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  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    HEARD one in NE CT many years back. Made my hair stand on end.Had no idea what the hell it was, then a few days later we heard that there had been sightings.

    These things have huge ranges. Large carnivores can really move far in just a day. Even domestic cats can get a good move on.
    I heard one in Pennsylvania back in 1977 or thereabouts. I was a teenager. It screamed outside our farmhouse one night and scared everyone half to death. Yes, our hair did stand on end...literally. An unreal sound.

    It was years before we realized what we'd heard watching some sort of nature show. We'd all been told there were no mountain lions left in PA so it didn't occur to us.



  2. #22
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    Feb. 24, 2011
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    It's not exactly the east coast, but they are in northern Michigan as well. My mom was cross country skiing near Traverse City last winter and saw tracks. There are wolves back in that area as well.



  3. #23
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Daydream Believer View Post
    I heard one in Pennsylvania back in 1977 or thereabouts. I was a teenager. It screamed outside our farmhouse one night and scared everyone half to death. Yes, our hair did stand on end...literally. An unreal sound.

    It was years before we realized what we'd heard watching some sort of nature show. We'd all been told there were no mountain lions left in PA so it didn't occur to us.
    no nittanies?



  4. #24
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    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    The jaguarundi is about twice the size of a domestic cat. It has two color phases, one grayish, the other reddish. Length of males is about 3 feet, 6 inches, of which the tail is more than half.

    Considered extremely rare in Texas, habitat is Mexico and the Rio Grande Valley.... we are 500 miles north in the middle of several million people but have one that lives in the protected four acres behind our place (owner died, kids who live elsewhere maintain the property)

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...ter/kitty2.jpg

    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...Picture047.jpg



  5. #25
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    Aug. 12, 2010
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    I have not, but my husband swears he saw one in our front yard a few weeks ago:

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...-think-this-is

    Terrible picture, but the consensus seems to be that it is a mountain lion. I've had a widlife camera out in the area where he saw the cat, but have, so far, only gotten pictures of deer, raccoons, rabbits and woodchucks. There are certainly bobcats in and out of our yard, I have good daylight pictures I took, directly, of them. And coyotes walk right up the driveway as if they own it . If there are mountain lions in the area, I wouldn't be surprised if they came here...the prey opportunities are pretty good, as deer congregate here to steal our apples.



  6. #26
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    Jan. 14, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    I have not, but my husband swears he saw one in our front yard a few weeks ago:

    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...-think-this-is
    Yes, I like that thread because the attitudes of disbelief that people on that thread experienced are what drive me crazy.

    I also believe I have seen a wolf but am afraid to tell anyone because I'm certain they will not believe that. But whatever that was was a good deal taller and heavier than an average coyote and had a thicker snout. I did not think it was a wolf when I saw it but was distinctly startled at how large it was and how it did not look like your average coyote. Now I wonder...

    I love where I live. There is so much around here - I've seen moose, pilieated woodpeckers, scarlet tanagers other amazing bird life, bears, otters (and pita beavers), moose, fisher cats (unfortunately), even black squirrels. And now a mountain lion. It's amazing.

    I'm torn between wanting someone to acknowledge them and educate and also feeling glad that they are not acknowledged so that there is no outcry about them from the citiots.



  7. #27
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    Jan. 14, 2003
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    The jaguarundi is about twice the size of a domestic cat. It has two color phases, one grayish, the other reddish. Length of males is about 3 feet, 6 inches, of which the tail is more than half.
    That is very cool!



  8. #28
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    Mar. 2, 2007
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    Upper and Lower Canada
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    I was birdwatching along a logging road with my dog near my camp in the late 90s, at around 6 in the morning. Dirt road, tall, dense shrubs on either side. About 2 hours north of Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, near La Tuque.

    Something started screaming at us from the bush, it was moving parallel to us, staying hidden. My dog (a shepherd cross who normally wasn't afraid of anything, including bears) was afraid and crept at my heels. I had no idea what it was but decided to scream back and scare it away. I turned around and saw a long, tawny, skinny tail disappear behind a rock, and then put two and two together. No one mentioned cougars in Eastern Canada in those days.

