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  1. #41
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    34

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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    FWIW, Licking a stall isn't a habit. Your mare either needs a salt block if she doesn't have one or she has a serious nutritional deficit that needs to be addressed.
    She already has a salt block that she loves and we've addressed it with our vet, who said there wasn't anything wrong with her. She never licked anything before being next to that horse, who also licked everything constantly despite not having anything medically wrong and having a salt block provided. I guess I can just chalk it up to an odd coincidence! Most importantly, it seems like OP has nothing to worry about



  2. #42
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Posts
    527

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    Oh I'm sure the show environment/stress had something to do with it. But this horse had been showing for 9 years before he met the cribbing neighbor. He came home from that show cribbing when he never came home from any other show cribbing. I guess he falls into the 1% that learn by seeing.



  3. #43
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2013
    Posts
    1,369

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    I once boarded at a place where most of the horses belonged to the BO, only a couple other boarders. The BO bought a horse that cribbed and stalled him where my mare could see him. My mare was on stall rest at the time and I asked that the cribber be moved just in case she got bored enough to start. It wasn't worth the risk to me.



  4. #44
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2006
    Location
    Central Illinois
    Posts
    1,194

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    Quote Originally Posted by Appsolute View Post
    Hahahahah

    Accourding to Pat Parelli - horses that crib are simply "burping"

    http://www.parellinaturalhorsetraini...orse-cribbing/
    OMG, I kinda find that offensive!! I have had my 17 yr old gelding for 11 years, he has always windsucked. He has been at two different barns in the time I have had him. Why do so many people actually follow or listen to what Parelli says?? This is another example on how Parelli has NO clue....

    My horse has NEVER taught or made another horse crib or windsuck, PERIOD.

    Sorry, Parelli, but he is the picture of PERFECT health, always has been. He is an easy keeper and I ride him enough to keep him very fit and in good weight. He is never fat or thin.

    Personally, I think people blow it way out of proportion. I regret it now, but I did the collar for awhile, yes, it stopped him, BUT he was depressed, stood still in his stall, just the look in his eyes was different.

    After a month or two, I took off the collar. He might have a colic scare ONCE every two years, mostly when the weather is really changing quickly. Nothing too serious. He has a very good life and a wonderful barn. Stress really isnt an issue. I just dont think cribbing is a big deal for him, he really is the picture of health.

    For the last few years, I made a place in his stall that he can crib w/out a problem. I tie some rope around the front of his stall, so can windsuck off of the rope. I figure instead of trying to fight him on it, I will make it as safe as I can. He has two haybags in his stall, so always has hay in front of him too.

    I had the idea that cribbing was HORRIBLE when I got into horses when I was 31 yrs old. The only reason I bought him was because I had leased him for a year, ppl were gonna sell him, I liked him, so I bought him.

    If I had kept all the myths and really bad ideas on cribbing, I would have missed out on one of the best horses I have ever known.

    Dont worry about it, your horse will be fine.

    I think it is like biting fingernails or sucking your thumb, some people do it, most dont.
    Riding is NOT meant as an inside sport, GET out of that arena!!!



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Sep. 12, 2013
    Location
    Over the rainbow
    Posts
    825

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    Quote Originally Posted by normandy_shores View Post
    I appreciate the responses. My prior understanding was that many horses learn cribbing and weaving from others. I'll try not to get too worried!

    I specifically got my guy because he's so low key, easy going and simple. Luckily he's one of the BOs favorites. In the past a neighbor mare would snake her head around and try to harass him through the stall bars (which he mostly ignored), and before I even knew about it the BO was all offended on his behalf and came up with solutions.

    While I plan to keep him forever, I always have an exit strategy in mind "just in case". Right now he's quite marketable but cribbing would definitely detract from that.
    Cribbing certainly isn't something I desire in a horse, but having owned two dedicated cribbers that were otherwise truly AMAZING horses in both temperament and ability, I am happy to overlook it if the horse's pros outweigh its cons. And in 20 years of boarding in a couple different locations in the US, I have yet to find a barn that outright refuses to take a cribber.

    Collars may or may not deter a horse from trying to crib. People that are unfamiliar with cribbing usually automatically assume that because the horse wears a collar, that it won't crib at all. I wish!! Both of mine would crib even with their Miracle Collars. They weren't generally successful because of the collar, but you bet they made a great go of it until they got bored and went to their hay. My new guy figured out he could crib on his defunct automatic waterer in the back of the stall, where I can't get after him as easily. So he goes to town for a bit, and then settles down for his hay.

    Regarding the cribbing = colic fear, yes, my cribbing addict mare had two colic surgeries. HOWEVER, it was due to nephrosplenic entrapment (her large bowel flipping up and getting caught between her spleen and kidneys) both times, not because of gas colic/cribbing.

    I think you and your guy are going to be totally fine. Enjoy your horse and stop fretting about the other one. If it bothers you THAT much, talk to the BM and see if you can switch stalls with someone else. Personally I think it's a complete non-issue.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #46
    Join Date
    Nov. 10, 2002
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    1,163

    Default Depends on the horse

    I watched my 11 yr old gelding learn how to crib. Short term boarding situation where a little girl boarded a camp horse at our barn. She loved to tie her mare near my horse. Mare was a die hard cribber. I literally watched Sky watch the mare, mimic her behavior and then crib from there on out whenever he was in his stall. It was controlled by a cribbing collar. If he was out in pasture, never saw him crib.

