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  1. #41
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    Jun. 5, 2012
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    177

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    I am also in soggy Fl.
    Have you tried warming up your can of venice turpentine (lid off)? it will penetrate much better... Apply every day till conditions improve.
    Other than that I use biotin as feed supplement but that takes a while to show any effect.
    Also while discussing your horse sore foot issue make sure the trim is not too much...


    1 members found this post helpful.

  2. #42
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Some where in the middle of nowhere.
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTimes View Post
    While I haven't posted here much, I have been a lurker for ages. I find that most arguments stem from the OP becoming defensive. Many questions on the horse care forum are going to end up with the suggestion "talk to your vet" because they are the ones with the education and experience. Often people speak with their vet last to try and avoid the costs associated, but in the long run it would have been cheaper then wasting money and time on products that didn't work. (Not necessarily saying that this is the case in this discussion).
    It's the same in the hunter/jumper and eventing forums, if the OP asks a training question and the response is that they should get help from a professional, the OP always seems offended that strangers on the internet will point blank tell them that they may not have the skills required.

    Anyway, sorry about the novel, but I don't think anyone is being nasty here. It's just two schools of thought.
    1. Go straight to the vet/farrier and rule out major issues
    2. Keep trying products until one works or the problem sorts itself out
    I agree and I hope I did not come across as such. I was simply trying to address that the pony is under the current care of a vet and farrier both are aware of her issues both have agreed not lamanitis a this time.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #43
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
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    Pacific Northwest
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    5,023

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lynnwood View Post
    I agree and I hope I did not come across as such. I was simply trying to address that the pony is under the current care of a vet and farrier both are aware of her issues both have agreed not lamanitis a this time.
    And I hope I didn't come across as criticizing you. I didn't think you were being overly defensive, as GoodTimes implies. I wish folks wouldn't so quickly assume that everyone asking a question has larger problems than just the simple issue they describe, all other vets and farriers are incompetent, the horse owner must be blind, and so on. Owner, vet, and farrier all agree it is not laminitis, yet some read a few paragraphs on here and insist on diagnosing, because their long distance view through the COTH portal is much clearer than any professional with hands on the horse. Not just this thread.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  4. #44
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
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    10,033

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    Fwiw I am not convinced the pony has laminitis. IMO the pony probably has something going on besides just soft soles if the sole depth is good, likely bruising or brewing abscess, as indicated in an earlier post. The only problem is that bruising versus abscess requires 2 different treatments.



  5. #45
    Join Date
    Aug. 22, 2013
    Location
    ON, Canada
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    298

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    To the OP I think people are just trying to look out for you. I really hope it's just "wet feet", but I think the reason people keep bringing the idea of laminitis up is because the ONLY way to diagnose it is imaging. One cannot simply look at a hoof and say "nope, don't worry, the internal structures of that foot are unaffected, even though the foot it sore".
    I also think you've ignored most of the shoeing suggestions as well. If I have one with ouchy feet we x-ray to rule out laminitis. view the sole thickness, and rule out a brewing abscess. Next step? Shoes with pads. Has literally worked every time.
    You also haven't posted any sort of time frame. If this has been going on for awhile you can probably rule out an abscess and come to the conclusion that whichever product you're using isn't working.
    If you don't want to pay for imaging and shoes/pads that's fine. Acknowledging that would probably keep everyone's suggestions within your price range.



  6. #46
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,649

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    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTimes View Post
    To the OP I think people are just trying to look out for you. I really hope it's just "wet feet", but I think the reason people keep bringing the idea of laminitis up is because the ONLY way to diagnose it is imaging. One cannot simply look at a hoof and say "nope, don't worry, the internal structures of that foot are unaffected, even though the foot it sore".
    Yes, this exactly.

    I don't know what laminitis *feels like*, but I read that it is exceptionally painful when a horse is truly laminitic/foundering. However, there might often be some period of time where the symptoms are *soreness* without a specific cause. Eventually it might be proven to be laminitis (by showing rotation on an x-ray), but by then there has been damage.

    After watching a pony completely founder (and was only a day or so from being euthanized when he finally turned the corner), I will forever assume the worst (laminitis) and take the horse off pasture if I am unsure of the reason for soreness.



