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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2007
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    Default Sending horse on free lease; how common is it really to send saddle?

    So how common is it *really* to send a saddle out on lease with a horse?

    Let's say that you are sending your horse out on a free lease (off-site). Let's also say that horse is Stupid Wide (County XW, wider than Bates XW), but is otherwise not a difficult fit. Send suitably-wide saddle, or no?

    If you are the lessee, are you more inclined to lease a horse one way or the other?

    If you *do* send a saddle, how would you handle that situation? Obviously, written into the lease, but any other specifics?

    Thanks!
    Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous
    Capitalization is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.



  2. #2
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    Default

    I've seen it done both ways, but if I had a horse that I knew was difficult to fit, plus a saddle I probably couldn't use on another horse, I'd just send it with the leasee, personally. Leasee probably isn't going to want to buy Stupid Wide saddle for a horse they perhaps will ride for a year or two (and I'm totally stealing that terminology btw, love it!). It wouldn't be worth it to me to have my horse come back with potentially sore back, etc. I would probably write some expectations into the contract - i.e. I expect the saddle to be cleaned every time you ride in it, etc, so that everyone is on the same page. But truly, if I'm trusting someone with my beloved horse, I'm totally okay with them having a saddle that is wood and leather and totally replaceable, unlike my horse. I guess for me I'd rather risk damage or loss of the saddle than an uncomfortable situation for my horse. And if my gut tells me I can't trust someone with my saddle, I definitely don't trust them with my horse. But, saddles are very personal to some people, and if it's going to bother you to have someone else ride in it for some time, I also think you're under no obligation to include the saddle with the lease.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
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    Default

    Get a deposit equal to the value of the saddle?


    3 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
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    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    Default

    I wouldn't think it was that common unless the horse is hard to fit. Unless I currently did not own a saddle I would not want to buy a saddle to fit a lease horse unless the horse was really super duper special in some way.
    If I didn't have a saddle I would only want to lease a horse that I would buy a saddle that has a reasonable chance of fitting something else I might ride such as a basic medium tree or maybe medium wide tree. Buying a superwide tree for a lease horse wouldn't happen.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)


    2 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Dec. 4, 2002
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    Default

    Probably not a great idea to send a saddle out on a free lease. Just think of the wear and tear, potential for damage or complete ruination. Oh wait, same could be true for the horse!


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  6. #6
    Join Date
    Sep. 4, 2013
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    Default

    I'm with Pookah. If you can trust the person with your horse, you can trust them with you saddle. This way, the lessee doesn't have to buy a saddle, you know your horse's back is okay, etc. If I was the lessee, I would not want to buy a saddle for a horse I lease if the odds of it fitting other horses are low if it is a wide.

    As someone who has been a lessee, the saddle is appreciated.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Feb. 13, 2005
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    Columbus, OH
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    Default

    I've seen it done both ways, but the real linchpins are 1) do you trust a given lessee to correctly fit another saddle to your horse? and 2) will the lessee (the human, that is) fit into the saddle you send?

    I'd say "find the right lessee that you can trust with your horse, then negotiate the tack situation."
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  8. #8
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    Feb. 26, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jn4jenny View Post
    I've seen it done both ways, but the real linchpins are 1) do you trust a given lessee to correctly fit another saddle to your horse? and 2) will the lessee (the human, that is) fit into the saddle you send?
    ^This. jn4jenny hit the nail on the head. I am not concerned about possible damage to the saddle; as others have said, if I am trusting someone with my horse, why should I not trust them with my saddle?

    The concerns are exactly what jn4jenny outlined above. I currently own only one saddle (which fits both horses), so if I were to send a saddle on lease with a horse, I would have to purchase a second saddle.

    I'm sure that the tack situation can be worked out; I just wanted to gauge what another's expectations might be and try to make sure that I am not somehow being unreasonable.
    Founder, Higher Standards Leather Care Addicts Anonymous
    Capitalization is the difference between helping your Uncle Jack off a horse and helping your uncle jack off a horse.



  9. #9
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    Apr. 9, 2012
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    Default

    It's all a risk. In the case of a free anything, you're taking a risk with little or no upside. Trust (earned) and a good contract are your friend. Oh, and the ability/will to check in periodically.

    I would not want to send a very nice saddle. But I'm risk-averse and have a hard time imagining how I would be ok with a free lease, so take my opinion with a grain of salt.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2005
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    Default

    I wouldn't send my horse on lease to someone who would ride it in an ill-fitting saddle. Too narrow is quite obvious. Unless I wanted an excuse to get a new saddle, it wouldn't be happening.

    Saddles are more 'breakable' than a horse Ever see someone free-lunge a horse & have it roll? Do they wear breeches for every ride? While the basics are pretty easy (keep clean & covered), even something like a rider-fall can lead to scratches or worse...

    That being said, my friend lent out her Devocoux when she free-leased her horse. She quit riding though...



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Default

    There are so many ways that leasing does and does not work out that there is not a right or wrong way with things like this.

    Since it is your only saddle that you need to ride your other horse it seems that it might make more sense to see if the person leasing has a saddle that will work.

    Does the person leasing have a saddle to use?
    If they do why not see if their saddle fits your horse?



  12. #12
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    Aug. 3, 2010
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    for now, Ohio
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    Default

    My pony just got back from an 18 mos lease. I sent her with a saddle, girth bridle, martingale, boots, fleece sheet, and 2 saddle pads. All of it was returned in good condition with the pony. I agree, if you trust them enough with your horse, then a few hundred in tack to keep your beloved horse sound/comfortable just make plain sense. Especially since many people 'free leasing' are doing so because they can't afford to buy/pay lease a horse. In that case, they might have trouble affording the right tack for the free lease one. Just a thought.
    I just leased (paid) my AO horse out to a 3' rider, and the only thing I sent with her was her happy-mouth schooling bit. They were looking for an upper level show horse. I figured they had the funds to support getting her tack that worked for both of them.
    but for a free lease situation, just inventory all the equipment and put it on the lease contract. Then the leasors are held accountable for returning all the tack when the lease ends.
    A good man can make you feel sexy, strong, and able to take on the world.... oh, sorry.... that's wine...wine does that...



  13. #13
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    Nov. 17, 2006
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    Default

    What type of saddle are you talking about? High end saddle? If high end, I would probably keep that saddle and finder a less expensive one that fits to send with the horse. Keep the high end saddle for your other horse. If lower end saddle, sure, send it along if you would rather find another one for your other horse. I would definitely write it into the lease that it must come back in same condition. And take pictures of it before it goes. You never know. Accidents happen.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Sep. 27, 2010
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    Default

    If you trust them with your horse, I would hope you could trust them with a piece of tack. Have it written into your contract and keep in mind that you can add tack coverage to your horse insurance (which I hope you already have!).
    Cavalo



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2003
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    Boston Area
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    Default

    If you need to buy a second saddle, I'd try to find a less expensive saddle to send with the leased horse.

    I would rather risk the saddle than risk having my horse ridden in a saddle that didn't fit.
    Equine Ink - My soapbox for equestrian writings & reviews.
    EquestrianHow2 - Operating instructions for your horse.



  16. #16
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    Nov. 30, 2005
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    Northfield MN
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    Default

    I would send the saddle if it didn't fit any of my other horses, but in the OP's case, I would not put myself in the position of having to purchase a new saddle for my other horse.

    Unless I was looking for a good excuse to buy a new saddle...



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Apr. 16, 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bogie View Post
    If you need to buy a second saddle, I'd try to find a less expensive saddle to send with the leased horse.

    I would rather risk the saddle than risk having my horse ridden in a saddle that didn't fit.
    This. If the leasee doesn't have a proper saddle that will fit the horse, buy one that will but maybe lower end so it won't be an issue if it comes back with scratches, etc. I'd be more concerned about the saddle they will be using fitting the horse. That way you still have your saddle for your other horse.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Dec. 31, 2010
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    600

    Default

    When I free leased my horse, all of the tack came with the horse. That way there was no concern that I would use the wrong tack on the horse, and that everything fit. In the contract it said "you break it, you buy it" with respect to both the horse and the tack.



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