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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2011
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    258

    Default She's worth it, but is the feed worth it? Switching to an "expensive" feed advice!

    I'm currently feeding BS Performance Sentinel extruded pellets. She looks healthy, has beautiful dapples and a healthy coat. She is a little underweight, but we are transitioning from grass to hay, and she seems to be a bit reluctant.

    My friend fancies herself as a bit of an equine nutritionist, and has suggested I start feeding Genesis (it's an organic feed from Canada). Admittedly, all of her equine athletes look fabulous. It's about $30 per bag, and i'm currently paying just under $18. She mentioned that extruded pellets are some of the worst feeds you can give an equine. I didn't wait for the rationale, however, my vet mentioned how much she absolutely loves the BS extruded feeds!

    Our other option from the other local feed store is the Cavalor, roughly the same price, around $30 per bag.

    I'm wondering for those who are currently feeding either (or have tried both?!) what your thoughts are on this approach to equine nutrition and the less processed feeds. Did you notice a difference in the overall health of your animal? Or was it minimal? The feeding recommendation for the Genesis seems very high, and that's something I would like to move away from. I'm currently feeding 8 quarts a day by volume of the extruded feed, and it is a ton of feed. My animal weighs approximately 1000lbs--so 10lbs of feed of the Genesis a day?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    She mentioned that extruded pellets are some of the worst feeds you can give an equine. I didn't wait for the rationale, however, my vet mentioned how much she absolutely loves the BS extruded feeds!
    AWWW! I want to know her reason!

    BS Performance LS I'm assuming is what you are feeding? That is a good feed, I wouldn't be worried about staying with it. If you said you were feeding Omolene 500 I would've said switch!!! Because its high in sugar. But BS Perf LS is not, and its a great quality feed.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  3. #3
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    Jul. 28, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    AWWW! I want to know her reason!

    BS Performance LS I'm assuming is what you are feeding? That is a good feed, I wouldn't be worried about staying with it. If you said you were feeding Omolene 500 I would've said switch!!! Because its high in sugar. But BS Perf LS is not, and its a great quality feed.
    Without knowing exactly, I think because of the way it is processed. She's into a more "holistic" approach, including the no by-products of husks, pulp, etc.
    She equated it to the super market brand of dog food vs. the Blue Buffalo etc.

    I haven't been exactly dissatisfied with the BS Perf! But i'm wondering if these other options are a more healthy option for my horse. She has me second guessing my feed!



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2002
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    2,250

    Default

    I have to laugh a little. Here in the midwest, you can buy an oat-corn-soybean mix at the local mill and know that pretty much everything in it was grown within 25 miles of home. But people look down on that because it doesn't come in a fancy bag. So now you can pay three times as much for non-pelleted feed to be trucked in from someplace else and it's supposed to be better because you can see the individual oats, just like the oats that are grown by your neighbors... Truly, I get the principle that monocropped corn and soybeans are far from organic, but really...


    7 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by ISR View Post
    ...I haven't been exactly dissatisfied with the BS Perf! But i'm wondering if these other options are a more healthy option for my horse. She has me second guessing my feed!
    If its not broke....

    BS Perf LS is an excellent option
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    3 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
    Location
    NY
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    3,415

    Default

    not related to your post but WHERE are you getting BS LS Sentinel for $18??! My feed store charges $10 more than that!! The TB I just got off the track two weeks ago is on it, and it's too early to tell but I think I will be very happy with it, as my late horse's paddock-mate was on it and was just blossoming with health while competing Intermediate.


    Agree with others.. if it's not broke...

    I also have to give a chuckle when people are willing to fork out more for "holistic" approaches.. you can find your local cow farm or local feed supply and get the same thing for a fraction of the cost... When I was in Aiken I was buying locally grown oats and beet pulp that came in a plain brown bag.. think I paid 8$ for each meanwhile everyone else would buy the 20$ one[s] from Purina or TC!
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012


    3 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2013
    Location
    Alva, FL
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    168

    Default

    Some times I think we are being *hoodwinked* by feed compinies, as in more $$$ is a sooooo much better feed. Meanwhile they laugh all the way to the bank......


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
    Location
    NY
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    3,415

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Fenfox1 View Post
    Meanwhile they laugh all the way to the bank......

    Oh, they do!

    I worked for a tack/feed store for a while and did a lot of local sleuthing and found out what the feed stores in the area pays the supplier vs. what the customer pays the feed store... next time you go to your local feedstore and buy a bag and exclaim it is more expensive, remember this: most feed-stores only make .25-.75 cent profit on ONE bag!!! So if you are paying 28.50 for a bag of O500 or Ultium it probably cost the store 28$!!!

    All this time I thought feed stores were pulling the wool over our eyes... until I worked with one Purina distributor and saw the feed-store's invoice!!!
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012


    5 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2009
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    1,226

    Default

    If it ain't broke, don't fix it!!!



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2011
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    258

    Default

    I know, I know. I can buy crimped oats at the co-op for far less. They aren't organic, but it would be cheaper. Perhaps I should just mix my own! And if I knew a bit more about equine nutrition other than feeding whats in the bag, I might!

    While it's not exactly "broke", my horse isn't putting on the weight I would have expected on the volume of food she's consuming.

    And for those interested:
    I buy my feed in Maryland, at a local feed store near my house: http://www.promiselandfeed.com/products/products.htm it runs about $17.80.

    I know Tractor Supply about 15 miles away sells it for far more, about $10 more per bag.



  11. #11
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Vermont
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    Default

    You said she's getting 8 quarts a day, but how much does that WEIGH? You may be under feeding the amount she needs/and is recommended.

