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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2013
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    47

    Default Weigh in on this Stubben Siegfried?

    Sorry to start a new thread, I thought I might get more replies with a new heading. Anyways, This is on offer, unsure of the condition so if anyone with more knowledge of english saddles than I care to give their thoughts on this particular saddle?

    https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?...1&l=a8a95b4d39



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
    Location
    southeast Georgia
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    Whether or not you buy this saddle depends on what you want to do with it. I have a Stubben Siegfried myself and ride in it all the time, so I can tell you the advantages:

    1. Quality is excellent--I bought mine used in 1979, and it is still in good condition. I had the billets replaced once.

    2. It provides lots of security. I ride green horses, and I have been able to sit out many a spook, buck, and kangaroo-style jump at least partly thanks to my saddle. I used to jump cross-country courses in it when I was young.

    3. It's comfortable--although I realize that is a matter of opinion.

    4. It tends to fit a lot of horses, especially the QH-types.

    The disadvantages:

    1. It's not in style. People in the H/J world tend to turn up their noses at this saddle. Although there is no rule against saddles like this, it is frequently mentioned as "exhibit A" when people talk about what would not be appropriate at an A show.

    2. Many people complain that it puts them into a chair seat. It does have big thigh rolls, so this can be a problem. I remember that back in the 70s, a lot of people had the thigh rolls removed.

    3. The seat is hard, with no padding. Riders today tend to expect and prefer a cushioned seat.

    4. It's an all-purpose saddle, so many will label it "no-purpose" and steer you to a close-contact saddle for jumping.

    My advice is to think about what you want to do with the saddle and what horse you need it to fit, and make your decision accordingly. The big plus is that it will not be expensive. These saddles were hugely popular back in the day, and since they are so well-made, many of them are still kicking around. You can always find a used one for a few hundred dollars.

    As for the one in the pictures you posted, it looks to be in decent shape. I see some mildew on the billets and cracking on the panels, which probably means the saddle was occasionally used without a pad, which is what everyone did at shows back in the day. If you buy this, take it to a saddle repair shop to have the integrity of the stitching checked, especially on the billets. It should be fine, though, and probably has many years of use left in it.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne


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  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2004
    Location
    Sandgate, VT
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    942

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    The older, German-made Siegfrieds were practically indestructible. I had a student back in the early 1990s who rode in one he claimed he'd gotten in Germany around the end of WWII.

    That said, I find that they tend to fit the Tb types better than any other conformation; the longer tree points offer more support down a bigger wither, and putting them on horses with lower/no withers often results in them "perching" even if the tree width is basically correct. The saddle in the photo is definitely an older unit, and there's some significant cracking near the seat seams, but other than that, it's not possible to evaluate the soundness or safety of the saddle w/o getting hands on it. I never recommend buying a saddle without being able to try it (or at least return it if it doesn't suit), so I guess I'd recommend avoiding it unless the owner is willing to let you trial it or return it.

    More on used saddle safety at http://saddlefitter.blogspot.com/201...argain-or.html.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    3,070

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    I would figure reflocking into the price of the saddle. Most of the time these saddles have been used quite a bit and then sat for a long time and the flocking is as hard as a rock.
    I second the other poster on getting a saddler to check out the billets too.

    I personally do not care for the older Stubbens. I find them to be deeper than I like and stiffer than I like.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 8, 2007
    Location
    Maryland
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    1,436

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    I wouldn't pay more than $100 for it and I love Stubbens! The significant amount of dry cracking worries me. I have 3 used Stubbens. One looked nearly new and was priced accordingly, the other two were just barely broken in and in superb condition for around $350 each. Both were a much newer model than what you show.

    The Siegfried is known for putting people in a chair seat. Nice for jumping in rough terrain, frustrating for flat work. Some of their other models have better balance. The Roxane is pretty popular.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2013
    Posts
    47

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kitt View Post
    That said, I find that they tend to fit the Tb types better than any other conformation; the longer tree points offer more support down a bigger wither, and putting them on horses with lower/no withers often results in them "perching" even if the tree width is basically correct. The saddle in the photo is definitely an older unit, and there's some significant cracking near the seat seams, but other than that, it's not possible to evaluate the soundness or safety of the saddle w/o getting hands on it. I never recommend buying a saddle without being able to try it (or at least return it if it doesn't suit), so I guess I'd recommend avoiding it unless the owner is willing to let you trial it or return it.

