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  1. #1
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    Feb. 3, 2013
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    Default Human Euthanasia?

    Anyone have an illness ... KNOW someone that has one.
    Discuss?



  2. #2
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    No, but I bumped this because I am interested in the topic and hope others will see this thread and respond.
    Founder of the People Who Prefer COTH Over FB Clique
    People Who Hate to Rush to Kill Wildlife Clique!
    "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique



  3. #3
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    Aug. 30, 2011
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    Default

    Not sure what the question really is. OP - do you want a referral or do you want to have a discussion about the morality thereof/ ethical issues surrounding it?
    Unrepentant carb eater


    1 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Not at the moment, but I've had friends suffering horribly from terminal illnesses say to me and their doctors, "I would never put a horse through this, why is it happening to me?" Several years ago a friend's mother dying of Lou Gherig's disease said through her computer (because she could no longer talk, let alone relieve her own suffering) "Why am I still here? My doctor promised he wouldn't let this happen to me." And then there's the friend who lost her father to lung cancer. She repeatedly tells the story of how she asked a nurse to up her father's morphine, the nurse refused, saying "we have to be careful not to snow him," to which my friend ask "why?? Is a little more time suffering important for some reason?"

    My grandfather hung himself from the barn rafters when he got a cancer diagnosis in his mid 90's. Made sense to me.


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  5. #5
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    Default

    Well, you have all those hospices out there taking care of those that don't want heroic measures taken to keep prolonging their lives, as hospitals are mandated to carry on for most patients under their care.

    If that is not what you want, suicide can be an alternative, but better not wait too long, until you can't carry it on your own.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    I have a debilitating disease that I've been able to live with so far. If/when the time comes that it is just too much, or when age starts to take its toll, I plan on choosing to end my life. My husband feels the same way.

    Rebecca


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  7. #7
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    If you live in oregon or washington state and have a terminal illness you can receive assistant suicide from a medical doctor. People shouldn't have to suffer. There is also an hbo documentary about it too that I recommend people watch. http://www.hbo.com/documentaries/how...e&cmpid=ABC177
    I want to be like Barbie because that bitch has everything!


    7 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Jan. 28, 2003
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    I certainly hope euthanasia is legal in all 50 states by the time I am old
    "You can't really debate with someone who has a prescient invisible friend"
    carolprudm


    10 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    My grandfather is dying at this moment... it's been a long process and while not painful, I don't think, it's been confusing for him and stressful for my grandmother and horrible for my dad.... Grandpa had started sleeping in his chair all day only to go to bed and sleep all night... started need a lot of personal care help and had fallen a couple times at home.. and out of the blue asked his doctor for sleeping pills. The doctor turned him down. We all think Grandpa had a moment of clarity.

    He would not recognize himself...

    I watched a show on PBS a few weeks ago about a group that did underground assisted suicide with helium... they got busted and it was a big mess. Sad show to watch in the middle of the night.



  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RMJacobs View Post
    I have a debilitating disease that I've been able to live with so far. If/when the time comes that it is just too much, or when age starts to take its toll, I plan on choosing to end my life. My husband feels the same way.

    Rebecca
    I'm in the exact same boat, Rebecca. I've been very upfront with my family. I am not willing to live a miserable, confined life in constant pain. I understand the slippery slope, but I am all for human euthanasia within reasonable limits.
    Nine out of ten times, you'll get it wrong...but it's that tenth time that you get it right that makes all the difference.


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  11. #11
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    I have been told by paramedics that even if a patient had a living will that declared "no heroic measures" they would still have to do all they could to revive that patient.

    Of course there is no law, I guess, that says you have to call the paramedics ... if you are lucky enough to be at home and not in a hospital at the time ...
    Founder of the People Who Prefer COTH Over FB Clique
    People Who Hate to Rush to Kill Wildlife Clique!
    "I Sing Silly Songs to My Animals!" Clique


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wellspotted View Post
    I have been told by paramedics that even if a patient had a living will that declared "no heroic measures" they would still have to do all they could to revive that patient.