    For Sky it was a matter or boredom and not enough turnout. Now that he's in pasture board 24/7, I never see him crib.

    I'm a firm believer that yes, it can be learned, and that yes, it can be an inherient trait. I've actually seen a foal start cribbing when it was less than 12 hrs old...and no, it's dam wasn't a cribber, nor were there any other cribbers on the farm.
    A poorly fitted saddle hampers both horse and rider.
    https://www.facebook.com/Talley-Ho-Saddle-Services



  7. #47
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
    Posts
    3,586

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    I brought in a cribber as a rehab/rescue. I had never dealt with it before. I had 8 other horses at the time with a foal on the way. None, including the foal, ever picked up on the habit.
    In fact, I think some of them think it is quite an odd habit, but I have never seen anyone try it...
    agree, its hereditary.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld



  8. #48
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2008
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,886

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    There is one in the field with my horse. He was in the field with my old horse 17 years ago. None of the horses that have lived next to him all this time crib. He will crib in his stall and will crib on the water trough large portions of the day. Despite this habit, he looks good. His was brought on when he broke a leg and was on stall rest for a long time. I have never seen anyone ride him, and I couldn't pick out his owners because I don't think I have ever seen them. I don't know if not being worked has kept the habit going. It's anecdotal evidence, but he's been the only one on the farm that cribs for as long as I can remember.
    You are what you dare.



  9. #49
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
    Location
    Saco, Maine
    Posts
    4,752

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    I've had 2 TBs LEARN to crib. I've seen it with my own eyes. One started as a 9 year old whom I had had for 6 years, the other was 4 and had been with me for 2 weeks. They both started from watching gentlemen they admired. In fact, #1 taught #2. I don't give a fig if they crib, doesn't bother me one bit although when they started I was pretty ticked off. I've put straps on them and I've painted their woodwork. Turns out we are all happier without any extra drama of trying to prevent the inevitable. They crib, I feed them accordingly and hope for the best. #1 lived to be 23 and never had one single tummy ache. #2 is only 10 now but knock on wood, SO FAR feels fine.
    I suppose, if you are really freaked out about it, you could put a collar on your horse whenever he's in the company of the cribber. That way, yours would never feel the endorphin rush if he tries to do it and he'll get bored and figure out that skinning his gums on the ledge isn't all it is cracked up to be?! If you do get a collar, I've found the D.A.R.E. is the best, most fail-safe.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Aug. 2, 2004
    Location
    Whidbey Is, Wash.
    Posts
    11,403

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    They don't get an endorphin "rush," please read my earlier post. This is a myth.
    COTH's official mini-donk enabler

    "I am all for reaching out, but in some situations it needs to be done with a rolled up news paper." Alagirl



  11. #51
    Join Date
    Mar. 5, 2011
    Posts
    118

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    My mare cribs - always has! I've owned her from the time she was a yearling and she's now 17! I have an embryo transfer foal from her that is now 4 and is stabled across the aisle from her cribbing "mother". The 4 yr old has never learned the habit from watching and this filly is a bit hot and emotional. I'm truly convinced that she did not receive the "cribbing gene" from her mom so she does not crib. If she had inherited the gene, she probably would have cribbed even though her ET dam did not. Just my $.02.



  12. #52
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 2005
    Location
    BC, Canada
    Posts
    264

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    Our 23 y/o TB mare is a cribber. She has never "taught" a single one of our other horses to crib in the 20 years that we've owned her. Her son (now 6) is even her pasture mate and he hasn't picked it up.
    She doesn't wear a collar.



  13. #53
    Join Date
    Jan. 2, 2009
    Posts
    527

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    Quote Originally Posted by mtngirl View Post
    I watched my 11 yr old gelding learn how to crib. Short term boarding situation where a little girl boarded a camp horse at our barn. She loved to tie her mare near my horse. Mare was a die hard cribber. I literally watched Sky watch the mare, mimic her behavior and then crib from there on out whenever he was in his stall. It was controlled by a cribbing collar. If he was out in pasture, never saw him crib.

    For Sky it was a matter or boredom and not enough turnout. Now that he's in pasture board 24/7, I never see him crib.

    I'm a firm believer that yes, it can be learned, and that yes, it can be an inherient trait. I've actually seen a foal start cribbing when it was less than 12 hrs old...and no, it's dam wasn't a cribber, nor were there any other cribbers on the farm.
    I'm glad that I'm not the only person to write in here that their horse learned this trait from watching another horse.



  14. #54
    Join Date
    May. 17, 2009
    Location
    Montreal
    Posts
    46

    Default Add another to the 1%

    My 8 year old gelding started cribbing last winter: shared a fence line with a die-hard cribber, and hay was sometimes lacking in his paddock. He only goes out in electric paddocks now and has hay in front of him 24/7. I did not believe it was a learned behavior until I watched my own figure it out. Maybe 1% of the horses are smarter than the other 99%.



  15. #55
    Join Date
    Feb. 14, 2008
    Posts
    326

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    Quote Originally Posted by petit cheval brun View Post
    My 8 year old gelding started cribbing last winter: shared a fence line with a die-hard cribber, and hay was sometimes lacking in his paddock. He only goes out in electric paddocks now and has hay in front of him 24/7. I did not believe it was a learned behavior until I watched my own figure it out. Maybe 1% of the horses are smarter than the other 99%.
    They can learn if they are already genetically predisposed.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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