    More on used saddle safety at http://saddlefitter.blogspot.com/201...argain-or.html.
    Thanks for the link, I love the photos, very helpful. Can you recommend some used saddle makes that would be a better fit for a QH than Stubben? My girl is cutting horse bred, no halter, so she's not bulldoggy or massive at all. (Here is a pic of her to give you an idea of her build: http://tinypic.com/r/cm680/5 ) The girl I got her from recommended a MW or W.

    Quote Originally Posted by Dewey View Post
    Whether or not you buy this saddle depends on what you want to do with it. I have a Stubben Siegfried myself and ride in it all the time, so I can tell you the advantages:
    I'm just looking for something to kind of "try out" english; do some hacking and low-level schooling. Doesn't need to be pretty or trendy, just functional and comfortable for the horse.


    Quote Originally Posted by gypsymare View Post
    I wouldn't pay more than $100 for it and I love Stubbens! The significant amount of dry cracking worries me. I have 3 used Stubbens. One looked nearly new and was priced accordingly, the other two were just barely broken in and in superb condition for around $350 each. Both were a much newer model than what you show.

    The Siegfried is known for putting people in a chair seat. Nice for jumping in rough terrain, frustrating for flat work. Some of their other models have better balance. The Roxane is pretty popular.
    She's asking $280 shipped for this particular saddle, no irons (but leathers included). She says she's replaced the billets but that it hasn't been reflocked. To me, it seems like a steep price considering the condition of the leather.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug. 31, 2011
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    southeast Georgia
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    OP, I have used my Stubben on QHs, and it has fit well. My current horse is an Appendix. Most of the used ones around are 31 or 31.5 (MW) width; that might work for you.

    As for this one...make her an offer. The worst thing that can happen is that she refuses.
    I heard a neigh. Oh, such a brisk and melodious neigh as that was! My very heart leaped with delight at the sound. --Nathaniel Hawthorne



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun. 20, 2000
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    Full time in Delhi, NY!
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    6,397

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    I think you can do better. Also if you think you need a 19" saddle, that one IS NOT being measured correctly. Tape measure should be placed on the button then brought to the MIDDLE of the cantle.
    ~Kryswyn~ Always look on the bright side of life, de doo, de doo de doo de doo
    Check out my Kryswyn JRTs on Facebook

    "Life is merrier with a terrier!"



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 9, 2011
    Posts
    304

    Default

    I am a big fan of the Stubben Siegfried, particularly for the uses you're listing. I agree with Kitt, if you can't get a saddler out to get their hands on it, make sure you can trial the saddle or return it in case it does not fit your horse or you. I own two siegfrieds, one that is the same era of that one and one that is a lot more modern. The older one does put me in a slight chair seat, but for your needs that won't make SUCH a big difference.

    Also, if you can't get a saddler out to check the saddle, make sure you know how to check it for safety yourself, particularly the integrity of the billets and tree. While doing your check, don't forget to look at the stirrup bars. If this is your first english saddle, it would be a good idea to have someone there with you that knows english saddles to help you out.
    All that is gold does not glitter;
    Not all those who wander are lost.
    ~J.R.R. Tolkien
    http://theimperfectperfecthorse.blogspot.com/



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2004
    Location
    Sandgate, VT
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    Default

    Can't make recommendations on width, but a flatter tree with a steepish rise and perhaps a K-type panel might be a good idea. Minimal rear panel to keep the saddle from sitting high in the rear.


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  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 2013
    Posts
    47

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kitt View Post
    Can't make recommendations on width, but a flatter tree with a steepish rise and perhaps a K-type panel might be a good idea. Minimal rear panel to keep the saddle from sitting high in the rear.
    Is the thorowgood maxam such a saddle?



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