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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
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    430

    Question Pedal Osteitis - how to determine if my horse has it?

    My 5yo Tall Han mare is sore from time to time as evidenced by not wanting to go forward, especially at the canter, and more to the left. My farrier was wondering if is might be from Pedal Osteitis (http://www.anvilmag.com/farrier/012f4.htm) symptoms, in which case support in the form of a heartbar shoe would be used as support while she is still growing (like a weed.. nearing 17hh). It seems to kick in more after a new shoeing. She is fine on the L Line, but when I get on, she wants me off. She has a lovely nature so this is not a training issue. I can do a lot of transitions until she finally goes forward. She will still jump, but I think it is because she loves it. Tomorrow we're taking pics of the feet to compare to a yr ago at her original vetting. Her back and ovaries seem okay (on Depo), but she does not react to hoof testers. A bit of a mystery, but maybe comparing rads to the baseline will help. Any one heard of this kind of thing, and if so, how did you fix it?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 28, 2005
    Posts
    348

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    My 22 yr old DWB Jumper was diagnosed with this in his RF this past year. He has a VERY flat foot and coffin joint injections really helped. We compared his Xrays to 5 yrs before and 2 years before and due to great shoeing from his farrier he has been sound on it for years. He also receives the Adequan series 2 x a year. We no longer jump him either.
    The key is to keep any inflammation from happening in the coffin joint at all. The inflammatory processes is what cause the damage. Good balanced shoeing is also a must. I have also added Previcox (1/4 of a tablet once a day for 10 days on & 10 days off).



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2007
    Location
    Arizona
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    888

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    My older mare was diagnosed with it after X-Ray's showed calcification in the coffin joint. She had fairly flat feet and at the time was mostly retired so it wasn't due to hard work. It is sometimes called "road founder" and her symptoms were very much like a founder episode, hence the X-rays. The advise Jacqui gave is spot on. I think you are smart to X-ray the feet and it's great you have comparison pics.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep. 20, 2007
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    364

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    My friends horse was diagnosed with pedal osteitis this summer. Apparently, she had always had "not great feet", not able to go barefoot even when out of work, etc. The intermittent soreness was becoming less intermittent, and was very clearly becoming a problem right after shoeing. So she had the rads done, got the diagnosis. The farrier added a Vettech equithane (yellow, whatever softness that is) pour in pad (so just the material, no leather or plastic over) and voila, sound mare!



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
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    430

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    Thank you sooo much everyone, for sharing your experiences. Vet coming today-



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec. 2, 2003
    Posts
    277

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    In addition to vet exam with xrays, your friend and his/her vet should carefully assess the farrier work. The fact that mare is sore right after reshoeing suggests there may be issue there.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 30, 2006
    Location
    Little Rhody
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    3,464

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by JLR1 View Post
    My older mare was diagnosed with it after X-Ray's showed calcification in the coffin joint.
    Calcification of the coffin joint is aka as ringbone, not pedal osteitis.

    Pedal osteitis is demimineralization/remodeling of the coffin bone (PIII) usually caused by repeated trauma to the toe area, inadequate sole depth, poor circulation or infection. The damage is very easy to see on a radiograph. Once bone is lost, it doesn't grow back. Loads of articles on the web.

    OP, pedal osteitis is unlikely if your horse is unresponsive to hoof testers unless the damage is old, assuming of course, the farrier used them correctly. Can't hurt to get x-rays though.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 8, 2002
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    9,371

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcloisonne View Post
    OP, pedal osteitis is unlikely if your horse is unresponsive to hoof testers unless the damage is old
    My guy was diagnosed with Pedal Osteitis with rads and a bone scan, but was never responsive to hoof testers. :/ He was pretty hard to diagnose, even with the radiographs.
    "smile a lot can let us ride happy,it is good thing"

    My CANTER blog.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2007
    Location
    Landrum, SC
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    1,735

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    Since your mare moves forward willingly on the longe but resists when you're aboard, I'm thinking your saddle fit may be more of an issue than her feet. Trimming the soles a bit too much (with knife or rasp) can certainly cause a horse to be "ouchy" after shoeing, but what you're describing sounds more like she doesn't want to move under your weight in the tack. Easy test: try another saddle, or better yet - ride bareback if it's safe.
    Athletic Horses. Educated Riders.
    www.Ride-With-Confidence.com



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 20, 2011
    Posts
    430

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    Got rads and did the saddle test.. passed with flying colors. Just rump high, strung out again. Patience and flat work were prescribed. Thank you for all of the interesting comments. I had a bone scan a yr ago when she bruised a hind coffin bone. Nothing but the foot lit up then. I just want to be sure that I am no causing a problem nor that I am missing something.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Jul. 25, 2007
    Location
    Arizona
    Posts
    888

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcloisonne View Post
    Calcification of the coffin joint is aka as ringbone, not pedal osteitis.

    Pedal osteitis is demimineralization/remodeling of the coffin bone (PIII) usually caused by repeated trauma to the toe area, inadequate sole depth, poor circulation or infection. The damage is very easy to see on a radiograph. Once bone is lost, it doesn't grow back. Loads of articles on the web.

    OP, pedal osteitis is unlikely if your horse is unresponsive to hoof testers unless the damage is old, assuming of course, the farrier used them correctly. Can't hurt to get x-rays though.
    My bad...it was a typo and meant to say coffin bone.



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