    Of course there is no law, I guess, that says you have to call the paramedics ... if you are lucky enough to be at home and not in a hospital at the time ...
    If you're at home, you're right, no one needs to call the paramedics. And if you're in the hospital and have a signed DNR on file, they can't do a damned thing. The problem in the hospital is that it's a bit more difficult to euthanize, particularly if there is no one there to assist. (As the current law sits)
    Nine out of ten times, you'll get it wrong...but it's that tenth time that you get it right that makes all the difference.



  13. #13
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    Default

    One of the best stories I've ever read about the topic: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/...es-him/307916/



  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wellspotted View Post
    I have been told by paramedics that even if a patient had a living will that declared "no heroic measures" they would still have to do all they could to revive that patient.

    Of course there is no law, I guess, that says you have to call the paramedics ... if you are lucky enough to be at home and not in a hospital at the time ...
    If you have a DNR we absolutely do not resuscitate. I personally laid over one of my patient's chest as they called a code before I could hand them the paper work. The trick is, we have to have the paper. We can't just take your word or your family member's word. Have it handy at all times.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Wellspotted View Post
    I have been told by paramedics that even if a patient had a living will that declared "no heroic measures" they would still have to do all they could to revive that patient.
    This depends on state law. In Texas, it is true that the paramedics cannot honor the terms of a 'living will.' But, one can complete a separate form that allows EMS to not take heroic measures. The trick is making sure that form is available- on the fridge or wherever the patient might be- if they are called.

    And- beware the pitfalls of phrasing on living wills in hospitals. Sad to say based on recent experience, the patients are not really patients, they are revenue streams, and if the will says no heroic measures and do not treat if my condition is hopeless- the docs will simply not say that things are hopeless, and continue to run as many tests and treatments and involve as many docs as possible- even when the person with medical power of attorney is in their face. It's pretty deplorable, really.


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  16. #16
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    My dad verbalized that he wished it were an option while dying of ALS. I was actually surprised that he didn't do it himself when he had the means and the ability, but it's different to put yourself down than to have a doctor do it.

    I am completely in favor.
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG


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  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Renn/aissance View Post
    My dad verbalized that he wished it were an option while dying of ALS.
    Not wishing to divert the thread, but I knew an avid foxhunter, dying of ALS, who hunted as long as he could- long after he could no longer speak. He wore a huge neck brace out of necessity in order to ride, which did not leave room for any type of head covering. When I overheard someone tsk tsking during hunting that he didn't have a helmet on, I was thisssss close to euthanizing a perfectly healthy individual...


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  18. #18
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    Hats off to that gentleman, no pun intended, for continuing to do what he loved as long as he was able.
    "I'm not always sarcastic. Sometimes I'm asleep."
    - Harry Dresden

    Horse Isle 2: Legend of the Esrohs LifeCycle Breeding and competition MMORPG


    8 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    My dad walked in on my grandpa with a gun to hiss head shortly after a terminal diagnosis. Dad says if he'd known how horrible the final year of his life was going to be, he would have offered to pull the trigger instead of talking him out of it. I'm all for assisted suicide.


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  20. #20
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    Feb. 16, 2012
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    Just to clarify some things. "Physician Assisted Suicide" is NOT where the physician sits quietly by your side, and administers a lethal dose of barbituates. It's against their Hippocratic Oath, and thereby, illegal in ALL 50 states. But, what Oregon does, is "allows" a physician to write a prescription for a lethal dose of medication, that the patient takes at his own time, alone, or with family if they so choose.
    I personally believe we should be entitled to a peaceful end like our furry friends, but, not likely to happen in the states unless they do away with, or change the Hippocratic Oath.
    If I should come down with a painful, terminal illness, as tempting as it would be to "take my life (death) into my own hands"...I could not be so selfish as to take away from my family, the right to be paid my life insurance payout. I just couldn't do that to them.



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