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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2000
    Posts
    308

    Default How to deal with snow sliding off indoor

    We're lucky to have an indoor this winter, but how best to desensitize my should know better horse to the sporadic blasts from the roof? The last blast left a warmblood leaping into me for safety. I'm flattered by the trust, but don't want to be squished.

    Do we just have to tough out repeated exposure?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2008
    Location
    Nowhere, Maryland
    Posts
    3,116

    Default

    It's that or climb up there and sweep it off, I'm afraid. Yesterday it kept sliding off the barn just as I was about to get on each horse-- awesome timing.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2002
    Location
    Northern KY
    Posts
    4,465

    Default he'll get used to it.

    But you do need to teach him to respect your space enough that even when frightened he doesn't jump into your lap.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,161

    Default

    Oh, I don't think he'll get used to it. Heck, I never got used to it. It startled me every time!
    All 3 of my horses, two being old campaigners who had seen it all, would still jump every time we had a landslide off the roof. Never anything dangerous, but at the very least bolting a few gallop steps with the "WHERE'S THE TIGER?!" face, nose in the air. It was rare (maybe happened once a year when we were actually in the indoor), but I lived in fear of it during the thawing months of Feb-Apr. Thankfully it was only a few seconds and then everyone would calm down once they realized what it was.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    4,947

    Default

    When the snow is regularly sliding off the roof (think warm day), turn him out in the indoor. He'll get over it.

    I lived by a railroad track. The first time the train went by, I thought my gelding was going to have a heart attack. After about the 5th time, he never picked his head up when it went by. And it was Amtrack, they weren't going slow.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 18, 2000
    Posts
    22,425

    Default

    Heels down, head up, shoulders back.
    Brothers and sisters, I bid you beware
    Of giving your heart to a dog to tear.
    -Rudyard Kipling


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2011
    Posts
    1,192

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    When the snow is regularly sliding off the roof (think warm day), turn him out in the indoor. He'll get over it.
    This, and/or a roof rake to get a the snow before it drops off on its own.

    I've also picked my battle on it too -- I knew *I'd* be horribly uptight constantly worrying about what the horse would do at the noise so I'd make him uptight constantly, therefore snowballing the whole thing. I skipped my ride till the risk was reduced.

    Depending on the type of roof and the size of the indoor, it can sound like everything is collapsing plus a train racing right through -- on a metal roof and a small indoor, it's scared the crap out of me before when I wasn't expecting it. Imagine a horse who would have no where to escape to and not the reasoning to figure out what it was!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    783

    Default

    I usually avoid riding if someone says there is ice coming off. We have 80x200' indoor, so when it starts sliding there can be a lot. My gelding can deal with a little snow coming off, and icicles dropping off also. But when the ice starts moving he still can't take it. Some days I can ride outside in the hayfield, but I've spent enough time eating dirt over the years because he's spooky. Giving up a day or two during the winter doesn't seem like much of a sacrifice.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 10, 2013
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    11

    Default

    This might be wasting a perfectly good schooling opportunity, but for a quick fix have you considered fuzzy ear plugs?

    http://www.doversaddlery.com/pom-pom...FQrxOgodDSMARw

    I have only used them on one horse. He was accustomed to them before I came along, so im not sure if they are easy to introduce. Lifesavers.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2009
    Posts
    2,826

    Default

    God I love my horse. I get so spoiled riding around bareback as snow slides off. Last week a big chunk fell off right next to us. The other two horses took off. My little ottb looked around like "What are we spooking at" and continued on his way.
    Quote Originally Posted by pinecone View Post
    I can't decide if I should saddle up the drama llama, dust off the clue bat, or get out my soapbox.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,366

    Default

    That's why some of us put shingles on our indoor arena roofs instead of metal. Might be more maintenance but one heck of a lot safer. Especially if you live and ride alone!
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2000
    Posts
    308

    Default Thank you!

    Very much appreciate the advice! Usually it's more a spring issue, but this year it snows, gets warm and snows again. I'll try earplugs and see if they help. If it were my indoor, I'd have used shingles and the snow clip thingys that prevent the snowslides, but alas I'm still a boarder...



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    2,276

    Default

    I'm lucky, I'm reading through this thread and giggling that my "super reactive hot insane off the track TB" doesn't even bat an eye when this happens.. So spoiled.

    I think you need to just ride through it. Don't think about, and don't entertain the thought of it. IMHO the first time they spook, it is okay - the second time, not so acceptable anymore.

    FWIW, I don't know if earplugs is safe - if the horse can see a lot of things flying and can't hear it (when he knows he should) he may be more apt to be over-reactive.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



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