The Chronicle of the Horse
MagazineNewsHorse SportsHorse CareCOTH StoreVoicesThe Chronicle UntackedDirectoriesMarketplaceDates & Results
 
Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 21 to 40 of 48
  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,538

    Default

    Chia seed would be another good idea--it turns into a "gel" in the horse's gut that keeps them both hydrated and "regular." A lot of athletes take it to keep themselves hydrated. It's also rich in omega-3s, which are naturally anti-inflammatory. It's not cheap, but you only need to feed about 1/3 cup a day.
    Topline Leather -- Unique woven crystal & gemstone browbands

    Topline Leather's Etsy Shop



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    512

    Default

    I have a horse with the same problem. He spent 5 days in the hospital last year when he became completely impacted due to not drinking.

    I add 2 tbs chia seeds to his morning and evening grain, and add 2 cups of water before feeding. The chia sucks the water right up and it keeps him hydrated.

    I also give him an inch of apple juice in the bottom of a small bucket, topped up with water. He gets this after every ride and always out of the same bucket. He now starts to lick his lips whenever he sees that color bucket coming his way, so I know that if he stops drinking I can always get fluids into him that way.
    Savannah Custom Scrapbook Design. For horses...and people, too!
    www.savannahscrapbooks.com
    www.thislifeblog.com



  3. #23
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
    Original Poster
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    12,570

    Default

    Chia seed, that's a new one, too. I'll have to see if Miss Persnickity will eat it. Bought some apple juice today so that's an idea I'll definitely use.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Oct. 14, 2004
    Location
    Connecticut
    Posts
    9,051

    Default

    My mare is a good drinker, but in the winter, I'll add about a tablespoon of table salt to her grain. She also loves the Himalayan Salt, yet won't touch a regular salt lick.

    I did have a horse years ago that would-not-drink. Period. Ended up at Tuft's with Impaction Colic. The Vet's up there mentioned filling a spritz bottle with salted water and spritzing his hay....



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    512

    Default

    The chia doesn't really have a taste so I've never seen a horse object. Just make sure you add lots of water so it converts from a hard seed into a gel-like consistency. It's a little like tapioca when it's soaked.
    Savannah Custom Scrapbook Design. For horses...and people, too!
    www.savannahscrapbooks.com
    www.thislifeblog.com



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,538

    Default

    I've always fed chia dry--no worries, it will turn into a gel once it's inside the horse.
    Topline Leather -- Unique woven crystal & gemstone browbands

    Topline Leather's Etsy Shop



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,538

    Default

    From equinechia.com:

    Dry vs. Wet Feeding

    We recommend feeding EquineChia dry for three reasons:
    1. It is more palatable to horses dry.
    2. It is easy to feed by top-dressing.
    3. All the digestive benefits exist when feeding dry.

    Chia seed is gelatinous and gets soft and slimy when wet. It does not have a shell or husk that requires processing or soaking. This unique feature of Chia seed makes it 100% digestible. The mucilaginous nature of chia seeds gives strong digestive benefits. Unlike dry pellets or other dry supplements, chia seeds do not cause compaction or choke. EquineChia provides gastric and digestive support and healthy GI tract movement.

    Note: A few people soak EquineChia and feed a wet mash. Because chia seeds get slimy (like tapioca), most horses do not like this texture.
    Topline Leather -- Unique woven crystal & gemstone browbands

    Topline Leather's Etsy Shop



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Nov. 20, 2010
    Location
    Upstate New York
    Posts
    4,341

    Default

    So glad Lexy is fine again, and this is a great thread to have for reference!
    Being right half the time beats being half-right all the time. Malcolm Forbes



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frizzle View Post
    I've always fed chia dry--no worries, it will turn into a gel once it's inside the horse.
    It certainly won't do any harm fed dry, but the whole point with a horse who's not drinking is to get MORE water into them. Hence soaking the chia.
    Savannah Custom Scrapbook Design. For horses...and people, too!
    www.savannahscrapbooks.com
    www.thislifeblog.com



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Feb. 5, 2010
    Posts
    2,538

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by SBrentnall View Post
    It certainly won't do any harm fed dry, but the whole point with a horse who's not drinking is to get MORE water into them. Hence soaking the chia.
    Right, but feeding it dry will still help keep the horse more hydrated, and help to keep things moving in the gut. If the horse doesn't like it wet, I don't want the OP to be discouraged & think that the dry seeds won't help her horse.
    Topline Leather -- Unique woven crystal & gemstone browbands

    Topline Leather's Etsy Shop



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Aug. 9, 2007
    Posts
    9,173

    Default

    My horses get their chia seeds from getchia.com. The human grade. I eat some chia seeds, and they have a nice nutty taste, mild, and so they are not rejected by horses. Cheaper if you buy the 3 pack, 12 pounds. And you can buy them direct or on ebay. I've given them dry and wet, doesn't matter to my 2.

    My horses also get Gatorade, 32 oz a day at least. To prevent colic caused by electrolyte imbalance.

