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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,053

    Default Two-point changed my life. (Dressage convert)

    I am a former dressage rider whose achy hips drove me to ride in a close contact saddle. Because none of my rides are very long, and I can't ride every day, I just lowered my expectations to having fun and enjoying my horse, the best one I've ever had.

    Off and on for the last year, I have had my horse in training to learn how to jump. I don't jump myself, but since I don't expect to own my horse forever, I wanted him to have that skill set. What do you know--he's good at it!

    So just in the last few months, I have started riding in one group lesson a week. Little by little, I have started to gain confidence. Dressage lessons are mostly private lessons, and I found that one of the benefits of riding in a group is that I have to just deal with whatever I am afraid of or think my horse is going to be afraid of. I can't stop and "discuss." It's been liberating, and I am trusting my horse to go on on-the-buckle trail rides for the first time in the three years I have owned him.

    But the biggest change has come from riding in two-point. At first, it was kicking my a$$! But my strength has built up and now I can go around and around, and I am now jumping ground poles. I know it's only fake jumping, but geez, it's fun.

    On top of that, with the increased use of large muscle groups...

    I lost five pounds! That same five pounds I have wanted to lose for the last three years.

    My position has improved dramatically. I don't have to wiggle around and fix anything. I walked by the mirrors today, and dang, I look like I know how to sit on a horse! I know that sounds stupid, but after 25 years of riding (and I was in my early 30's when I started), I have lost that ammy look to my leg. And my seat--please explain how getting up out of the saddle improves how you sit in it, but I just feel so much more supple and secure.

    The biggest deal for me is that at my age and with all my infirmities and stiffness, I really was resigned to never improving again. Ever. But now I feel like a different rider.

    So...THANK YOU, TWO-POINT!

    I will let y'all know when I go over my first cross rail.
    Last edited by Bristol Bay; Oct. 18, 2013 at 12:00 AM.
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    18 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2

    Default

    Getting your tush out of the saddle requires you to find and hold onto your center of gravity, which is something that carries over once you sit down. It also builds core strength, which again, is used when sitting in full seat.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    4,342

    Default

    How refreshing. I enjoyed your post. I think it is great that you are learning AND having fun. Bet your horse is having fun, too! Keep up the good work.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2013
    Posts
    418

    Default

    Love this post!!! Can't wait to hear your jumping adventures!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    Faye, didn't you start the thread on mature riders learning to jump? I'm not sure I will ever get to eight fences, but I sure am having fun. Tomorrow I have a private lesson (with a neck strap) to get us cantering over cavaletti. I'm really jazzed about it. Horsey is a really round, bascule-y jumper, so not the easiest to learn on, but he is a cheerful, confident horse who likes that job.

    Thanks for all the encouragement!
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan. 9, 2012
    Posts
    1,994

    Default

    That's awesome

    And on the flip side, dressage is improving MY seat. I think exposure to several disciplines is really helpful.
    Blog chronicling our new eventing adventures: Riding With Scissors



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul. 31, 2006
    Location
    Indiana
    Posts
    1,337

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by PaintedHunter View Post
    That's awesome

    And on the flip side, dressage is improving MY seat. I think exposure to several disciplines is really helpful.
    Agreed!

    I have been a long time hunter/jumper rider and now board at an eventing barn. Actually riding in a dressage saddle and not just doing my flat work in a jump saddle has tremendously helped me.

    Hope you continue to have fun and learn a lot! Jumping so a lot of fun! Especially when you have a horse that loves it as well. Keep us updated!
    There is something about the outside of a horse that is good for the
    inside of a man.

    -Sir Winston Churchill



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    519

    Default

    Hooray! Such an encouraging post! Thank you for spreading your good learning experience and keep up the good work. Looking forward to more updates to come



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 18, 2003
    Location
    Brenham, TX
    Posts
    4,972

    Default

    You never know where it will lead! I never jumped as a kid. Did some jumping in my 30's but developed fear issues and swore off jumping. Decided to stick to dressage (which is what I started doing in my early 20's.)

    Then I bred a mare that was born to be a hunter (was supposed to be a dressage horse.) Put her in training to sell. She failed a PPE and had to have surgery. Put her back into training after she recovered. Started jumping cross rails myself (just trotting fences for a LONG time.) This year I have been showing in Long Stirrup (including an AA show and an A show, in addition to our local circuit) and loving it. We have SO much fun at my barn (small group, not snooty at all.)

    Got to show my trainer's "point and shoot" horse a couple times, which was awesome. Took a while to put in a great round on my horse (she is a bit of a technical ride but has a good temperament) but finally did it and got a 4th out of 25 in the warm up over fences class, which included professionals!

    I plan to move up to 2'3 an 2'6" next year. Not sure if I will ever get beyond 2'6" but am not completely ruling it out. But, I may just show in the Modifieds for the rest of my career - LOL

    Anyway, have fun and you never know - we may see you in the Long Stirrup/Rusty Stirrup division one of these day! :-)
    Triple J Ranch Sporthorses
    www.triplejsporthorse.com
    Member - OMGiH I LOFF my mare(s) clique


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 7, 2013
    Posts
    418

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Faye, didn't you start the thread on mature riders learning to jump? I'm not sure I will ever get to eight fences, but I sure am having fun. Tomorrow I have a private lesson (with a neck strap) to get us cantering over cavaletti. I'm really jazzed about it. Horsey is a really round, bascule-y jumper, so not the easiest to learn on, but he is a cheerful, confident horse who likes that job.



    Thanks for all the encouragement!
    That was me!!! Please report back on your jumping lesson!!! Can't wait to hear and I want details!

    I tried dressage lesson once and the trainer there told me that keep riding hunter jumper my back will die..... WTF.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Oct. 3, 2012
    Posts
    2,053

    Default

    Lesson Report: We Cleared 6"!!!!

    It was so fun.

    The flat part of the lesson went very well. Two-point trotting is more work that cantering. But you guys knew that. So after a nice long walk break, out came the neck strap. It was such a confidence builder. My worst fear is not releasing enough and tripping my horse up or punishing him in the mouth on the other side of the "jump," so the neck strap eliminated that possibility and we flew over the 6" cavaletti many times, trot and canter.

    I love my trainer. I am making so much progress with her instruction.

    Best of all, we are lucky to have a retired SJ Hall of Fame trainer at our facility. She doesn't take on new clients, but she has taken a fairy godtrainer interest in my progress, mostly because she loves my horse. I don't care why--it's just such an honor to have words of encouragement from her.

    Next goal: 12"
    A helmet saved my life.

    2014 goal: learn to ride like TheHorseProblem, er, a barn rat!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 17, 2006
    Posts
    4,342

    Default

    Sounds awesome, Bristol. Your enthusiasm is contagious.
    “Be yourself; everyone else is already taken.”
    ¯ Oscar Wilde



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