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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2009
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    New Zealand
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    Default Feed bins that rotate out (or other space-efficient designs).

    I am looking at layout of some pre-existing sheds, and may have to have a combined tack and feed room. So, I was hoping I could have some kind of bench, with feed bins/drawers underneath.

    In my mind they could be hinged at the bottom and have a handle at the top and pulled to open the top out (so the side view would be a sector of a circle) to access the feed. Does that make sense? Is there a name for this kind of bin/does anyone have experience with it?

    Or suggestions for better ways to maximise space in a 10' x 10' room? The alternative is to have that as the feed room alone and use the 13' x 13' box as a tack room, but that kind of seems like a waste (likely up to 4 horses, absolutely no more than 6).

    Ideas/suggestions?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 26, 2005
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    Back to Normal.. or as close as I'll ever get
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    9,258

    Default

    I've seen bins designed that way for kitchens, so it s/b possible for your use.
    They are used to store dry stuff like grains or flour, so smaller than you'd need but the same principle.

    My tack/feed room is 12X12. Not enclosed, just leftover space from building 2 12X12 stalls on the wall of 36X36 pole barn.
    I have room for 4 saddles (with more if needed) on hanging racks that slip over the wall along with hooks for bridles, harness & miscellaneous tack.
    Tack goes on one side along with a re-purposed kitchen cabinet and 2 small tack trunks.
    The other wall holds two 30gal & 1 10gal galvanized cans for feed plus a wire shelving unit for miscellany.
    I hung a closet rod on the back wall for saddle pads and have room leftover for odds & ends - empty feed bags, supplement buckets, etc.
    Everything is raised off the floor on pallets.

    If/when I upgrade this area I'd replace the shelving unit with enclosed storage (dust) and add some sort of shelf over the tack to replace the piece of fabric I now have stapled to the wall as a dustcover (barns sure are dusty places!).
    *friend of bar.ka*RIP all my lovely boys, gone too soon:
    Steppin' Out 1988-2004
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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar. 17, 2003
    Location
    North Texas, US
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    2,130

    Default

    Small furniture dollies! I got two from TSC for $10/ea. I use big trash cans. Put them on the dollies and they'll roll under the bench.
    www.debracysporthorses.com
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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2006
    Location
    in the garden
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    71

    Default

    It sounds like I may have the setup you are referring to (although not in the tack room). Bench on top, bins beneath. They are hinged at the bottom. The top when unlatched swings down towards me. There are springs attached so I have to pull them towards me, they don't just drop down when open (and they close on their own too). Previous owner built these. I'll see if I can get a picture and upload it somewhere.

    See if this link works
    http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/wa...ry/Feed%20Bins
    Last edited by EquineJunky; Nov. 3, 2013 at 08:12 PM. Reason: add link to pics



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2000
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    Pretty much horse heaven
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    2,824

    Default

    I have a table (made from a door for the top with four sturdy legs added) cut to the exact height and width for me to tuck Rubbermaid Brute trash cans, on wheels, with lids, under the table. The cans easily roll out for access and then tuck back in after feed is dished out. They are light enough to pick up and get any remnants of the old batch out before filling with fresh feed. Each can holds three 50-pound bags of the feed we use. A big bonus is that I can wheel the can from the feed room to the end of the barn aisle where the SUV is parked with a load of grain, open the bag sitting in the back of the SUV, fill the cans and wheel them back to the feed room. I have no spilling, no mess, and never have to actually lift a bag of grain, which is much appreciated by my back. I'm really very happy with this setup.
    Hindsight bad, foresight good.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,173

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    I have a table (made from a door for the top with four sturdy legs added) cut to the exact height and width for me to tuck Rubbermaid Brute trash cans, on wheels, with lids, under the table. The cans easily roll out for access and then tuck back in after feed is dished out. They are light enough to pick up and get any remnants of the old batch out before filling with fresh feed. Each can holds three 50-pound bags of the feed we use. A big bonus is that I can wheel the can from the feed room to the end of the barn aisle where the SUV is parked with a load of grain, open the bag sitting in the back of the SUV, fill the cans and wheel them back to the feed room. I have no spilling, no mess, and never have to actually lift a bag of grain, which is much appreciated by my back. I'm really very happy with this setup.
    Maybe I am not understanding something, but why a table and the cans under it, where you have to move them out to get feed?
    Why not the cans just standing there, against a wall and if a shelf is needed for other supplies, have one somewhat above the cans, where you can still access the grain without moving the cans?
    I am sure there is a good reason, I just don't see it.

