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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2003
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    New York
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    3,363

    Default Possible causes of cow pattie manure?

    Adopted a 4 year old OTTB 4 weeks ago today! Since he stepped off the trailer he's had cow patties as manure-no ball form what so ever and a NASTY evacuate the barn smell to it. Negative fecal, no stomach ulcers as per scoping, 7 days of bio-sponge was useless and won't eat any type of supplement. He's on unlimited 2nd cut grass hay, 8 pounds of triple crown senior (over the course of 4 meals!) and SUCCEED paste.

    Any ideas??? He's the worst eater ever but LOVES his hay!!
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    16,238

    Default

    I'd consider salmonella or giardia.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2003
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    New York
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    Default

    The fecal was tested for all that 3 weeks ago. Next on my list was hind gut ulcers. Anything else???
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
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    Default

    I think investigating hind gut ulcers wouldn't be a bad place to start.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb. 28, 2008
    Posts
    3,955

    Default

    Is your soil sandy at all? I had a horse who never made solid manure and it STANK. Had a history of cow patty manure from previous owner. Tried every product, ran fecals, never figured it out. Best thing was "Probios", manure wasn't solid on that but at least a semi formed patty and didn't have to wash his bum every day.

    Sold him on to a farm that was on clay soil, not sandy like ours, and he never had a problem with manure again. Turned out even the smallest speck of sand irritated his gut for some reason.
    Just because you’re afraid, doesn’t mean you’re in danger. Just because you feel alone, doesn’t mean nobody loves you. Just because you think you might fail, doesn’t mean you will.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,018

    Default

    anaerobic bacteria in the gut can be one cause. My former BO did not clorox her well as I told her to. One pony got diarrhea 2 summers in a row. I have a bottle of the drug that eliminates the anaerobic bacteria. It's metrodiazonole, or something like that. Works well.

    You should always consult your vet. It could be a feed change or a weed in the pasture or something in the hay. Or something else in the intestines.

    Is this the new horse? Didn't your vet eliminate ulcers?

    My horses get psyllium to prevent sand colic. one of the signs of sand colic is diarrhea, but of course you can find the sand yourself in the manure when you put it in water.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov. 12, 2001
    Location
    Dry Ridge, KY USA
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    3,098

    Default

    I second Probios. I bought a 4 year old, OTTB from the Secretariat Center in June. She had terrible cow pattie manure. I started her on Probios and she was pooping normally by the end of the week.

    My other mare gets Probios and EquiShure from KER. The EquiShure helps move stuff through the hindgut.
    When in Doubt, let your horse do the Thinking!



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2003
    Location
    New York
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    Default

    I will try a probiotic next but he will not eat anything in his feed and syringing anything into his mouth is becoming more and more difficult each day between the SUCCEED paste and the biosponge.
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2001
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
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    Default

    If you're still syringing in the biosponge, use the powder and mix it with fruit juice. The biosponge syringes can be reused--filling them is easy if you mix the powder and fruit juice in a ziplock and cut the corner off. Squeeze it like a pastry bag.

    My horse tells me it's quite palatable this way.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2006
    Location
    NY
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    4,328

    Default

    Just FYI about the Probios - it seems to taste really yummy. I have a pony gelding that won't eat anything but he will eat that stuff. All the horses in my barn call to me when they smell it....so it is definitely worth a try...maybe you'll get lucky.



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 14, 2010
    Location
    Earlysville, Virginia
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    3,244

    Default

    I used probios that up came in a syringe. Worked amazingly well when my gelding (on stall rest) suddenly had FOUL smelling poops.
    Charlie Brown (1994 bay TB X gelding)
    White Star (2004 grey TB gelding)

    Mystical Moment, 1977-2010.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
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    1,055

    Default

    We only work with TBs. Personally I don’t like pellet, textured horse feed. To each their own on this. I assume you got him straight from the racetrack? The majority of trainers do not feed pellet or textured feed so this might not be agreeing with him. Do you know what he was getting before you got him? Not sure of the need for a senior feed anyway. Being loose right off the trailer is not unusual and not during a transitional period especially if he came from the track. Did you call and ask if he was this way before you got him? Smithtown, nice area, should still have nice grass something that track horses don’t get much of. This along with the transition could prolong his looseness. Personally I am not a big fan of most sublimates I feel they do more for the owner then the horse to each their own. I would put him on beet pulp for fiber, with Purina Horsemen’s Edge or something of like, 50-50, 3 feedings at 3 pounds each feeding, lightly soak the beet pulp to mix better. Get a hold of if you can a really nice 1st cutting Timothy or Orchard, good leaf, stem, color and smell. Higher in fiber which should help tighten him up. If you have a good 1st cutting and he stays loose cut back on the feed and make sure he tucks into the hay. It may take a couple of weeks but if he remains, bright, eager, and doesn’t hang his head most of the time just monitor. He should work through the transition.
    I generally don’t comment much on feeding and other horse issues because I am not working with the subject horse nor know it’s history or personality. All of this may or may not apply. Contrary to popular believe TBs are generally easy keepers IME.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2008
    Location
    Columbus, OH
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    Default

