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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 22, 2012
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    14

    Default Tack room winterizing...

    I have finally got my tack room done located in the barn...it is insulated, but not heated...we live where there is winter.
    What experiences have people had storing saddles etc. in an unheated area over the winter...good or bad? Any ideas for keeping the mice out? What I don't want is mouldy tack, or mice chewing on the saddles or the fleece undersides, or anywhere else for that matter. There is electricity in the tack room for lights, but no heat source, and I worry about a fire....Any ideas would be appreciated.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
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    6,307

    Default

    Regarding mice--is the room sealed with a concrete floor? Shouldn't be a problem then. There are boarding barns all over where people have tack lockers instead of a tack room and the barn is unheated. Bigger issue I've seen is mold from summer without ventilation.
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep. 2, 2005
    Location
    Upstate NY
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    I do not think there is any real way to make a room mouse proof unless it is a solid metal box.

    Keep your room clean and tidy, no food in it. With no heat you are not likely to get a mouse invasion. If you see any sign of mice add a good hunter (cat) or traps.


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  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
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    5,360

    Default

    the bits have to warmed up before use



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
    Location
    Gum Tree PA
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    1,682

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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    I do not think there is any real way to make a room mouse proof unless it is a solid metal box.

    Keep your room clean and tidy, no food in it. With no heat you are not likely to get a mouse invasion. If you see any sign of mice add a good hunter (cat) or traps.
    I suppose it would depend on the rodents in one’s neck of woods and how tenacious. We had a pretty good rat and mouse problem a few years ago. Feed and tack rooms neither were heated. Went down to the feed room one night and it looked like a scene out of Willard. Definitely a U-Tube moment if I had my IPhone with me. They both needed to be rebuilt anyway, the interior. Both had cement floors. After tearing out the wall board, rewired, insulated I lined the bottom and any obvious and or possible entry points with metal lath;
    http://www.homedepot.com/p/27-in-x-8...5#.UkIMEj8biYk and paneled over it. It does not add that much more to the budget nor work. I think it is important to bend the bottom so as to set the wall board, paneling what ever you are going to use on to it. And line the bottom of exterior walls if necessary I don’t feel it is important to cover the whole walls only places where rodents can sit, gain purchase to chew a hole. Unless your budget is really tight and or the space is very large it is very easy to work with and install so it certainly wouldn‘t hurt to do the entire walls. Extremely effective in 5 year no varmints. But just like Travolta’s character in the movie Phenomenon, George Malley who realized after he wired the perimeter of his garden to keep the rabbits out only to find the rabbits still eating his vegetables. You have to keep the door and or the screen door closed other wise they just move in and set up house. Especially when temperatures start dropping.
    I don’t worry about fires in my barn any more then I do in my house. I just make sure that anything that may potentially start a fire is installed correctly. Our tack room is 12X20 and a 6’ electric baseboard that is set very low keeps the chill off. Quickly heats the room up when needed.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul. 19, 2010
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    Gum Tree PA
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    the bits have to warmed up before use
    We just keep a bucket of hot water available when tacking up and drop the bit in it just before slipping the bridle on. If it is really cold a quick towel dry.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by gumtree View Post
    We just keep a bucket of hot water available when tacking up and drop the bit in it just before slipping the bridle on. If it is really cold a quick towel dry.
    we just moved to Texas



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    we just moved to Texas
    We ride without a bit.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
    Location
    NY
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    Keep your leather goods (bridles and saddles, etc) hung up and the mice won't get to them.

    We've unfortunately always had rats at the farm, because our tack room doubles as a grain room and our room is not exactly "air-tight" or hole free.. The grain is stored in metal bins but they scrap for any spilled grain during feed set-up. Unfortunately the slew of cats at our farm did little and these rats were big and tenacious. However, they have never disturbed the tack. Occasionally if a blanket is left on the ground we will find they have nested/burrowed inside of it - one year we even had rat kits in our rain sheet!!

    For a few years we did employ Victor rat-traps but after a few early deaths they were too savvy for that. For the most part, they're not bothersome -- and IMHO, I would rather rats than mice. (Rats and mice do not cohabit the same area) Rat colonies are usually smaller and the bucks are typically run off or killed early -- mice are very small and can go and destroy things rats cant.

    Your best bet is to limit the food, and keep everything off the ground of value.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    We ride without a bit.
    we don't use bridles
    http://i23.photobucket.com/albums/b3...r/DSCN0199.jpg



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by clanter View Post
    it's cheating if you use a neck rope..
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 2, 2003
    Location
    Iowa, USA
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    2,978

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    in the midwest, we don't even need horses. We just float above the ground. Still need whips though.

    To the OPs question, I'm tinkering with an idea for bit warming. I use a hairdryer which is pretty quick, but I either have to hold it while warming, or else if I just put the bridle into a bucket with the hairdryer, I end up with parts of the bit that are hot, others still cold. So, I'm thinking of taking an old wall cabinet that we have in the shop, and making it a bridle-warming cabinet. Have a bridle hanger in there, and a "porthole" that the hair dryer pokes through. Then while I'm grooming I can just have the hair dryer running on low in my bridle warmer cabinet.


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  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    it's cheating if you use a neck rope..
    Well, some times you use one when you start anyway, like here, before going out to gather cattle in the brush for four hours, just like in that picture.

    I will say, our tack room made do with a plain, cheap electric well house heater.
    Worked fine and even made a good spot to put the neatsfoot oil cans to warm up when cleaning and oiling tack.
    When mice got in there, rarely, we would find the hole and used the top of a metal can nailed over the hole to stop them from getting in there.
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  14. #14
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    in the midwest, we don't even need horses. We just float above the ground. Still need whips though.



  15. #15
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    Apr. 13, 2008
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    NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by HungarianHippo View Post
    in the midwest, we don't even need horses. We just float above the ground. Still need whips though.

    To the OPs question, I'm tinkering with an idea for bit warming. I use a hairdryer which is pretty quick, but I either have to hold it while warming, or else if I just put the bridle into a bucket with the hairdryer, I end up with parts of the bit that are hot, others still cold. So, I'm thinking of taking an old wall cabinet that we have in the shop, and making it a bridle-warming cabinet. Have a bridle hanger in there, and a "porthole" that the hair dryer pokes through. Then while I'm grooming I can just have the hair dryer running on low in my bridle warmer cabinet.
    You know those footwarmers/handwarmers? In the winter I used to grab a couple of them and crackle them and then wind them around the bit while I was tacking up. It's not immediate, but by the time you finish tacking up my bits were always warm. Might be worth a try too.

    IMHO, it'd be much easier if you just bought a pet dragon.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012


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  16. #16
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by beowulf View Post
    You know those footwarmers/handwarmers? In the winter I used to grab a couple of them and crackle them and then wind them around the bit while I was tacking up. It's not immediate, but by the time you finish tacking up my bits were always warm. Might be worth a try too.

    IMHO, it'd be much easier if you just bought a pet dragon.
    Dragons are overrated.
    It is hard to keep them confined and they tend to scorch all they touch a bit too much.

    In Europe, we had warm tackrooms and kept the bit in our hand when we were walking over to put it in the horse's mouth, so no icey bits in the winter.

    Then, I am not sure horses care that much if it is cold, as long as it is not so cold their tongue sticks to stuff:
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