    I love the idea of those cans having wheels.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2009
    Location
    New Zealand
    Posts
    496

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    Quote Originally Posted by 2DogsFarm View Post
    I've seen bins designed that way for kitchens, so it s/b possible for your use.
    They are used to store dry stuff like grains or flour, so smaller than you'd need but the same principle.
    Yes! That's what I was picturing. But since I don't know the name for them I can't google them.

    Quote Originally Posted by cyriz's mom View Post
    Small furniture dollies! I got two from TSC for $10/ea. I use big trash cans. Put them on the dollies and they'll roll under the bench.
    Ohhhhh now that's a good idea. And I could just put my existing [top-opening] feed bins on them.

    Quote Originally Posted by EquineJunky View Post
    It sounds like I may have the setup you are referring to (although not in the tack room). Bench on top, bins beneath. They are hinged at the bottom. The top when unlatched swings down towards me. There are springs attached so I have to pull them towards me, they don't just drop down when open (and they close on their own too). Previous owner built these. I'll see if I can get a picture and upload it somewhere.

    See if this link works
    http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/wa...ry/Feed%20Bins
    Wow, yes, that's exactly it. Thank you so much for taking a photo! Is that tin that your bins are lined with? Are they hard to fill, since the spring pulls them back? Would they be pretty heavy to open/close without the spring?

    Quote Originally Posted by Badger View Post
    I have a table (made from a door for the top with four sturdy legs added) cut to the exact height and width for me to tuck Rubbermaid Brute trash cans, on wheels, with lids, under the table. The cans easily roll out for access and then tuck back in after feed is dished out. They are light enough to pick up and get any remnants of the old batch out before filling with fresh feed. Each can holds three 50-pound bags of the feed we use. A big bonus is that I can wheel the can from the feed room to the end of the barn aisle where the SUV is parked with a load of grain, open the bag sitting in the back of the SUV, fill the cans and wheel them back to the feed room. I have no spilling, no mess, and never have to actually lift a bag of grain, which is much appreciated by my back. I'm really very happy with this setup.
    What a genius system. I couldn't quite wheel them right to the truck (there's a step up into the feed/tack room), but it would be great to easily move them around for cleaning and access.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Maybe I am not understanding something, but why a table and the cans under it, where you have to move them out to get feed?
    Why not the cans just standing there, against a wall and if a shelf is needed for other supplies, have one somewhat above the cans, where you can still access the grain without moving the cans?
    I am sure there is a good reason, I just don't see it.
    The reason I'm trying to get away from that is that a bench/shelf that is high enough to let you access the feed bins underneath without moving them is too high to work on - I want to have that space as a bench, not just a distant storage shelf. Or, for example, I could put saddle racks right above the bench and not have to worry about clearance for bin lids opening upwards or the saddles getting in the way when scooping food out.

    Thanks, guys, I'm so glad I asked. Great ideas!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 29, 2000
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    Pretty much horse heaven
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    Maybe I am not understanding something, but why a table and the cans under it, where you have to move them out to get feed?
    Why not the cans just standing there, against a wall and if a shelf is needed for other supplies, have one somewhat above the cans, where you can still access the grain without moving the cans?
    I am sure there is a good reason, I just don't see it.

    I love the idea of those cans having wheels.
    The table lets us use the space above the cans 24/7 holding stuff you can't place on can lids, or if you could, would have to move twice a day. In our case, we have a big Costco bulk box of oil with a tall pump sitting on a drip pan on top of the table, as well as supplements, peppermints, and a cookie jar filled with Mrs. Pasture's.

    We feed in the hanging fence feeders. I line them up on the table, roll out the cans (you can buy cans, wheels, and lids at Home Depot or Lowes), scoop out the feed, squirt in the oil, stir and am done.

    Table is way sturdier than a shelf and very space efficient.
    Hindsight bad, foresight good.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Jan. 29, 2000
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    Pretty much horse heaven
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by kalidascope View Post

    The reason I'm trying to get away from that is that a bench/shelf that is high enough to let you access the feed bins underneath without moving them is too high to work on - I want to have that space as a bench, not just a distant storage shelf. Or, for example, I could put saddle racks right above the bench and not have to worry about clearance for bin lids opening upwards or the saddles getting in the way when scooping food out.

    Thanks, guys, I'm so glad I asked. Great ideas!
    if you want a bench height answer, look into pet food storage bens. There are a couple that would work:

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B003NINAY4
    This has the angled access you want and the largest should hold a bag of grain. I have one for dog food (it's under our table, next to the feed cans). I find it an inefficient design because the container is twice the size it needs to be: you can't fill it below the bottom of the door or the food would fall out. I think that is a shortcoming of any slanted access door design. I also find it kind of a pain to fill compared to the flat topped containers, and definitely a much bigger pain to get the last few bits of old food poured out before putting fresh in.

    http://www.amazon.com/gp/aw/d/B00186...pi=SL500_SY115
    I think this would be a great solution. Should hold a full bag or close to it, is on wheels, and would fit under something more bench-height than my trash cans but be similarly easy to fill/move/store, etc. I had one of the slant door bens for cat food and switched to a smaller version of this as there is no wasted space. It's easy to fill, easy to empty, efficient use of space, and easy to manuver.

