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  1. #1241
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    Quote Originally Posted by betonbill View Post
    Note: The perennial peanut hay they are feeding is supposed to be roughly equivalent nutrition wise to alfalfa, which is horrendously expensive here in Florida. The tiny leaves probably would be easier for some of the old guys to chew, and as long as it is baled at the right time when the leaves are in a good state, it would be just fine.
    Re: Perennial peanut hay. It comes in bales and in pellets. One of the biggest suppliers is my childhood friend, Sue Haupt Tebeaux. You can go to http://tbofarm.com to find out all about peanut hay. My horses eat it. It's 8$ a bale here in coastal GA. In FL, it will of course be more expensive because of transportation, but then I am told by my FL friends that coastal is also expensive down there also as most of coastal comes from GA as well as the peanut hay. It's good hay, although not as good as the alfalfa I buy from Seminole's supplier.


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  2. #1242
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    Jun. 30, 2006
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    SF Bay Area, California
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    Default For MC Caretaker:

    I think it's great you take time to read new posts and put together very thoughtful answers to questions. If you don't mind, I have a few more:

    Quote Originally Posted by MCF Caretaker View Post
    All advice and help will be taken and implemented the best I can.
    With the help of COTH members that are willing, I personally hope to become more knowledgeable and do what needs to be done.
    Are you close to Peter Gregory? It appears your heart is in the right place, but as a temporary employee, are you part of the decision making inner circle?

    Do you have the authority to take advice and implement it? Again, you do come across as a person who truly cares and wants to see changes for the better, but if the people in charge are not open to it, it merely becomes good intentions. I would be curious as to how willing Peter will be in listening to an all things horses newbie.


    Quote Originally Posted by MCF Caretaker View Post
    As for the future and my goals for MC, I am wanting to step up to the plate and take on the farm when the time comes.
    I admire your enthusiasm and goal. How realistic is this? Have you already spoken with Peter and the Board and been identified as a potential candidate?

    If you really want to learn how to run a care facility for senior horses, you should find a place where people know what they are doing, and volunteer there to see and learn how it is properly done.

    One last note. Lynwood mentioned that Max is supposed to be getting supplements and that someone is not only paying for his supplements but sending $50 to "sponsor" Max. Can you please post a picture of the supplement room? Do you know what the extra $50 dollars gets Max or is it merely a way for MCF to gain an extra $600 a year?
    Proud owner of a Slaughter-Bound TB from a feedlot, and her surprise baby...!
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e350/Jen4USC/fave.jpg
    http://i42.photobucket.com/albums/e3...SC/running.jpg


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  3. #1243
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    Aug. 5, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by Coanteen View Post
    Ok, really now? I have yet to see a scale in any of the feed rooms at any of the barns I've boarded, and none of the horses at those were too thin.
    This is what I mean about pointless tiny-nonissue nitpicking. Does anyone believe that the horses at MC are too thin because staff don't have the feed portion measured down to the gram?
    I buy hay by the ton. It comes in bales and my dealer's scale tells me the weight of each bale...
    If I count the flakes per bale I am fairly accurate as to how many pounds of hay each horse is getting; at least I know whether they are getting 5 pounds a day or closer to 25.

    This is not rocket science, but if a caretaker doesn't know how much a horse needs to have and of what sort of feed, hay, supplement, then they cannot know that a fed horse can still be starving and losing weight.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  4. #1244
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    Aug. 9, 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by ReSomething View Post
    Ah. Link here says much the same http://www.perennialpeanuthay.org/do...rsesgonuts.pdf . Is it available in pellets or chaff for soaking?
    Yes it is available in pellets, 50 pound bags. See http://tbofarm.com for details and a video.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #1245
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    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
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    Quote Originally Posted by cloudyandcallie View Post
    Yes it is available in pellets, 50 pound bags. See http://tbofarm.com for details and a video.
    I did not know that thanks C&C learned something new !
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #1246
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    12 x 365 x 135 = 591,300 not 200,000

    200K is about $4 per horse per day.

    The 2010 - CORRECTION 2011- [most recent, available on Guidestar] 990 states
    'feed & hay' $86,663.

    http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocument...089e7d8c-9.pdf

    2010 'feed & hay' was $95,466

    http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocument...078e48b7-9.pdf

    2009 'feed & hay' $68,102
    http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocument...066f2879-Z.pdf
    Last edited by Angela Freda; Nov. 7, 2013 at 05:11 PM.
    Yo/Yousolong April 23rd, 1985- April 15th, 2014

    http://notesfromadogwalker.com/2012/...m-a-sanctuary/



  7. #1247
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  8. #1248
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    If they feel buying pelleted feed is too expensive, they could do as Dairies do and buy a tub grinder, grinding the hay or grains in that, measuring into buckets and adding water to make a gruel.

    I would think that teaming with actual farmers, their state AG department or local large scale horse farms (TB racing anyone?) for advice would be a smart move for either the owners or Caretakers.



  9. #1249
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Freda View Post
    The 2010 [most recent, available on Guidestar] 990 states
    'feed & hay' $86,663.
    Hopefully there alot fewer horses then, or they are getting donated hay and feed (non-cost); that is less than $55 per horse per month at 135 special needs horses.


