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  1. #21
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    Feb. 8, 2006
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    Quote Originally Posted by GucciJumper View Post
    Just playing devils advocate here, but what do you expect to do if the family absolutely cannot afford a pet because of its problems. Some vets won't put down "healthy" animals who happen to have problems. Just curious what you think a family should do then?
    When I was in that situation, I called animal control and told them i had an old, sick cat that needed to be euthed because I just couldnt afford 70-100 a month to keep her healthy and that I was completely broke and she was hurting and could they put her to sleep for me so she wouldn't hurt any more. They told me to bring her in when I could and they would take care of it.


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  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    In the end, we had a very long convo along the lines of "better a day too soon than a moment too late" and about how stressful it can be on cats to change environments, as well as the likelihood of the cat actually being adopted rather than euth'd at a shelter given the expense and condition of the kitty and wouldn't she rather be there at the end rather than worrying that kitty died in a shelter....

    The caller was not a client of ours, admitted that she'd called at least 20 places already today and no one had really talked through all of that with her, that she appreciated it, etc. But I was honestly a bit worried I would terribly offend her with that truth and logic.
    Thank you very much for taking the time with this caller, OP.

    People are f'cken idiots about this stuff because of what you discovered: The whole topic is just.so.taboo that no one gets a chance to practice thinking and feeling their way through this decision. So the wheel gets reinvented over and over, often badly and usually in secret.

    That's what I appreciate about being in Horse World. We have a much richer vocabulary and culture to support us in euthanasia decisions. IMHO, many terminally-ill people would suffer less if what we know in Horse World were spread around a little more widely.

    My initial response is to summarily rip the person's head out of their a$$ and rant about how lame it is that they put it all the way up there.

    And then I remember that no one taught them otherwise. I realize *that* might be the special (and better) contribution I can make to the situation.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by SarEQ View Post
    We told DS about the vet helping his hedgehog die because she was old and sick and hurting and couldn't be fixed. He was very sad and misses her very much, but I don't think he hates or blames us and he's three.
    A boy and his beloved hedgehog girl! I'm all misty eyed.

    I think you are right to want parents to Man Up and tell the truth. IMO (again), kids should be taught about euthanasia with pets-- in an age-appropriate way. The point is to teach them that:

    1. Death happens, no matter what.
    2. There are better and worse ways to die; a "good death" is the literal meaning of euthanasia.
    3. It's great that we have the option of providing better... when the "worse" option in terms of death can be pretty bad.
    4. IMO, animals and pets present a low-stakes opportunity to practice figuring out one's feelings and commitments.

    To me, that's not because animals don't suffer as intensely as humans; they do. It's because I don't think they can know that we-- people they trust-- can and do discuss killing them. That factor is the big one that separates people from animals and makes the human version the much, much bigger deal.

    So, bottom line, if you make the first time you have to consider being part of some form of euthanasia-- maybe supporting your parents' decision to use his/her DNR order-- it's going to be harder than if you had already walked through some version of a euthanasia decision with an animal. And if that high-stakes human decision is hard and the first one you make, chances are that you won't do it particularly well. No one wants that to happen.
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  4. #24
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    I have an (ex) friend that got a cocker spaniel as a puppy. The dog was lovely and sweet and my friend adored her for almost 10 years.

    Until she had a baby, and then another, and they bought a new house.....

    The new house did not have a fenced yard, and with the babies she couldn't possibly find the time to walk the dog. So they gave her away. I can't even begin to tell you how much this pissed me off. I'm sure the dog was heartbroken.

    And THEN, when her kids were both under 5, she decided to "adopt" a kitten. The vet kindly included a year long health package for the bargain price of $900!

    It was a tiny kitten and was terrified of the 2 toddlers who thought it was fun to chase. Apparently that was too much work also, because she (thankfully) gave the kitten away too.

    I seriously will never understand people!



  5. #25
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    Apr. 6, 2006
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    I have an (ex) friend that got a cocker spaniel as a puppy. The dog was lovely and sweet and my friend adored her for almost 10 years.

    Until she had a baby, and then another, and they bought a new house.....

    The new house did not have a fenced yard, and with the babies she couldn't possibly find the time to walk the dog. So they gave her away. I can't even begin to tell you how much this pissed me off. I'm sure the dog was heartbroken.

    And THEN, when her kids were both under 5, she decided to "adopt" a kitten. The vet kindly included a year long health package for the bargain price of $900!

    It was a tiny kitten and was terrified of the 2 toddlers who thought it was fun to chase. Apparently that was too much work also, because she (thankfully) gave the kitten away too.

    I seriously will never understand people!


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  6. #26
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    Nov. 18, 2004
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    Being a seriously irresponsible animal owner is just about the fastest way to become my ex-friend.
    I tolerate all kinds of animal idiosyncrasies.
    I've found that I don't tolerate people idiosyncrasies as well. - Casey09



    12 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    Mar. 27, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    yeah, I had to quit working at a shelter. It was either that or murder someone.
    The worst, though, was the time I met a friend's neighbor (now ex-neighbor)- they bought a puppy every year from a pet store, then took it to a really nasty high-kill shelter to be gassed when it hit about 8 months old. I was standing there aghast as the guy explained "we like puppies but not dogs" and didn't even seem to care their "beloved" pet every year spent a week in terror and then died horribly.
    Every single year, year after year. I wonder what the kids learned from this and how they turned out.
    Holy carp, that's evil. I can't stand puppies - well I can, but my favorite age is 5-6 weeks before they go crazy. I like to play with them for an hour and then leave them with the breeder.

    Anyway, we were talking about the subject of euthanasia and the old "tell your kids the dog went to live on a farm" lie, when my MiL pipes up and says her dog really did go to live on a farm. Then she got a look on her face and got real quiet.
    So that was kind of awkward.
    You are what you dare.



  8. #28
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    Sep. 28, 2013
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    QC, Canada
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    It is hard to make that decision, but agreed, if your cat won't take has a condition, hard to medicate, pees and poop all over the house... Think about how many healthy adult cats get euthed in shelters for lack of homes, your kitty isn't a golden candidate here...

    Pet donations, that's a funny term, like clinics are in dire need of more sick pets or clinic cats!

    A few years ago, someone ran into work, dropped a carrier in between two doors, and left running - surprise! Pregnant cat, we had to place her 8 kittens and a coworker took mom.

    One spring, I came to work one morning and there was a carrier wrapped in a garbage on the steps outside. Thankfully the 2 kittens were not there for long otherwise they'd have frozen to death.

    Obviously it ended well for them, but no kudos to the anonymous people that left them on our doorstep. You need to move, you're allergic, you can't support a pet anymore? Own up to it, find him a home, put him on petfinder, bring him to the shelter... But don't just dump him like garbage!



  9. #29
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    Apr. 28, 2008
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    People are always dumping cats on my farm. Just this morning I found a huge hungry tabby cat staring at me from my back yard. They can tell a sucker from a mile away. I have "will feed hungry cats" written all over me, apparently.

    Poor thing....he is scared and hungry but obviously humanized. I got about five feet away from him but he didn't want me to touch him today. In a day or two I bet he will either move on or be in my lap. He ate a remarkable amount, poor fellow.

    I hate people. This poor kitty doesn't deserve whatever he has gone through the last few days.


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  10. #30
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    Sep. 27, 2000
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lori B View Post
    Being a seriously irresponsible animal owner is just about the fastest way to become my ex-friend.
    This is probably part of my gripe with a co-worker. I was telling another co-worker about a litter of kittens that had been born at the barn when she jumped in and said she wanted a kitten. She didn't seem like the animal type and her daughter was a bit young, but I talked to her about basic cat care. Her daughter was good with the kitten/cat, the cat was great with the kid and they did all the vet stuff. And then one day they wanted to leave town for a couple of months and gave the cat away to a neighbor without a second thought. It probably ended well as the neighbor had taken care of the cat and adored her. But, it still rubbed me the wrong way that they would just give up on an animal so easily.