    You might want to visit Petsmart or Petco to look at various options.
    Hindsight bad, foresight good.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    40,173

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    I like that last link, if you don't have to move those very far and/or on rough ground and tilt it regularly to get to the bottom and to clean it.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2011
    Posts
    824

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    I have rectangular trash cans inside a giant 'medicine box' that I made. I have a 4x4 underneath one side of the trash cans so they tilt towards me. Then I have a shelf for supplements inside.

    Put the lid down and all my foodstuffs are out of sight.

    Equine Junky - I Love yours... that's what I wanted, but not what I could build.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
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    9,656

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    Quote Originally Posted by EquineJunky View Post
    It sounds like I may have the setup you are referring to (although not in the tack room). Bench on top, bins beneath. They are hinged at the bottom. The top when unlatched swings down towards me. There are springs attached so I have to pull them towards me, they don't just drop down when open (and they close on their own too). Previous owner built these. I'll see if I can get a picture and upload it somewhere.

    See if this link works
    http://s1290.photobucket.com/user/wa...ry/Feed%20Bins
    Oh man, I WANT this!! What a terrific idea . Do the liners/cans come out at all?
    Aisha, my heart from 03/06/1986 to 08/22/2008.

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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Apr. 1, 2003
    Location
    Cocoa, Fla
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    My tack/feed rm has 2 doors below counter that open. Inside opening is an area where I have a metal trash can (with lid) and feed inside - that sits on a piece of wood that has 4 wheels on it.

    Open doors - pull trash can out using trash can handles on side - dispense feed and push back under counter top (inside doors). When feed gets low dump what's left in the trash can into the trash can lid, fill with new feed, then top off with old feed from trash can lid. Keeps old feed from getting moldy and spoiling new feed.

    My tack room wall is 10 feet and has counter top - storage for some meds and feed measuring equipment, etc... - and built-in drawers for more feeding supplements/meds/etc... in drawers built into the counter spacwe next to the feed trash cans.
    Last edited by Valentina_32926; Nov. 11, 2013 at 04:39 PM.
    Sandy in Fla.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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    Default

    We have a drop down flap into the aisleway that pitchers set on a shelf inside. We load the pitchers with each horse's feed in the room and set them on the shelf, go out in the aisleway drop the flap, dump four pitchers at the time into each stall feeder, set the empties back in, and close the flap when we're done. The flap is made from 3/4" Birch plywood, and has served for probably 25 years.



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2006
    Location
    in the garden
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    71

    Default

    The liners are some type of metal - very sturdy. I can pull them up if I need to but never have.

    When they're empty and I'm refilling, I've gotten very good at resting the 40 or 50 lb bag on my hip and using the free hand to unlatch and pull down. Then I rest the bag on the side (string end pointing down), pull string and unload. If the bins aren't empty, I use my scoop to scoop the pellets/cubes closer to the front and typically with enough weight, it will stay open on its own for me to get the bag up on the side and empty.

    They can hold three 50lb bags of pellets or hay cubes. At that point (150 lbs) they start getting hard for me to pull open. Without the springs, I imagine with that much weight it would be hard to control how fast they drop down (for me - I barely weigh 110).


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Posts
    3,328

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    I didn't get them for that purpose, but I bought five huge commercial laundry carts at an auction that would really work for that. I'm guessing each one would hold 400 pounds of grain. They are rectangular with a flat top. Cost me about $40 each.
    www.crosscreeksporthorses.com
    Breeders of Painted Thoroughbreds and Uniquely Painted Irish Sport Horses in Northeast Oklahoma



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2000
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    Now In the Sandhills, NC mostly
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    6,760

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    The bins you are thinking of are dry ingredient bins. They are super spendy though!
    http://www.webstaurantstore.com/imag...edient-bin.jpg



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Feb. 7, 2013
    Location
    AZ
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    411

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    http://static.katomcdn.com/products/...0388_large.jpg

    I found one of these and use it for dog food, and it holds about 2 good sized bags. The plastic is made for restaurants and so is food-grade. I love it.
    Founding Member: Spotted Saddlebred Pals Clique

    When my grandmother's perfume bottle broke, my young second cousin said: "Nana! You smell like a French HORSE!"



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