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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    921

    Default Thank you kind neighbors NOT!

    I live on a county road. Horse broke his halter and fell down. Saddled, muddy, and I am limping after him because I got stepped on in the process. Runs up to the road and several cars ride by, slowly once they see him thank goodness, but not a one stops to ask if I need help.

    I would have more than likely said no thank you but at least they could have asked.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar. 9, 2006
    Posts
    2,692

    Default

    Welcome to America.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb. 8, 2007
    Location
    Alabama
    Posts
    1,473

    Default

    People are so clueless about horses and how it all works that they probably thought you were out taking him for a walk.


    17 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,749

    Default

    That sucks.
    If it restores your faith in humanity, I was walking my horse down a road a couple months ago -- just leading her, nothing wrong (but it was howling windy and she was really nervous, and not a wide shoulder, so I hopped off and led her rather than have her dancing around.) All the cars that passed slowed down and gave me wide berth, and twice a driver rolled down the window and asked if I needed anything. There are still some good eggs out there.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    19 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,749

    Default

    whoops double post
    Last edited by HungarianHippo; Nov. 26, 2014 at 07:34 PM.
    Try to break down crushing defeats into smaller, more manageable failures. It’s also helpful every now and then to stop, take stock of your situation, and really beat yourself up about it.The Onion


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 1999
    Location
    Shangri-LA
    Posts
    2,136

    Default

    Sadly it would be the same if that happened where I live, though they would have honked and gunned the engines of their cars in hopes of spooking the horse (that actually did happen to a neighbor who was out riding with a friend).
    "My treasures do not chink or gleam, they glitter in the sun and neigh at night."
    ~Gypsy saying


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2009
    Posts
    681

    Default

    Luseride, are you and the horse OK?

    Rebecca


    2 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2010
    Location
    Somewhere in SW ON
    Posts
    302

    Default

    Aww I'm sorry to hear this. I totally would have helped. I, too, live in the country and carry an extra dog leash (and I don't have a dog lol) and lead rope in my car. I also give wide berths to anyone walking on the side of our roads and to the horse and buggies. I'm also the person who has a trough at the end of the drive for the horses going by.

    Hugs. Still lots of good peeps out there! Are you and your horse ok?


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2013
    Location
    Washington State
    Posts
    1,060

    Default

    Don't lose faith. My neighbors have come to get me when a gate was left open and the horses were cavorting. Another time a different neighbor put them back in for me and then called to fyi me.

    Those are the only times they have ever gotten out and both had good people help out.

    Google Image "Faith in humanity restored" for some good vibes.
    My herd for life:
    King: 20 year old Foxtrotter gelding
    Ruais: 7 year old Friesian/Arabian mare
    http://imgur.com/a/LSPiJ#0


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,875

    Default

    That would never happen here.

    Where do you live, OP?
    “Most people do not listen with the intent to understand; they listen with the intent to reply.” Stephen R. Covey



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 27, 2008
    Posts
    2,687

    Default

    The last time I fell off my (previous) horse -- which, thank God was quite a long time ago -- I was on my own property but within view of the road, and a passerby pulled his car over and called to me asking if I was OK.

    The funny thing was I immediately said, "Oh sure. I'm fine." I had no idea if I was fine. I could have been totally incapacitated for all I knew. But I waved him off without a thought.

    LOL. Fortunately, I was OK.
    I have a Fjord! Life With Oden


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jun. 23, 2007
    Posts
    415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Luseride View Post
    I live on a county road. Horse broke his halter and fell down. Saddled, muddy, and I am limping after him because I got stepped on in the process. Runs up to the road and several cars ride by, slowly once they see him thank goodness, but not a one stops to ask if I need help.

    I would have more than likely said no thank you but at least they could have asked.
    I'm sorry to hear of your bad experience. I'm sorry you don't have neighbors like mine, who, even though they know nothing about horses and weren't helpful, at least tried to help. They had no idea how to stop the horses running down the road and were intimidated by them and kept backing up but at least they tried. The next neighbor down the road is a horse person and came out and grabbed a mare, which effectively stopped the herd until I could get there and get halters on the mares. I should've accepted her offer to help me lead them back to the barn but I was still a bit dazed after hitting my face on the ground. All worked out though! I'm glad you and your horse survived the ordeal!!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 29, 2007
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    184

    Default

    On the flip side......I was driving down the road not far from my house and saw a loose horse grazing along the side of the road. It was across the road from a boarding barn where I routinely see loose dogs, pigs, goats, etc in the front yard. Another car coming in the opposite direction also saw it and we both stopped to hold up traffic (not a very busy road). A car came out of the drive from the barn and I thought surely they were coming to fetch the horse. No, they just waved and turned onto the road and kept going. So I get out of my car with the only thing I had available - a dog leash. Then I see a person calmly sauntering down the driveway with a bucket. In no particular hurry and WITHOUT ANY SORT OF HALTER OR LEAD. She apparently thought pony would come nickering towards her once he saw the bucket and follow her back down the drive. No, pony was having way too much fun there by the road. So I threw her my leash and, after walking after him for a bit as he weighed his options (Food? Freedom?) she was able to loop the leash around his neck and lead him back to the barn. I followed to get my leash back which she threw to me without so much as a Thank You Ma'am.