    On a cheerier note, a FB friend who is involved in cat rescue posted about a surrendered 14 y.o. cat who was in a shelter near me, I reposted, and, lo and behold, a friend went and adopted the cat and adores her.
    The Evil Chem Prof


    5 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Jul. 13, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by paulaedwina View Post
    The worst story I was ever privy to was from a friend of a friend who told me that when her chow got pregnant again she had her son take it out to the woods and leave it. She must have seen the shock on my face because she said, "What was I supposed to do?"I was speechless. This had happened some time in the past.Paula
    There's something about the phrase "What was I supposed to do?" - it always seems to be used when the person speaking knows very well what they were supposed to do. Poor dog.


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  12. #32
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    Mar. 27, 2008
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    ^OMG I missed this one. WTF is wrong with people!?
    If this happened like 20 years ago, I'd say we found that poor Chow still carrying dead puppies and loaded with green pus. When I picked up her tail to take her temp, a cup of maggots fell out. A couple of the techs puked and few of us screamed. That poor dog somehow managed to survive. Some people really suck.
    You are what you dare.



  13. #33
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    Nov. 1, 2012
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    Hmm, the euthing of ‘healthy’ animals is a curly one. Our Grumpy Old Lady Cat had some ongoing health issues. 18mths of issues, tests, scans, visits to the best small animal specialists etc could not give us a diagnosis. We knew it was the end when we tried her on a high dose painkiller for a weekend – she was back to being friendly and purry. Poor kitty was obviously in a lot of pain, was getting stressed out going to the vets all the time, and even if a firm diagnosis was possible there was no guarantee that there would be any kind of ‘fix’.

    I phoned the vet to say that we’d come to the end. She questioned the decision, though I’d bought it up in the last few consultations. Vet did concede the point, finally. She’s a lovely lady, but I think she’s still at that fairly idealistic stage.

    So if these people were dealing with a vet like this it may have influenced their thinking. Our vet just kept offering us up more things to try, she never bought up euth.



    Quite a few years ago I went a bit OTT with a guy at my old work when he said that his cat had had kittens and was pregnant again. I had a big rant about how the SPCA is flooded with animals and has to put down healthy older cats and dogs because of all the irresponsible people letting their animals breed. (I didn’t yell or get angry, but it wasn’t really professional!) Amazingly he took it on board, they got the cat spayed and he actually thanked me for saying something.


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  14. #34
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    Aug. 12, 2010
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    Westford, Massachusetts
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    Quote Originally Posted by Feliz View Post
    I phoned the vet to say that we’d come to the end. She questioned the decision, though I’d bought it up in the last few consultations. Vet did concede the point, finally. She’s a lovely lady, but I think she’s still at that fairly idealistic stage.

    So if these people were dealing with a vet like this it may have influenced their thinking. Our vet just kept offering us up more things to try, she never bought up euth.
    Ugh. A really great vet looks at the whole picture, including the owner's financial and emotional state, as well as a realistic assessment of the animal's quality of life. Our practice has three vets and there are two I'd go to in a tough spot to support my hard decision. I really feel for the less experienced, or less objective, pet owners who might get accidently hooked up with a young/less experienced/more idealistic vet...a recipe for decisions far harder than they should be. One reason I pick the mixed practice in town, that serves the local farms and large animals and not a strictly pet practice, you'll get some vets with a common sense perspective when they are working with folks for whom animals are their living and not just family members.


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  15. #35
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    How people can have such an extreme lack of empathy is just way, way beyond me!!
    www.svhanoverians.com

    "Simple: Breeding,Training, Riding". Wolfram Wittig.