  7. #47
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    X-rays haven't been done? If they have been done, great, they are indicated in a case like this.



  8. #48
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    Dec. 19, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by GoodTimes View Post
    To the OP I think people are just trying to look out for you. I really hope it's just "wet feet", but I think the reason people keep bringing the idea of laminitis up is because the ONLY way to diagnose it is imaging. One cannot simply look at a hoof and say "nope, don't worry, the internal structures of that foot are unaffected, even though the foot it sore".
    I also think you've ignored most of the shoeing suggestions as well. If I have one with ouchy feet we x-ray to rule out laminitis. view the sole thickness, and rule out a brewing abscess. Next step? Shoes with pads. Has literally worked every time.
    You also haven't posted any sort of time frame. If this has been going on for awhile you can probably rule out an abscess and come to the conclusion that whichever product you're using isn't working.
    If you don't want to pay for imaging and shoes/pads that's fine. Acknowledging that would probably keep everyone's suggestions within your price range.
    Goodtimes

    I have mentioned time frame in my first few posts. Off and on all summer , coinciding with the boughts of wet weather. The ground gets over saturated she spends any time turned out on it she gets a little gimpy particularly on rough surfaces like the asphalt driveway.

    She is perfectly sound in the grass and in the clay ring.

    I've never said I wasn't willing nor didn't want to pay for imaging. I brought it up they felt at this point it was not necessary both firmly believing its the horrid wet weather and constant shifts from really wet to dry and back to really wet.

    I did say that at this point dry weather is weeks away and perhaps next summer I'll just shoe her at the first hint of a wet summer. I've owned her for 11 years she's only been shod for one season when she was showing and jumping more then average.

    Again I appreciate all of the suggestions and just because I don't address each of them doesn't mean I don't take them into consideration.

    I have come to the conclusion that the durasole at least how I was applying it was not effective enough. Hence the thread asking for alternative products techniques.
    "I would not beleive her if her tongue came notorized"



  9. #49
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    Aug. 28, 2006
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    The 2 most likely possibilities for your pony's problems are thin soles and laminitis. X-rays won't rule out laminitis but will give you sole depth and rule out rotation.

    So she tested positive to hoof testers, and deep sulcus thrush has been ruled out?



  10. #50
    Join Date
    Oct. 10, 2007
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    down south
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    I understand glistening to the pros in this. I just always rule on the side of caution. My vet knows I'm want to know for sure and will always do what i say and are happy to do it. Lol I'm sure since he gets more money that way lol. He will suggest things, the wait and see, or whatever and then gives me the option of going further now and I usually do that. There was another poster on here not long ago who's vet and farrier said no way the horse hasn't founder, no lamnitis etc. She came asking on coth and everyone said xray now. She called vet back out and to the vets surprise horse had significant rotation. I just rather be safe than sorry.
    Horses aren't our whole life, but makes our life whole


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  11. #51
    Join Date
    Jun. 14, 2012
    Location
    Maryland
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    50

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    I haven't read all of the posts so sorry if this is a repeat. I use Durasole and SmartSox from Smart Pak. My horse has been barefoot for one year with no huge issues. If he is sore I use magic cushion for a few days and he is fine. It has been so nice not worrying about shoes!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #52

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    A farrier once gave me the tip of putting Pinesole on the hooves. It's designed to draw out moisture and harden the hoof. Plus, it's cheap and easy to get!



  13. #53
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    Dec. 26, 2008
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    193

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    I am also in FL and my TB was on and off ouchy all summer. I called the vet out since it kept happening and he said the typical thin soles, wet weather problems. He mixed up 7% iodine, DMSO, and 10% formalyn ( i think, it is a deriviative or formaldehyde, or it could be that formaldehyde is a derrivative of it...). I painted it on his soles every 3 days and he became sound in a week and I haven't had any issues since. Not sure if you can purchase the ingredients but maybe your vet can mix something similar. He said if I wanted I could also use Durasole. Good luck, we may have rideable weather year round, but the caveat is that the horses feet have to tolerate that weather!