    My dog always stayed very close to me whenever we walked along that road again.



  9. #29
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    Aug. 12, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    I'm torn between wanting someone to acknowledge them and educate and also feeling glad that they are not acknowledged so that there is no outcry about them from the citiots.
    That's my feeling too. Bears started showing up, in numbers, in our suburban town last spring. I'm pretty sure I know why...it was that Adam Sandler movie filming in a heavily wooded area that drove them out of their usual hang out and into back yards.

    Some people were freaking out about the bears...fortunately, our Animal Control and Police departments have done a pretty good job of educating people that the level of danger from them is pretty much nil if you just leave them alone. If people don't want them in their yards, they are told to bring their bird feeders in and secure their garbage cans in the house. Controlling panic over a mountain lion might be harder to do.



  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    Controlling panic over a mountain lion might be harder to do.
    Yeah, considering people in the 'burbs will call the police or animal control in a panic when they see a fox or coyote standing at the edge of their yard. Many people should just really stick to living within city limits and leave the countryside to those of us who appreciate open space and all that comes with it. Instead, they move and then bitch when farm smell and wildlife rear their ugly heads.


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  11. #31
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    Jul. 13, 2011
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    East Longmeadow, MA
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    Wow, this is amazing! Some of you guys who have seen one are not too far from me. We have 4 acres that is mostly woods, we have seen lots of deer, a bobcat, have heard a fisher, lots of wild turkeys, but no mountain lion. Yet. Winter before last we had coyote tracks right up to our back porch.
    What's wrong with you?? Your cheese done slid off its cracker?!?!



  12. #32
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    Jun. 24, 2005
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    There are regular sightings of Panthers or mountain lions in Alabama and Florida, even though the Fish & Wildlife people insist they are extinct for many years now.
    You can't fix stupid-Ron White



  13. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by sketcher View Post
    Yeah, considering people in the 'burbs will call the police or animal control in a panic when they see a fox or coyote standing at the edge of their yard. Many people should just really stick to living within city limits and leave the countryside to those of us who appreciate open space and all that comes with it. Instead, they move and then bitch when farm smell and wildlife rear their ugly heads.
    Yeah, someone here was worrying about the foxes, skunks and raccoons in their yard being a danger to their new baby. Ummmm...only if you plan on leaving your baby out alone in the yard all night .

    We've seen pretty everything known for sure to hang out here in our yard, except the lone moose that was passing through town last year. I can't say any of the wildlife concerns me at all. I'm not going to go try to pet the coyotes, bears or bobcats and they certainly have no interest in getting close to me either. The fisher is a nasty thing, but it's not going to stalk me...I just left it alone when it was hiding under our shed last year and kept the dogs away.

    Mountain lion? If cat is ever confirmed for sure, I'd maybe take a few precautions as far as young boy, elderly mother and dogs hanging around the wooded edges of the property alone goes, but I'm not going to lose any sleep over it...it's not like the cat is going to come in the house and get us in our sleep!



  14. #34
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    Jul. 28, 2011
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    We saw one about 45 minutes outside of Chattanooga a couple years ago. We were driving at night on a twisty mountain road and it was on the side of the road dining on a deer carcass. I told DH and he didn't believe me so I had him turn around and go back. He stayed around long enough for DH to catch and glimpse and then high tailed it up the hill.



  15. #35
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    Sep. 18, 2007
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    FL
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    They have been seen in Petersham, MA as long ago as 20-25 years by very CREDIBLE sources. I think even a picture ,though hazy. Wildlife people swear it isn't so!?!?!



  16. #36
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    Oct. 21, 1999
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    Rochester, NY
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    I never thought of the possibility that the wildlife authorities are denying the existence of these cats to protect them. It makes sense, in a strange sort of way. There have been sightings south of here for years, always denied. Now, maybe I won't think those guys are quite as blind.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  17. #37
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    By the big sheep if you are talking about the one in Princeton MA a few weeks ago, that was said to be a bear because a bear came the next night to eat the carcass so not sure how you prove that was a bear one way or the other. The bear was caught on a neighbor's wildlife cam. The presence of bear droppings and hair including only bear tracks around the site confirmed it was a bear. The goat that was killed had the DNA tested and it came back as feline. Yes, bobcat. Definitively bobcat. So, perhaps you are taking about a different goat or sheep? There were also a goat and a sheep killed last week in Hardwick which is very close to here so maybe you are thinking of those. I have no idea of those. Those were bear.