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  16. #36
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    Sep. 20, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canaqua View Post
    Ugh. A really great vet looks at the whole picture, including the owner's financial and emotional state, as well as a realistic assessment of the animal's quality of life. Our practice has three vets and there are two I'd go to in a tough spot to support my hard decision. I really feel for the less experienced, or less objective, pet owners who might get accidently hooked up with a young/less experienced/more idealistic vet...a recipe for decisions far harder than they should be. One reason I pick the mixed practice in town, that serves the local farms and large animals and not a strictly pet practice, you'll get some vets with a common sense perspective when they are working with folks for whom animals are their living and not just family members.
    My friend with the dog with seperation anxiety is worried her vet will not be willing to euthanize if getting a buddy doesn't work out for him. She's going to discuss quality of life on Tuesday, but she may be looking for a vet just to euthanize in case the experiment doesn't work out. The dog is clearly unhappy and often injured, but is "healthy", so she may need to work hard to find him a good end.


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  17. #37
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    Feb. 18, 2011
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    Got this ALL the time working the pet store. We had a lady come and give us a 4-5 month old puppy ON CHRISTMAS EVE while her three children sobbed at the counter- reason? "the kids didnt walk it enough in the snow, so I;m going to teach them a lesson."

    I read this to my staff at the November store meeting every year- I wanted them to be as aware as possible that we should be making sure live animals were placed in the best home possible, not push them just to make our sales goal.
    http://www.crean.com/jimwillis/hcy.html

    When I was a puppy I entertained you with my antics and made you laugh. You called me your child and despite a number of chewed shoes and a couple of murdered throw pillows, I became your best friend. Whenever I was "bad," you'd shake your finger at me and ask "How could you?" - but then you'd relent and roll me over for a bellyrub.

    My housetraining took a little longer than expected, because you were terribly busy, but we worked on that together. I remember those nights of nuzzling you in bed, listening to your confidences and secret dreams, and I believed that life could not be any more perfect. We went for long walks and runs in the park, car rides, stops for ice cream (I only got the cone because "ice cream is bad for dogs," you said), and I took long naps in the sun waiting for you to come home at the end of the day.

    Gradually, you began spending more time at work and on your career, and more time searching for a human mate. I waited for you patiently, comforted you through heartbreaks and disappointments, never chided you about bad decisions, and romped with glee at your homecomings, and when you fell in love.

    She, now your wife, is not a "dog person" - still I welcomed her into our home, tried to show her affection, and obeyed her. I was happy because you were happy. Then the human babies came along and I shared your excitement. I was fascinated by their pinkness, how they smelled, and I wanted to mother them, too. Only she and you worried that I might hurt them, and I spent most of my time banished to another room, or to a dog crate. Oh, how I wanted to love them, but I became a "prisoner of love."

    As they began to grow, I became their friend. They clung to my fur and pulled themselves up on wobbly legs, poked fingers in my eyes, investigated my ears and gave me kisses on my nose. I loved everything about them, especially their touch - because your touch was now so infrequent - and I would have defended them with my life if need be.

    I would sneak into their beds and listen to their worries and secret dreams. Together we waited for the sound of your car in the driveway. There had been a time, when others asked you if you had a dog, that you produced a photo of me from your wallet and told them stories about me. These past few years, you just answered "yes" and changed the subject. I had gone from being your dog to "just a dog," and you resented every expenditure on my behalf.

    Now you have a new career opportunity in another city and you and they will be moving to an apartment that does not allow pets. You've made the right decision for your "family," but there was a time when I was your only family.

    I was excited about the car ride until we arrived at the animal shelter. It smelled of dogs and cats, of fear, of hopelessness. You filled out the paperwork and said "I know you will find a good home for her." They shrugged and gave you a pained look. They understand the realities facing a middle-aged dog or cat, even one with "papers."

    You had to pry your son's fingers loose from my collar as he screamed "No, Daddy! Please don't let them take my dog!" And I worried for him and what lessons you had just taught him about friendship and loyalty, about love and responsibility, and about respect for all life. You gave me a goodbye pat on the head, avoided my eyes, and politely refused to take my collar and leash with you. You had a deadline to meet and now I have one, too.