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  14. #54
    Join Date
    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Rising Sun, MD
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    I've had a similar problem with one of my horses before during one of MD's rain, mud, rain, mud, rain some more summers. Your horse does not sound like she has laminitis to me at all.
    I've had excellent success with Durasole and Keratex. But the key is that before either of them gets applied, the hoof needs to be dry. So basically I use a hairdryer on the hoof until it is DRY, then apply the Durasole to the bottom of the hoof. Then I set it down and do the Keratex on the walls. Then I go about my grooming and by the time I'm done, the Durasole on the bottom of the hoof has dried and I apply another coat.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  15. #55
    Join Date
    May. 5, 2006
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    I moved my gelding three weeks ago and between the wet weather and a new environment that isn't as overly-managed as the previous barn, my guy has been very, very foot sore.

    He has been barefoot for the entire almost nine years that I have owned him. But in an effort to give him some relief I had him shod in front. It didn't help at all. His soles were tender and he was building up a horrible case of thrush.

    He is on Previcox for his knee, the vet decided to keep him on it another 30 days. I certainly haven't seen any improvement on the Previcox.

    I did an internet search and found a few mentions of Farrier's Fix. It is a mix of venice turpentine and some oils. I figured it couldn't hurt and ordered some from SmartPak. I applied it the first time on Monday, and then again on Tuesday and Wednesday. Yesterday (Wednesday) was the first time in almost three weeks that my horse has willingly walked on his own. There is noticeable improvement.

    I am impressed with it.
    Sheilah
    Proud Member Of The Lady Mafia
    And
    Sheeple Extraordinaire



  16. #56
    Join Date
    Oct. 19, 2009
    Location
    Ontario, Canada
    Posts
    783

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    If it's just too much moisture in the foot then you need a product to block the excess moisture. I use Cornucrescine Hoof Barrier during the wet season here (fall, before the freeze) to keep my pasture boarded horse's feet from getting too soggy. Initially I apply it daily for 4-5 days, then every other day. If you can keep applying it daily it helps. Paint it all over the frog, sole and wall.

    The farrier noticed a difference in the hoof wall after Hoof Barrier use for six weeks - much less moisture in the hoof.

    I will note that this product does not create a waterproof coating, but just reduces the amount of moisture getting into the hoof structure.


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  17. #57
    Join Date
    Jul. 1, 2010
    Posts
    548

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    thompson water seal will keep the hoof from getting too soggy, if that is what your goal is.
    Charlie Piccione
    Natural Performance Hoof Care



  18. #58
    Join Date
    Mar. 23, 2010
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    640

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    My gelding got foot sore last fall when it rained. For a short time I attributed it soft soles and rocky ground and my farrier agreed. He has very good feet with very thick soles, so it was somewhat mysterious.

    After a couple of weeks I finally called my vet. She suspected laminitis and I had x-rays done. No rotation, but the laminitis was confirmed by an increase in the distance between the hoof wall and the coffin bone when compared to older films. He was never down, and never rocked back, just footy on gravel.

    We tested for Cushings and IR at the time and they both came back negative/normal. He wore hoof boots for the rest of the rainy season and recovered just fine.

    This year we re-tested for Cushings. It came back very high, even accounting for the seasonal rise, and I started him on Prasend immediately. He only has VERY subtle symptoms (aside from the laminitis) of Cushings. He is slow to shed, but does shed all the way. He does not have the fat deposits above the eyes, etc. I don't know if something went wrong with the blood work last year or if it just wasn't advanced enough to show up. We did not retest for IR since he has no symptoms of that, and he is managed as if he were IR anyways.

    If you don't want to spring for x-rays (and they are kind of a pain anyways) it certainly wouldn't hurt to run the bloodwork for ACTH and insulin/leptin.



  19. #59
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    Jun. 13, 2009
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    if the wetness is the only thing bothering her feet, is there any way she can be kept inside more? or can you make a gravel section in her paddock or at least some place she can stand that is dry?



  20. #60
    Join Date
    May. 18, 2009
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    In a log cabin.
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    26

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    Quote Originally Posted by fernwolf View Post
    I live in FL and had the same issue. I have tried all. Only product that worked is Hoof Armor. Using it for years now.
    Does it really work? How long does it last? What about in climates much colder then Florida, with snow, ice and mud?



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