    And I have to disagree about "7 cats moving through New England". Disagreement acknowledged. I was one of the people confirming evidence on the cats. I would say 7 would be a lot of sightings for a very, very elusive animal. I consider myself so lucky to have seen one. It's a lot of sightings for this area for people spotting them from their yards, on roads, on well travelled trails, etc. It's actually lower than expected for those who track in wooded and wet areas where people, trail riders or bike riders don't usually go. And really, what difference does it make if they are passing through or if they are living here. Ecologically it makes an enormous difference. They are here. And it is absurd to think they are going to pass through and never decide that this is actually a pretty good place to live. Those of us studying and tracking the incidents wish they would.There is the right habitat and plenty of food with little competition.

    And the farmer in the town next door - a 'real' bona fide breeder of cattle, sheep, goats, chickens for meat - says he has seen both a male and female and is certain there is a small breeding population in the area. I'd love to talk to him. Being a breeder of livestock doesn't equate with being able to identify wildlife but if he's seeing 2 definitely different ones at different times over a period of time he may have some useful information. I'm not sure how he's identified the sexes though. Sexing cougars is usually done by identifying the guard hairs of the penile sheath or the silver hairs on the male's scrotal sac. If he's been able to do that, he's getting *way* too close. And it makes sense. We have the habitat and plenty off food. He's a farmer and I'm pretty confident he can tell the difference between a ML and a bobcat and I'd place a high degree of confidence in his ability as a decades long breeder or all kinds of livestock, to have a fair shot at distinguishing a male form a female. Wildlife biologists have a hard time sexing cougars unless they have them tranquilized, the animal is dead or if the animal is treed and there are binoculars being used.

    Eventually wildlife officials will have to acknowledge them instead of treating those of us who have seen them like we are claiming to have seen 'bigfoot' . I understand being perplexed over lack of acknowledgement, but please understand that right now with current statistics for MA, CT and RI are 800 sightings reported annually with only 7% resulting in actual wildlife evidence. Which is usually bobcat, lynx, coyote, fisher, etc. I'm sorry that you feel it's a personal slight that nobody in an official capacity is justifying you. The BigFoot comment is not to mock those who see possible cougars, it was used as an example of how often cougars are actually seen. As in it's rare. Just like they used to do with coyotes and with moose...unless you do not believe they are around either?
    Of course I believe they're around. Apologies for causing you to feel the need to insult. I definitely believe in coyotes, I've rehabbed over 70 of them personally. I believe in moose too, but those are dangerous and I don't rehab those.

    If we do end up with resident breeding cougars, the general public will be informed for safety reasons.
    With migratory animals, the less publicity on it is probably the best idea. Media stories of a coyote grabbing a small dog results in mass executions of coyotes in a large area. And also usually results in a dead pet dog or two due to overzealous and inexperienced shooters or trappers.
    I can't imagine the mass hysteria of reported cougar activity. And for clarification; by mass hysteria I am not insinuating you personally.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


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  18. #38
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    Jan. 14, 2003
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    Obviously 'sexing' something from a distance is difficult so I can believe he has seen two different animals. Perhaps they are different ages, different genders or whatever. But it is not to difficult to sex many animals such as dogs or horses with a decent accuracy if you have an experienced eye. And he most certainly has an experienced eye.

    But lookie here, a document on mountain lion identification including how to identify genders. And btw, according to this document, hunters are required to be able to identify the gender. Besides the 'black spot' there is also size or the animal andpaw print size. I have not trouble believing this guy could have a shot at identifying between the two, especially if there were a female around that he was familiar with and a transient male showed up to breed - all of a sudden you have a sighting of a much larger cat in addition to the smaller one. It's not like they hang around in herds.