    Extruded feeds are not as dense as say pellets, so while you may be feeding 8 quarts, you may be short changing yourself on weight. Also, because they are fluffy, it looks like you're feeding A LOT of grain, but really, not that much.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 28, 2011
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SuckerForHorses View Post
    You said she's getting 8 quarts a day, but how much does that WEIGH? You may be under feeding the amount she needs/and is recommended.

    Extruded feeds are not as dense as say pellets, so while you may be feeding 8 quarts, you may be short changing yourself on weight. Also, because they are fluffy, it looks like you're feeding A LOT of grain, but really, not that much.
    Right, I realize this--and that's one reason why I don't like it. I've weighed the food, it's aprox 6lbs. I cannot keep her interested in meal times beyond 8 quarts of feed. What i'm trying to avoid is feeding such a huge volume of feed. I don't think i'm achieving that by feeding the genesis either, however, because their recommended feeding is nearly 10lbs per day.



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2012
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    gulf coast
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    1,178

    Default

    OP I do not see a BS Performance feed on Sentinel's web site, only an LS. This is a Low Starch feed designed for easy keeprs. Check the label and make sure you are feeding it correctly. Weight the hay you are feeding your horse, to be sure you are feeding enough hay. It is much safer for an easy-keeper type horse to be a little thin.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jul. 24, 2004
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    2,887

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csaper58 View Post
    OP I do not see a BS Performance feed on Sentinel's web site, only an LS. This is a Low Starch feed designed for easy keeprs. Check the label and make sure you are feeding it correctly. Weight the hay you are feeding your horse, to be sure you are feeding enough hay. It is much safer for an easy-keeper type horse to be a little thin.
    http://www.sentinelfeed.com/pe.html

    BS Performance is LS (BS Performance LS is the name). It is NOT designed for easy-keepers. It's high fat, high fiber, low starch feed - read the link above. In any case it is an excellent feed - my old TB was on it since the day it came on the market - he held his weight exceptionally well on it - and he'd still be on it if I didn't have to put him down a year ago at age 31.
    "When a horse greets you with a nicker & regards you with a large & liquid eye, the question of where you want to be & what you want to do has been answered." CANTER New England



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Dec. 15, 2005
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    3,900

    Default

    I like to feed a big name brand (e.g., Purina). Some of the little, upscale, feed companies don't screen their corn for toxins and don't have nutritionists on staff. Can you mix a few pounds of Purina Omolene 400 or Equine Senior into her food to make it taste better? I have had good luck with getting our old, picky, guy to eat if he gets a scoop of something new on top of his usual food.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    Apr. 20, 2011
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    814

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by ISR View Post
    I know, I know. I can buy crimped oats at the co-op for far less. They aren't organic, but it would be cheaper. Perhaps I should just mix my own! And if I knew a bit more about equine nutrition other than feeding whats in the bag, I might!

    While it's not exactly "broke", my horse isn't putting on the weight I would have expected on the volume of food she's consuming.

    And for those interested:
    I buy my feed in Maryland, at a local feed store near my house: http://www.promiselandfeed.com/products/products.htm it runs about $17.80.

    I know Tractor Supply about 15 miles away sells it for far more, about $10 more per bag.
    I feel like a bunch of us from the north should get together and buy a truckload from your feed store--- I pay $26 a bag :-(

    I love the LS feed, my TBs have done very well on it. I've found, for the ones that come in a little thin and need just *that* much more, if you add some Rice Bran meal or some canola oil, you'll probably see some weight gain in just a couple of weeks....

    good luck!



  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 28, 2007
    Location
    NY
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    4,891

    Default

    Around thirty years ago, a local barn mixed all their own food. She had huge chests of corn, bran, linseed, flax and I don't know what else. And hanging scales to measure. And she made a steaming hot bran mix every Sunday. Does no one make their own feed anymore ?



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Nov. 25, 2012
    Posts
    93

    Default

    I'm making my own now, local vit&mineral mix included. I did buy straight oats from a big name, and the flax comes from Canada but everything else comes from in-state at our locally owned feed store. I'll let you know in a month or so if it comes out cheaper, and how my horse held his weight, it usually drops some this time of year. (FeedXL is a huge help if you want to go this way. And I found an older basic horse nutrition book at a used book store while I save up for the NRC one. The information is out there!)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  19. #19
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    Jul. 28, 2011
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    258

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by csaper58 View Post
    OP I do not see a BS Performance feed on Sentinel's web site, only an LS. This is a Low Starch feed designed for easy keeprs. Check the label and make sure you are feeding it correctly. Weight the hay you are feeding your horse, to be sure you are feeding enough hay. It is much safer for an easy-keeper type horse to be a little thin.
    Just to echo what ryansgirl said--It is high in fat (12%), high fiber and low starch.

    The horse has hay in front of her 24/7--though she seems to prefer looking for the last morsels of grass in the paddock instead.

    Since I work full time, I can only manage 2 feedings a day, but I have started to add alfalfa cubes (cubes until I can find bales!) into a meal by itself just before my bedtime. The quantity of feed she is on now fills her feed bucket--no room for the cubes!

    Too look at her from the side she looks very healthy, but to look at her dead on shes probably a 4.5 on the henneke scale, and her hips are pronounced (no ribs visible).



  20. #20
    Join Date
    May. 12, 2004
    Location
    Barboursville, VA
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    343

    Default

    One thing to consider about buying local ingredients, quite often they are not texted for mycotoxins and aflatoxins.
    While the big name bagged feeds may be more expensive, you are paying for a safe food source that is tested when ingredients come into the mill and when they leave as a formulated feed. I am fairly familiar with the process that Co-ops and local mills use and they rarely have the resources to test each batch of commodity that comes through their facility. You may never have a problem feeding local oats, corn, barley, etc., but I would rather pay slightly more to get an ingredient that has passed screenings and tests.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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