    Oh well.....still glad I stopped.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,900

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    That would never happen here.

    ?
    nor here, hasn't rained much in six or seven years so no mud

    We did have a friend of one of our daughters fall off one of our horses while riding the levee system here... horse turned around and trotted home... with two police cars following to make sure she was OK.

    The officers commented that she appears to know where she was going and never broke any laws, even used the cross walks to cross the streets and highways... the divided four lane highway didn't phase her as they said she stopped looked both directions before stepping onto the roadway... after walking across the street they said she went back trotting home.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    5,188

    Default

    I can see the exact thing happening here, except they wouldn't slow down. We are in an area of 5 acre plots and few horses, so lots of minivans and pickup trucks and the only one that ever slows down for me if I venture out on the road with a horse is my favorite UPS driver. He would definitely stop to help if a horse was loose, but he's a good guy and has horses in the family. My neighbors...they'd plow through a herd of horses if they had to as nothing interferes with them getting to the bus stop for the kiddies. Nothing. They drive off the road and tear up the grass right of way rather than wait 5 minutes for the garbage truck. So a loose horse...not their problem.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2007
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    797

    Default

    I think if my non horsey neighbors saw I was following a loose horse, covered in mud, but otherwise looked fine and mobile, they would likely think that I was probably not much in a visiting mood and would continue on their way.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RMJacobs View Post
    Luseride, are you and the horse OK?

    Rebecca
    Yes. we are fine. I was worried about him as he is my old man but after watching him trot around back and forth I knew he was fine.

    I have no idea why he has started pulling back this year. He is 21 and I put it down to old man syndrome. We go ages without it so it always surprises me.

    Thank you for asking.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SlabSided View Post
    On the flip side......I was driving down the road not far from my house and saw a loose horse grazing along the side of the road. It was across the road from a boarding barn where I routinely see loose dogs, pigs, goats, etc in the front yard. Another car coming in the opposite direction also saw it and we both stopped to hold up traffic (not a very busy road). A car came out of the drive from the barn and I thought surely they were coming to fetch the horse. No, they just waved and turned onto the road and kept going. So I get out of my car with the only thing I had available - a dog leash. Then I see a person calmly sauntering down the driveway with a bucket. In no particular hurry and WITHOUT ANY SORT OF HALTER OR LEAD. She apparently thought pony would come nickering towards her once he saw the bucket and follow her back down the drive. No, pony was having way too much fun there by the road. So I threw her my leash and, after walking after him for a bit as he weighed his options (Food? Freedom?) she was able to loop the leash around his neck and lead him back to the barn. I followed to get my leash back which she threw to me without so much as a Thank You Ma'am.

    Oh well.....still glad I stopped.
    You are the kind of neighbor I would love to have.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyg View Post
    The last time I fell off my (previous) horse -- which, thank God was quite a long time ago -- I was on my own property but within view of the road, and a passerby pulled his car over and called to me asking if I was OK.

    The funny thing was I immediately said, "Oh sure. I'm fine." I had no idea if I was fine. I could have been totally incapacitated for all I knew. But I waved him off without a thought.

    LOL. Fortunately, I was OK.
    I once had a very bad concussion and my son and niece found me. They thought I was a hurt dog from the sounds I was making. I kept telling them I was fine, not to go and get my sister. Thankfully, even at five and six years old they knew better than I did and got my sister.

    I am always "fine" because I don't want anyone blaming the horses because I do something stupid.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Jun. 16, 2011
    Posts
    921

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by FourFaults View Post
    Aww I'm sorry to hear this. I totally would have helped. I, too, live in the country and carry an extra dog leash (and I don't have a dog lol) and lead rope in my car. I also give wide berths to anyone walking on the side of our roads and to the horse and buggies. I'm also the person who has a trough at the end of the drive for the horses going by.

    Hugs. Still lots of good peeps out there! Are you and your horse ok?
    We are fine. He was laughing at me by the time I caught him.


    2 members found this post helpful.

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