www.mariposasporthorses.com/

    Practice! Patience! Persistence!



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    PA
    Posts
    1,034

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    Along with all the great ideas posted here, I would suggest a head lamp. I love mine when the power goes out - hands-free light makes it easier for me to accomplish most things. Mine is also convenient when the dark bay/black herd of overgrown ponies decide to hide in the woods when I have to catch someone on those dark horse show or hunting mornings. Mine is from LL Bean (a much-appreciated Christmas gift from my cousin).
    ~ A true friend knows all there is to know about you and still likes you. -E. Hubbard


    1 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
    Join Date
    Mar. 18, 2005
    Posts
    1,036

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    I have a drawer in my kitchen that has flashlights, batteries, xtra candles, stick matches and lighters.
    When ever a storm is on the horizon no matter what it is (Thunderstorm, ice storm, snow storm, high winds) I ALWAYS fill our bathtub with water, I then fill a few gallons of water for the small animals and I have also filled 50 gallon drums with water for the horses too. by filling the bathtub with water I have water to washup with and flush the toilets. I will put a bucket in the bathroom when we wash up we dump the water into the bucket and use that to flush the toilet first before adding more to it. We do have two generators. One is usually hooked to the fridge and the freezer, the second one is hooked to the tv and satalite system if winter time we hook it to our pellet stove.

    If we need to cook we generally use our grill and we use the grill to heat water for tea/coffee ect. We NEVER bring in kerosene heaters. We were out one time for almost five days. I blocked off our open stairwell with blankets, hung one between the dining room and kitchen doorway and we were able to maintain the house at about 62. Or my husband did as he ended up taking me to my Moms as I was only two weeks out of having back surgery.

    We also have a jumper pack wich we charge cellphones on too. It is always good to have a programed working weather radio too.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,855

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    We were one of the many in Ontario who lost power, and it was out for about 40 hrs.
    When I heard about the possibility of an ice storm, I filled numerous buckets of water in the barn and all the troughs. What helped was that the weather was above freezing. However, after the power went out, the temps started to drop rapidly.
    We are ok in the house, we have an excellent woodstove and a fireplace that has vents on the side, so we were warm enough, and had someplace to heat water, make tea, heat soup etc, plus plenty of candles, flashlights, batteries, as well as a solar radio, and a little crank radio (works great!).
    We are on cisterns, so we were able to scoop water from the cistern and carry it to the barn.
    My main concern is always the horses, and making sure they have water, and that the pipes in the barn don't freeze.
    We bought one of those inverters hoping we could run a little electric heater in the feed room/pump room, but it just didn't have the power to run the heater.

    Thank you for all the great suggestions/ideas. I am always amazed how dependent we are on hydro, and how almost helpless we are when it goes out.
    Now I have some more ideas (and incentive) about how to be better prepared.
    A FINE ROMANCE - JC Reg Thoroughbred - GOLD Premium CSHA - ISR/OLDNA Approved
    CSHA Brickenden Stallion Award Winner - for Performance offspring.
    Please visit A Fine Romance on FB!



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2008
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    791

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    I have been without power since last Saturday. A friend brought over a generator yesterday but since 10am till now it has used $70 of gas. That is WAY beyond my means so when it runs out that is that.

    We have a woodstove that we use along with the furnace anyhow so we have that. But no water, even with generator. I have computer hooked up so thought Id check to see if anyone else was without and see they are. Electric co just told us that it could be next MOnday before we get back on line. We have a small private power co and things are slow. We are also the absolute last house on their line.

    With all my health issues this has been so very hard. Been going across road, up to a brook in the meadow to dip water into 5 gal buckets and then drawing it back home and then out to the barn for the horses. Not fun. I am not leaving to go to a shelter, I have animals here. I have my mare, my donkey, two dogs, two cats, and a cottontail to look after.
    http://www.burlingtonfreepress.com/a...sh-but-persist

    I live in Bakersfield. They mention how extreme the conditions are here in the article. Got to go start hauling water. It is light now. I am feeling downright beat. About to keel over. Thanks for the tips above. Some of them I had not thought of and are something I CAN do. Most though I can't do without cash. Still days away from that. Many thanks are owed to the Mass. power companies that I see going by here. I don't know what would happen without their extra help. One of them even let us ride into town to the store with them day before yesterday. Very hard being nine miles up the mountain without transportation in these times.

    Sure hope anyone else suffering through the outage out there is okay. If anyone close needs any help I will do what I can. But Im not so sure I can do much as all here live far away from me. Hopefully it will all be just a bad memory soon.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Join Date
    Nov. 28, 2000
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    9,855

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    Stay safe WaningMoon. It is very hard to be out that long with critters to look after. Do you have any neighbours you can pool your efforts with?

    For me, the most stressful part is being the only one responsible for all these animals. It is literally life and death, and that is very, very stressful.
    A FINE ROMANCE - JC Reg Thoroughbred - GOLD Premium CSHA - ISR/OLDNA Approved
    CSHA Brickenden Stallion Award Winner - for Performance offspring.
    Please visit A Fine Romance on FB!



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    NM
    Posts
    1,401

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    Waning moon that sounds terrible. Could you walk your donkeys/mare to the water instead of bringing it to them? They could fill up and maybe you wouldn't have to bring them quite as much.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Aug. 23, 2003
    Location
    Mississippi, U.S.A.
    Posts
    586

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    Why is it said that you can't use an oven to heat your kitchen? I heard recently that it could cause an explosion. This week my gas oven was going full blast for seven hours while I was cooking our Christmas dinner and we're still fine. An oven is designed to stay on for hours to cook food so why couldn't you turn your oven on for a couple of hours three or four times a day for heat if your electricity is out?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Jul. 11, 2004
    Posts
    6,544

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    We've got a generator that comes on automatically when the power goes off...had natural gas piped in from the house. Has worked great and is dirt simple. Had a Kerosun heater and Aladin lamps before getting it installed 15 years ago....really prefer a generator.
    "Sic Gorgiamus Allos Subjectatos Nunc"



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