    I just went through this with my OTTB, in fact she has been close to cow patty manure for years. Finally after trying probiotics, biosponge, ulcer meds, no grain, and floating her teeth, we tried feeding her like she has PSSM. So she is on a fatty diet with alfalfa and hay. Specifically, she gets Tribute Kalm N EZ, Buckeye Ultimate Finish, and alfalfa pellets mixed together. She does not receive sweet feed. Within a week her manure improved, and now she is have manure that is nearly normal (balled but extra moist).



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Jun. 17, 2001
    Location
    chilliwack b.c.
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    1,300

    Default

    we went thru this with one of our boarders.our good local hay was too rich,so went with a good timothy and the coarsest ugly old hay we could find.the mixture is working very well,and we have solid poop!only a horse person could appreciate this!
    mm



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Jan. 12, 2003
    Location
    New York
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    Default

    This guy came from Nee Vocations and hasn't been on the track since last year. He came on pellets and was warned he was picky about feed. The only thing I can get him to eat is senior (plus he coliced) so the vet said senior was good for him. Won't touch a single thing if its wet. I tried beet pulp, alfalfa cubes, alfalfa pellets, rice bran, bran (got desperate!!!) , etc. You name it, I've tried it! He came on alfalfa hay and pellets and I switched him to grass hay. I don't have pasture here just sand paddocks. It can't be the sand causing it because he stepped off the trailer with cow patties and nothing has changed. I'm going to try the probiotics and the vet is coming tomorrow so I'm going to talk to her about the manure again. Our last conversation was to try the biosponge and succeed.
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Jun. 18, 2011
    Posts
    864

    Default

    several years ago I had a horse with very soft and cow patty manure... It was horrible and I was desperate. The barnowner had a mixture of feed, which he produced (he owned a feed mill) Finally I asked him to quit feeding this food and just give oats to my horse. And very strange from that day the manure was perfect...
    I think my horse had problems with some ingredient in this feed.

    So maybe try to reduce the food to very few components. I know you dont usually fee rolled oats over here, but I would try it just for a period of time...
    Owned proudly by my horses and the Pony
    Blacky by Sandro Hit, Amica by Amidou,
    Sarasota (Princess) by Don Schufro and Daysie by Sandro Hit
    and last not least Kassandra GRP by Burstye Orpheus



  17. #17
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    Jun. 30, 2009
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    6,427

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Kiwayu View Post
    The fecal was tested for all that 3 weeks ago. Next on my list was hind gut ulcers. Anything else???
    Did you do a course of omeprazole? (or scope to rule out ulcers?)

    Have you tried pulling him off the grass hay & feeding alfalfa?

    How much water does he drink? 1 horse will stress drink to the point that her manure is water logged - cow patty style.

    I'd be inclined to remove everything from his diet & start again:
    hay only (again I'd feed alfalfa - I'm assuming that NV didn't have the same digestive issues with the horse), if no change, vet consult re omeprazole/metronidazole etc.



  18. #18
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    Jan. 12, 2003
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    New York
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by alto View Post
    Did you do a course of omeprazole? (or scope to rule out ulcers?)

    Have you tried pulling him off the grass hay & feeding alfalfa?

    How much water does he drink? 1 horse will stress drink to the point that her manure is water logged - cow patty style.

    I'd be inclined to remove everything from his diet & start again:
    hay only (again I'd feed alfalfa - I'm assuming that NV didn't have the same digestive issues with the horse), if no change, vet consult re omeprazole/metronidazole etc.
    He was scoped for ulcers 3 weeks ago-negative! The only thing we will never know is hind gut ulcers so maybe I will asked to treat for that to cover my bases. He has had ulcers in the past according to his owner/breeder.
    Kristen

    Kiwayu & Figiso Pictures:
    http://community.webshots.com/user/kiwayu



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 27, 2011
    Location
    SW Ontario
    Posts
    207

    Default

    My TB started with semi-cow patties when he went out on grass at our new place in the spring, which is pretty rich. Not enough to be concerned but frustrating. When I ran out of UGard (which he's been on since his omeprazole course) I switched him to Tractgard because I had a free sample.

    Darned if his poops weren't more normal and less stinky in a week, and he's eating more grass/less hay . The product info talks more about "loosening" things but did the opposite IME.



  20. #20
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    Feb. 1, 2012
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    I think I read somewhere that horses who have had (or have) gastric ulcers are at an increased rate for also having hind gut ulcers. I cannot recall where I remember seeing this.

    It wouldn't hurt to try treating for hindgut ulcers.
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."



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