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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,430

    Default No mud room - how to keep the kitchen tidy near the back door.

    My back kitchen door is used by us as the main entrance into the house. Usually not a problem unless it's raining, snowy or muddy. It's a basic rectangular room, a good size. I am looking for a solution to what to do with the muddy boots and wet coats when we come into the room during bad weather. It would be nice to be able to kind of hide them from view without having to carry them dripping through the kitchen to the hall closet. We are generally on the lazy side and I have a hard time convincing everyone to remove dirty shoes much less put them away somewhere that is not convenient.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2004
    Location
    Eastern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    1,470

    Default

    Boot tray by the door, compartmentalized open-front storage for slippers or house shoes, coat tree, small chest of drawers for mitts, hats, pliers and all the other stuff that seems to collect in the entryway. Put a basket on top for wet or in-use items that you don't want to mix with clean ones in the drawers.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 12, 2010
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    976

    Default

    DH is on a job site every day, I work at a barn part time, and we have a dirt driveway. Makes for a very messy kitchen floor and we don't have a mud room.

    I have one of these:

    http://www.staples.com/office/suppli...26-195882461-2

    on the side porch and everyone is supposed to take their boots off and put them on their shelf. It works in theory, but at least they get taken off in front of the shelf and I'll usually stuff them on a shelf when I come home.

    My dream house will have a mud room with plenty of shelving for boots and hooks for coats and stuff.
    Alis volat propriis.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 24, 2006
    Posts
    1,148

    Default

    I keep a wooden crate with a mat inside it at the front door, boots get kicked into there. It goes with the country decor and you don't see boots laying all around. I also keep a towel right there for muddy dog paws.
    Kerri


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2006
    Location
    The rocky part of KY
    Posts
    9,307

    Default

    We have one of bluemc's racks also, a short one about waist high, and two boot trays and two peg racks all in the laundry room. Then out in the little hall is a little footstool/bench and two industrial carpets. What I did one year was line the laundry room floor in paper feedsacks and toss layers as they got disgusting, but what with the housepets coming inside the best we can do is slow down dirt transfer. I knew when we bought this place that the laundry room would never be big enough so if we ever have some extra money we might build a little heated enclosed porch on to the laundry room and set it up for shoes and wet overalls and such.
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
    Incredible Invisible



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar. 10, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,192

    Default

    I've had this problem and I hate it!

    What has worked for me/us as well as can be expected...in our kitchen I was able to get some stackable bins to put right next to the door, big ones on the bottom, big enough for boots on the bottom and small enough for tools/gloves on the top. Beside them is a panel of huge coat hooks that can hold many coats or a backpack (or halter as the case may be)... http://www.shelving.com/Stackable-St...FWho7Aodk1gAWw

    I buy cheap rubber backed rugs at Walmart and when they finally can't be cleaned again (I spray them off outside when weather allows, smaller ones can be washed in the washer) I throw them away and buy another one. The set of drawers closest to all this has been turned over as the junk drawers and animal supply type stuff too.

    My next house has a massive mud room with a concrete floor with a sand trap drain! So tired of the kitchen as mud room!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    12,004

    Default

    Is there room for a bench there? You can put a bench with storage under it so people have some place to put their boots and such.

    Like this or this.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2005
    Location
    The Prairie
    Posts
    5,448

    Default

    Hardest part is training the other human inhabitants to use whatever system you establish. Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.
    I love cooking with wine. Sometimes I even put it in the food.


    12 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2005
    Location
    Unionville, PA
    Posts
    3,510

    Default

    I come in through the garage or basement when it is raining/snowing!
    Delaware Park Canter Volunteer
    http://www.canterusa.org/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2009
    Location
    a little north of Columbus GA
    Posts
    1,911

    Default

    Here are plans for a mudroom bench with hooks and cubbies:

    http://ana-white.com/2011/09/smiling-mudroom

    If you search for mudroom on that site you'll find some other options, such as http://ana-white.com/2011/08/cutest-mudroom .
    --
    Wendy
    ... and Patrick



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,430

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Mozart View Post
    Hardest part is training the other human inhabitants to use whatever system you establish. Personally, I think the moderate use of shock collars in training humans should be allowed.

    Moderate??? Liberal!!!!!!!!!!!!



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,430

    Default

    We are putting a banquette in the corner nearest the kitchen door. Maybe I can extend the bench to the door and put some storage under it. I was thinking about a tile inlay at the back door because we will probably put wood floors in. However, I think that it will ultimately be ugly and I would regret doing it, as a mud room is one of the projects within in the 3 year horizon. I may just go with mats from Walmart.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,694

    Default

    Well, I built a mud room entrance to the kitchen.
    It has an entrance from the garage and from the outside.
    I have a coat closet and cabinet with drawers.
    It has an attached half bath right by it.

    Guess what, the builder made it so nice, that is where everyone comes in the house, no one ever uses the front door, so it has to be kept very neat and clean now.
    So much for a mud room!

    Coats and dirty boots are left in the garage, on a rack with a seat and room below for boots, by the mud room door.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2007
    Posts
    2,165

    Default

    Funny...as I too, ALWAYS wanted a 'mud room'....but personally? I've come to find, I don't WANT the mud 'indoors' . If it were me, (as it is a 'back door' not a formal entry) I'd find some wonderful old weathered piece you don't mind keeping 'outside'....(think outside the box....(hahahaha..no pun intended) as in: primitive looking from wear, but not expensive. Put a shallow cheap/fun awning over it for drip/water protection place collection of weathered hooks or old door knobs above for coats and hanging things, and use the piece and the under storage to kick boots off into...leave all the dirt outside.....step off onto a protected mat before entering....and dress up the sides/area with rustic planters / large terra cotta aged pots with perhaps some miniature evergreens for year round and plant around bottoms with annuals for color in summer.....
    ayrabz
    "Indecision may or may not be my problem"
    --Jimmy Buffett


    3 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2012
    Location
    In the wilds of Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ayrabz View Post
    If it were me, (as it is a 'back door' not a formal entry) I'd find some wonderful old weathered piece you don't mind keeping 'outside'....(think outside the box....(hahahaha..no pun intended) as in: primitive looking from wear, but not expensive. Put a shallow cheap/fun awning over it for drip/water protection place collection of weathered hooks or old door knobs above for coats and hanging things, and use the piece and the under storage to kick boots off into...leave all the dirt outside
    I think it really depends on where OP lives, here in the "land of 8 months of snow and ice" leaving anything you plan on wearing again outside (even in the attached garage) doesn't work for about 4 months of the year, since you'd be sliding your feet into rock solid frozen boots, and coats would freeze instead of dry.

    I do have a great hallway that is the entrance off the garage, where we have a shaker peg shelf (pegs for coats, boot trays underneath and baskets on top of the shelf for hats and gloves). My problem (thinking the shock collar might be a good idea) is that DH refuses to stick to the 4 pairs of boots limit (per person) that fits on the boot trays. Apparently he has a different pair of boots for every combination and permutation of weather and task. Tripping over the boots that overflow off the boot tray makes me crazy, especially when I get home from work at 6am and am trying to be considerate by not turning on every light in the house.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,306

    Default

    Re: leaving stuff outsidw: here in Alabama you'll find your boots full of acorns and kibble the squirrels stole from the dog dish


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2011
    Posts
    854

    Default

    I do have a mud room... and alas, I still track mud all over the house...



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2012
    Location
    In the wilds of Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    Re: leaving stuff outsidw: here in Alabama you'll find your boots full of acorns and kibble the squirrels stole from the dog dish
    Haha -- the chipmunks did that with DH's golf bag in the garage! He keeps the cover on it now!



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,694

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by katarine View Post
    Re: leaving stuff outsidw: here in Alabama you'll find your boots full of acorns and kibble the squirrels stole from the dog dish
    Or like my neighbor, that took three pairs of overshoes before he learned not to leave them outside by the door.
    The puppy had so much fun with them.



  20. #20
    Join Date
    Oct. 2, 2012
    Location
    In the wilds of Northern Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    360

    Default

    Of course, in the land of snow and ice, I also cart all my tack back and forth from home to the barn, because I can't imagine putting a frozen saddle on the horse, or putting my ar$e into a frozen saddle, even with the sheepskin cover. Good thing kidlet went away to school and allowed me to turn his old bedroom into the "indoor tackroom" (he always liked the guest room better anyway).



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