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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
    Posts
    1,381

    Default kickboard building question-need answers quick!

    My contractor has started framing in the kickboards for my indoor arena. Right now the compacted base of limestone screenings is in. I am told that the next step is to put in the kickboards and then the final step is putting in the sand. My builder is building the kickboards so that they hover 4 inches above the compacted base. I am only putting in two inches of sand, so that means that the kickboards are going to be hovering two inches above the footing. This seems really dangerous to me. It seems like a foot could definitely get caught in there. Also, it seems like a lot of sand would migrate underneath the kickboards. Should the bottom edge of the kickboards be flush with the packed base? Or flush with the top of the sand? Ideas?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2000
    Location
    Maryland
    Posts
    1,828

    Default

    I have always seen kick boards that make contact with the footing -- no gaps at all. Sometimes there is a pressure treated 2x4 or 2x6 at the very bottom, but there is never a gap. This 'no gap' arrangement has been true in everything from Very, Very High End arenas to One Step Above Homemade arenas.

    *star*
    "Avoid loud and aggressive persons, they are vexations to the spirit."
    - Desiderata, (c) Max Ehrman, 1926


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,811



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul. 14, 2000
    Location
    midwest
    Posts
    10,337

    Default

    Ditto, no gap.



  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,998

    Default

    Indoor arena, I would think no gap. Can not fathom why they would think it needs a gap? Outdoor arena, we do have a gap so water can flow out, otherwise we'd basically have a pond as water wouldn't escape. But even then the gap is pretty small, maybe a couple inches.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug. 14, 2000
    Location
    Rochester,NY,USA
    Posts
    7,425

    Default

    No gap. I had my contractor put a 1" x 6" pressure-treated board at the very bottom and then 3/4" plywood on top. I've seen a couple of older indoors (~20 yrs old) that had rotted out kickboards where it came in contact with the footing due to the moisture in the footing. My indoor is now 23 yrs old and no rot.
    Sue
    Back in my day, we didn't have as many warning labels because people weren't so dang stupid!



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
    Posts
    1,381

    Default

    Yes, there is a 2x6 pressure treated board at the bottom, but its hovering about 4 inches above the base. I can see that you might want a little space in case the ground heaves with the frost, but 4 inches seems like a lot. I will definitely talk to contracter about this today before he gets too much farther.



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
    Posts
    10,430

    Default

    There should be no gap between the base and the bottom of the kick boards, which for your knees sake I hope he is slanting.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr. 11, 2006
    Location
    Collingwood,ON
    Posts
    1,381

    Default How much sand for arena footing?

    The finishing touches are being put on my indoor arena as we speak. I am having a lot of discussions with my excavation/footing guy about how many inches of sand should go on top of the base. The base is 8 inches or so of limestone screened, watered and packed with a big vibrating roller. Under than is larger, coarser gravel which was also watered and packed. I want to start with 2 inches of sand as I figure we can always add more later, but taking it out is a pain. He is telling me that he usually puts in 4 inches, which seems likes so much to me! He is concerned that with only 2 inches of sand the horses will injure themselves when they hit the base and the base will get churned up and mixed in with the sand. Thoughts? I am a dressage rider if that makes any difference.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,373

    Default

    very little (If not all) pressure treated 2 by and 1 by lumber is not treated for ground contact, same for treated plywood

    4by4 and up are treated for ground contact



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
    Posts
    5,811

    Default

    You can get ground contact 2x's, but it may depend on location, and you do have to ask for it.

    Around here, it's no problem because so many bulkheads are built on the lake that suppliers near the lake don't even stock anything else. You can even get 2x6 T&G in stock because that's what the majority of the bulkhead walls are made from. They drive them in the ground vertically behind the rest of the structure.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jan. 26, 2006
    Location
    Fort Worth, Texas
    Posts
    4,373

    Default

    Tom, we don't have water around here

    .



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Dec. 18, 2011
    Posts
    545

    Default

    I'll jump on the "no gap" bandwagon...that gap is dangerous should a rider's or horses' foot slide under the wall for any reason.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Feb. 18, 2012
    Location
    knee deep in Oregon mud
    Posts
    659

    Default

    Depending on the type of sand, 2" is the bare minimum. Upper level dressage or lower to mid level? At the lower levels 2 would probably be fine, but I don't know if it would work as well at the upper levels. Straight sand is fairly high maintenance as far as watering and dragging to keep an optimal surface. Much better with sand and an additive like rubber or fiber.

    At home I have 2" of coarse river sand in my (outdoor)round pen over a compacted base. After a while I did notice that the top inch or so has been dug in to by my overly excitable mare. The round pen doesn't get very much traffic at all, just working the kinks out of a fresh horse that I don't trust to stay put if I come off. It is also HARD! Beach sand might give more cushioning though.

    At the barn that I ride at (mostly dressage with a few hunter/jumpers), they have 3" of construction sand mixed with 2" of wood fiber footing. It is a little on the deep side, but not strain muscles and tendons deep. It also is cushion-y in case you have an unplanned dismount. The wood fiber keeps the sand from compacting or drying out too much.
    It is only through labor and painful effort, by grim energy and resolute courage, that we move on to better things.
    Theodore Roosevelt



  15. #15
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2005
    Location
    Upper Midwest
    Posts
    5,759

    Default

    4" is too much to start with imo. Would you rather add or take some out?
    Siouxland Sporthorses: http://slsfarm.blogspot.com/

    DIY Journey of Remodeling the Farmette: http://weownblackacre.blogspot.com/



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