    And they get Coca-Cola. Well I've always given Coke to my horses all my life. Turns out it is good for their digestive system. Well it was created by a pharmacist here in GA for indigestion.



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Mar. 8, 2004
    Location
    Baltimore, MD
    Posts
    20,390

    Default

    This thread is so funny! Glad she is doing ok but I doubt throwing any or all of the things mentioned in here is going to make any difference. If it makes us feel better that is a good thing I guess.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2013
    Posts
    378

    Default

    Have you thought that she might have an ulcer? I have a horse, also late 20s, who occasionally colics, goes off his feed, hard keeper-ish, etc. I've recently been following some diet suggestions by Dr. Kerry Ridgeway and other vets, and am already seeing improvement.

    http://www.drkerryridgway.com/articl...cle-ulcers.php

    http://www.succeed-equine.com/articl...with-my-horse/

    http://www1.vetmed.lsu.edu/EHSP/Hors...item51929.html



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Aug. 28, 2006
    Posts
    10,033

    Default

    Louise as long as you're giving her electrolytes I'd add a dozen Tums to her feed too.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Jun. 3, 2007
    Location
    Los Angeles, CA
    Posts
    512

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Frizzle View Post
    Right, but feeding it dry will still help keep the horse more hydrated, and help to keep things moving in the gut. If the horse doesn't like it wet, I don't want the OP to be discouraged & think that the dry seeds won't help her horse.
    True, Frizzle. Although since the seeds have no taste, I've never had a horse refuse them when wet. I just throw in some hay pellets or add to regular grain and the horses can't even tell the chia seeds are there.
    Savannah Custom Scrapbook Design. For horses...and people, too!
    www.savannahscrapbooks.com
    www.thislifeblog.com



  16. #36
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
    Posts
    2,670

    Default

    Just wanted to add: what an awesome BO.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
    Original Poster
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    12,570

    Default

    I do have an awesome BO. She called me today to tell me that Lexy was still doing well, and that she's still playing with adding things to one bucket of water, to see if she can find something that Miss Mare really likes. We discussed the things on this thread, and as soon as I said something about a suggestion to soak the hay, she said "I can do that." So, she's going to try soaking a little first, to see if Lexy will eat it. If she will, I'll get a manure bucket and she'll start soaking the hay. She said that she's done it before, for a mini that needed it, so she knows the ropes. And, this is why I don't even THINK about moving to a barn that's closer to my home. You don't find good people like this very often.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
    Original Poster
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    12,570

    Default

    Just an update on Lexy. The BO called this morning and said that Lexy was off her food and water again. She was, however, passing manure and peeing. We talked about it and decided that there was a possibility of ulcers, which was causing discomfort and that discomfort had lead to her minor impaction colic before. So, the vet was called, and the vet concurred that it was a possibility.

    Lexy is now on a course of ranitidine, to see if that eases the discomfort. We will proceed from there, once we see what results. She has also been taken off of the one gram of bute a day she gets for her arthritis. Instead, we're trying her on a daily dose of Equioxx Paste, though, frankly, at $6.00 a dose, I'm going to have to find a much better deal to be able to keep her on that. She already gets Cosequin with MSM. I thought of some of the "buteless" products, but most of them contain devil's claw, and that is not indicated for use with a horse who may have ulcers.

    Poor girl, I really don't like seeing her off and on in such discomfort.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jun. 7, 2006
    Posts
    9,037

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Louise View Post
    Instead, we're trying her on a daily dose of Equioxx Paste, though, frankly, at $6.00 a dose, I'm going to have to find a much better deal to be able to keep her on that.
    My horse is on Previcox, which is the "dog version" of Equioxx and costs much much less. It is $90 for 60 pills, the horse gets one pill a day. The delivery system is different and the dog version is very potent in horses, so a very small pill works for a horse.



  20. #40
    Louise is offline Schoolmaster Premium Member
    Original Poster
    Join Date
    Oct. 21, 1999
    Location
    Rochester, NY
    Posts
    12,570

    Default

    Yeh, I dug up an old thread here that mentioned Previcox. The problem is that I don't have a dog, and I don't think my cat vet would prescribe it. I doubt very much that my equine vet would, as they're pretty much by the book and won't even prescribe me compounded pergolide, instead of the more expensive Prascend.

    Edited to add that I sent you a PM, meupatdoes, but it wouldn't go through because you box is full. If you'll clear it a bit, I'll try again.
    Originally Posted by Alagirl
    We just love to shame poor people...when in reality, we are all just peasants.



Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 80
    Last Post: May. 31, 2013, 08:31 PM
  2. Sand colic prevention
    By Iride in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: Dec. 2, 2011, 09:53 AM
  3. Sand Colic Prevention...
    By Ibex in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 18
    Last Post: Jul. 16, 2011, 12:32 AM
  4. Colic prevention webinar..
    By Equibrit in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: Jan. 18, 2011, 08:49 PM
  5. Sand Colic prevention?
    By BCEVENTER in forum Horse Care
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: Nov. 14, 2008, 04:55 PM

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •