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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 19, 2011
    Posts
    2,946

    Default Wood Burning Stock Tank Heaters

    During the 60's we had one..it had a cylinder on four stout legs and it had two pipes coming up..one for air and one for exhaust but I do not remember how we got the wood into it

    Does anyone have one, use one or know where one can be purchased.

    I did like the fact that it could freeze solid..and then we could somehow load it up with small cuts of trees or wood..and within a few hours the water was a comfortable temperature for the horses.

    Any help or suggestions is greatly appreaciated..especially if someone knows where I can order one from. Sadly..I have no welding (nor plumbing, carpentry or electrical) skills.

    I am a living rerun of Green Acres...



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    I've never heard of such a thing and had to go hunting out of curiosity... here is a thread elsewhere with photos: http://ranchers.net/forum/about56193-0.html

    Apparently you just take the lid off and load it from the top, occasionally using the hook to lift out the grate and ash pan.

    And if you want to build your own similar thing... http://www.backwoodshome.com/article...kinson138.html
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    1,504

    Default

    This current thread has some discussion of wood and, I believe, propane stock tank heaters: http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...ut-electricity



  4. #4
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    Within the last week, someone advertising on the craigslist
    for Eau Claire, Wisconsin offered two antique wood fire stock tank heaters for sale. The listing included pictures which might help you out. These were cast iron and, from the looks of the rust, pretty old.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,695

    Default

    We used a plain metal 55 gallon drum, top cut open, filled maybe 12" with large rocks for ballast, filled it about somewhat less than 1/3 with diesel and set it on fire.
    A drum would last two or three years, then rust thru.

    Do not do that in a plastic tank, only metal ones, or you will melt the plastic bottom.
    We didn't have plastic tanks in those days, just metal or concrete ones.
    I don't know how that would work with today's diesel, that is not pure, but has so many additives.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2008
    Location
    Ottawa,Ontario
    Posts
    1,640

    Default

    A friend of mine rigged up some sort of solar powered trough heater this winter. I'd like to see it in action, will it heat up a full trough during our deep freeze is what I want to know.
    The electricity to run my two electric heaters is sucking my budget dry, with Ontario having the highest hydro costs in North America, any alternative to electric heat is more than welcomed.
    "My doctrine is this, that if we see cruelty or wrong that we have the power to stop, and do nothing, we make ourselves sharers in the guilt.”
    ― Anna Sewell



  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    Up-at-5, a simple way to save a little money on your extreme cost of heating the stock tanks is this: go to a camping supply store and buy one of the pads they sell to put under sleeping bags for backpackers. These are foam and not very thick. Cut the foam to fit the shape of your stock tank. Float the foam on the surface of the water. We put our water surface covers in each night and remove them in the morning as we have around 30 horses who need access to the tank. If you only have a few, you could leave the cover on all the time and just cut a muzzle sized hole in the surface to let horses drink. We find the cover saves us around $10 per month on electricity. The pads only cost about $10 so payback is really fast and they are easy to cut with a utility knife.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,193

    Default

    I might have to try that one-we have those foam pads all over the place and I have the freezing stock tanks to experiment with.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,695

    Default

    How do you keep the horses from pulling those out of the tanks?

    We have tractor innertubes we do that with, but have to tie them to the fence, or cattle or horses flip them out of the tanks.

    I wonder if you could put those mats down AND the innertubes over them, tied to the fence and so all would stay in place and keep the water from freezing so bad?



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,193

    Default

    We're in our second week of single digits at night and 20's during the day; I can just picture all kinds of stuff frozen immobile in our water tanks! But what the heck... the cows especially are not happy without water all the time.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    May. 16, 2005
    Location
    Elmwood, Wisconsin
    Posts
    1,371

    Default

    Cowboymom, the water surface insulating foam is used with a stock tank heater, not alone. It saves some of the expense by letting the heater run less often.

    None of our horses have ever pulled the foam out of the tank. Might be they can't get hold of it or might be that they just don't find that interesting. The foam is floating on the water surface which is several inches below the top of the tank; maybe that makes the difference.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Sep. 15, 2006
    Posts
    1,509

    Default Don't know about wood fired

    But when I was younger we had one or 2 that burned kerosene in a space inside the tank. kind of dripped kero in from a top tank and had a small fire inside..
    " iCOTH " window/bumper stickers.
    http://bluemoongrafixva.webs.com



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2006
    Location
    Colorado
    Posts
    2,189



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
    Location
    gulf coast
    Posts
    962

    Default

    Some one is selling it on Ebay for $100.00. It is a top you can put on your own 55gal drum.
    Can't make link work, but search Ebay for , Stock Tank Heater Wood Burning, it is the first one. You can make it easy.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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