    After you left, the two nice ladies said you probably knew about your upcoming move months ago and made no attempt to find me another good home. They shook their heads and asked "How could you?"

    They are as attentive to us here in the shelter as their busy schedules allow. They feed us, of course, but I lost my appetite days ago. At first, whenever anyone passed my pen, I rushed to the front, hoping it was you - that you had changed your mind - that this was all a bad dream...or I hoped it would at least be someone who cared, anyone who might save me. When I realized I could not compete with the frolicking for attention of happy puppies, oblivious to their own fate, I retreated to a far corner and waited.

    I heard her footsteps as she came for me at the end of the day and I padded along the aisle after her to a separate room. A blissfully quiet room. She placed me on the table, rubbed my ears and told me not to worry. My heart pounded in anticipation of what was to come, but there was also a sense of relief. The prisoner of love had run out of days. As is my nature, I was more concerned about her. The burden which she bears weighs heavily on her and I know that, the same way I knew your every mood.

    She gently placed a tourniquet around my foreleg as a tear ran down her cheek. I licked her hand in the same way I used to comfort you so many years ago. She expertly slid the hypodermic needle into my vein. As I felt the sting and the cool liquid coursing through my body, I lay down sleepily, looked into her kind eyes and murmured "How could you?"

    Perhaps because she understood my dogspeak, she said "I'm so sorry." She hugged me and hurriedly explained it was her job to make sure I went to a better place, where I wouldn't be ignored or abused or abandoned, or have to fend for myself - a place of love and light so very different from this earthly place. With my last bit of energy, I tried to convey to her with a thump of my tail that my "How could you?" was not meant for her. It was you, My Beloved Master, I was thinking of. I will think of you and wait for you forever.

    May everyone in your life continue to show you so much loyalty.
    ~Former Pet Store Manager (10yrs)
    ~Vintage Toy Dealer (rememberswhen.us)
    Mom to : 1 Horse, 4 Dogs, 4 Cats, 1 Macaw, 6 (Former) Stepkids



  18. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by PaintPony View Post
    I have an (ex) friend that got a cocker spaniel as a puppy. The dog was lovely and sweet and my friend adored her for almost 10 years.

    Until she had a baby, and then another, and they bought a new house.....

    The new house did not have a fenced yard, and with the babies she couldn't possibly find the time to walk the dog. So they gave her away. I can't even begin to tell you how much this pissed me off. I'm sure the dog was heartbroken.

    And THEN, when her kids were both under 5, she decided to "adopt" a kitten. The vet kindly included a year long health package for the bargain price of $900!

    It was a tiny kitten and was terrified of the 2 toddlers who thought it was fun to chase. Apparently that was too much work also, because she (thankfully) gave the kitten away too.

    I seriously will never understand people!
    I am sure the dog was heartbroken. I adopted a 14 year old cocker over a year ago. Her owner had Alzheimer's and had to be placed in a memory unit. My poor Bonnie was very depressed for about 6 months. She's since perked up and is the happy little dog she must have been with her previous owner, but it was heartbreaking for me to watch.

    Fortunately, for Bonnie, she found a soft place to land, but her previous owner's daughter was very careful to make sure that she would be well taken care of. (The daughter had been in a serious car accident and was still in a wheel chair when I adopted Bonnie.)
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  19. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by BuddyRoo View Post
    I mean "donated".
    As if their animals have value-- like the money you gave to a charity.

    What's the tax-deduction on a cat? Does the IRS have some kind of table for that?
    The armchair saddler
    Politically Pro-Cat


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  20. #40
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    The dog is clearly unhappy and often injured, but is "healthy", so she may need to work hard to find him a good end.
    mentally ill= just as unhealthy as physically ill. Often mental illness is more distressing for both animal and owner than physical illness.



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