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  10. #1250
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    12 x 365 x 135 = 591,300 not 200,000

    200K is about $4 per horse per day.
    According to their 2011 990 they spent $86,663 on feed and hay. Assuming they had fewer horses....according to their 2010 newsletter, they had at least 125 horses. That works out to less than $58 per month per horse. Either the numbers are wrong on their 990 or....I just don't know. They say they don't get any special deals on feed, Perhaps they hay their own fields. I just don't know.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #1251
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    Lexington, KY
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    If they feel buying pelleted feed is too expensive, they could do as Dairies do and buy a tub grinder, grinding the hay or grains in that, measuring into buckets and adding water to make a gruel.

    I would think that teaming with actual farmers, their state AG department or local large scale horse farms (TB racing anyone?) for advice would be a smart move for either the owners or Caretakers.
    Most feed suppliers will cut a very special deal to a rescue. You just have to ask. If the directors or their volunteers don't know how how to get in kind donations, well, they're not attracting the right kind of volunteer. It always goes back to the top dog.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #1252
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    Feb. 15, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynnwood View Post
    We have a produce scale in the feed room. Every meal is weighed. We have the opposite problem FAT horses. Making sure that the overweight founder pron pony only gets 100 grams a meal to equal just under a 1/2lbs a day is important. I would believe that if we asked all of COTH to scoop out 100grams without a scale the variation would be drastic as would be the effect on the pony who needs precise management.

    I did suggest to Caretaker that a scale would be a great addition. If Volunteers are helping make up grain its a lot easier to write down Max eats 5lbs a feeding vs Max eats 1 /14 scoops and let them guess as to what a 1/4 is vs a 1/2 and which scoop is the right scoop.

    Is the lack of scale why they have thin horses probably not.. could it help them fix the problem yes. Becoming more active Micro Managers where each horse's condition and requirements are concerned.
    Been using a scale for years and I agree it is a helpful tool, especially when other people have to farm-sit.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  13. #1253
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    The chart for peanut hay allocates 32 pounds daily for a 1,000 pound horse...

    Very simple for a Caretaker to bring a bath scale to work, and weight themseles with / without feed in their arms to see how much the horses are getting (or eating, which is the vital part).



  14. #1254
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    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    Most feed suppliers will cut a very special deal to a rescue. You just have to ask. If the directors or their volunteers don't know how how to get in kind donations, well, they're not attracting the right kind of volunteer. It always goes back to the top dog.
    So true.



  15. #1255
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    Nov. 15, 2005
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    NY
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    32 pounds daily per horse times 130 horses is 4160 pounds a day of hay.
    29,120 a week
    116,480 a month.

    Or you could say... a whole lot of hay!
    Yo/Yousolong April 23rd, 1985- April 15th, 2014

    http://notesfromadogwalker.com/2012/...m-a-sanctuary/


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  16. #1256
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    Lexington, KY
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    That's an awful lot of hay. Usually 1 1/2 to 3 times their weight is the number used to estimate hay...that would be 15 to 30 lbs per day. That's an average of course, and I'm guessing a lot of the really old geezers can only play with the hay.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #1257
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynnwood View Post
    Your right Fairfax when I made the post I said the horse was 29 when he left our care. After 20 plus years a year got away from me.

    Max was actually 30 and I realized my mistake when I was collecting all of his legal paperwork. I just never went back and fixed it I apologize if that confused you. I fixed my error.

    Max was born in 1982. He left our facility in early fall 2012 when it closed and all the other horses left the property he arrived at Mill Creek in July of 2013
    Thank you. That makes sense



  18. #1258
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    Nov. 2, 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by D_BaldStockings View Post
    12 x 365 x 135 = 591,300 not 200,000

    200K is about $4 per horse per day.
    Oh sheesh...make it look even more bleak!

    Thanks for correcting my non-math there.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.



  19. #1259
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    Jun. 19, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Angela Freda View Post
    32 pounds daily per horse times 130 horses is 4160 pounds a day of hay.
    29,120 a week
    116,480 a month.

    Or you could say... a whole lot of hay!
    THIRTRY TWO POUNDS of hay PER DAY?

    Where did you ever get that from. Standard is a TOTAL including grain of 17 to 21 pounds...depending on breed. Arabs much less than Saddlebreds for example. Ponies way way down on the scale.

    IF one is feeding an Alfalfa hay or that type of hay you reduce it yet again.

    Example...I feed oats, 16 percent horse vitamin crunch and two small flakes of 3rd cut Alfalfa a and one flake of brome /prairie wool/fescue and I am continually having to put Saddlebred mares on a diet. Total weight is 12 pounds.



  20. #1260
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    Feb. 28, 2006
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    The rocky part of KY
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    JenM, when Mr Caretaker posted a pic of the feed room I think the supplements were on a counter on the back wall http://tinypic.com/view.php?pic=8wl0nk&s=5#.UnwEXZ0o6M8 .

    I think I see three or four bags of cat food, cat treats, some extra scoops, the white board on the wall and then some horse supplements but I don't see any supplements in the sizes I'd expect for a place that has over 100 horses.

    Mr Caretaker, for our purposes a supplement could be edible oil used as dressing to add calories or small pails of joint supplements, say about 2.5 lbs. Are there any such in the feed room or next to the area where feed is put into buckets?
    Courageous Weenie Eventer Wannabe
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