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j...53899372,d.eWU

    And what you are saying above - the difference between migratory and resident - I do not care one whit. What is annoying to me is when I am told I did not see what I really saw.

    I do not care to enter into the debate of where they live and how long they stick around although I am idly curious as to why people think the big kitties would migrate through from the west or up north and not decide to eventually set up shop and stick around. where there is supportive habitat.

    And as far as the bobcat saliva? Yep, it probably was. However, I regard anything that comes out with a healthy degree of cynicism because obviously officials do not want to acknowledge them. People around here have seen the cat. It is common knowledge. It (or they) have been around here for a long time and people are ridiculed by wildlife folks and basically told they do not know what they are seeing.



  19. #39
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    It's not much different than horse people rolling their eyes a little bit about non-horse people saying some stuff.

    I can't understand why it's so annoying to you. I've tried to explain that why wildlife has some healthy skepticism about reports of sightings. If you received hundreds and hundreds of calls annually for something that is exceedingly rare/unusual then statistics alone state that at least 99% of the calls are incorrect.

    I do hope you can see how things do become skewed...the recent reports have 200 lb sheep (extremely rare for size but sounds good for the prey to be bigger), etc. Just in this conversation the feline DNA was italicized as if proof of a very rare large cat instead of a very common smaller cat, I'm not sure why that was used in the conversation if it was known as definitely not cougar DNA. Losing animals to bobcats isn't very uncommon.
    You weren't sure why it was known it was a bear, under the impression that it could have been a cougar nobody would admit to when it was already known 100% to be a bear due to visual, uncontested proof.
    And the farmer friend knew animals well enough that you were confident in his identification of 2 separate and different cougars, their genders and that he would be one to know if there were a breeding pair in the area. And then shortly after it changes to it's obvious that it's difficult to identify gender.
    His experienced eye is not going to be able to gender-ID a large cat. It's simply not possible.
    Print size wasn;t mentioned despite a lot of other information. Print size can denote a mature vs juvenile cat, not just gender. And it's common for a female to travel with an adult offspring. They care for their young for 2+ years depending. Also age of print, speed animal was moving, recently fed cat vs hungry/empty cat and footing the print is in all affect size.
    A female in heat is simply not going to be seen. And definitely not where people live. The very elusive cat becomes twice as elusive when it comes to breeding. They go to very remote locations. A female will call for a male when she's in heat, farmer would have mentioned that. And a male would have to be close enough to hear for him to show up. The chances of 2 of them living in this area within hearing of one another is astronomical.

    You can see how information changes often enough that it's very difficult to ascertain the validity of reports of sightings. People become so very sure of what they've seen, yet what they then report doesn't make sense in regards to a positive large cat ID.

    If the annoyance is simply that you, personally, feel slighted then I'm sorry you feel that way.

    Thank you for the link, I do know the logistics of sexing a large cat.

    I'm sorry you don't care about the difference between migratory vs resident animals, but I wasn;t debating. I was trying to answer your questions on why wildlife officials haven't substantiated your reporting or other reportings. The difference between the 2 are very significant in answering that question.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
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    Dec. 30, 2002
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    Ontario, Canada
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    Quote Originally Posted by Vesper Sparrow View Post
    I was birdwatching along a logging road with my dog near my camp in the late 90s, at around 6 in the morning. Dirt road, tall, dense shrubs on either side. About 2 hours north of Trois-Rivieres, Quebec, near La Tuque.

    Something started screaming at us from the bush, it was moving parallel to us, staying hidden. My dog (a shepherd cross who normally wasn't afraid of anything, including bears) was afraid and crept at my heels. I had no idea what it was but decided to scream back and scare it away. I turned around and saw a long, tawny, skinny tail disappear behind a rock, and then put two and two together. No one mentioned cougars in Eastern Canada in those days.

    My dog always stayed very close to me whenever we walked along that road again.
    I've heard of lots of cougar sightings over the past few years. Unfortunately there have been at least 2 horses killed in my area that were attributed to cougars, although I don't think that was ever proven. I would love to see a big cat in the wild. I've seen 2 lynx, but never a cougar.



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