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  1. #1
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Default Making long lines from mtn climbing rope

    1) 30 feet total, or 30 feet per line (think it is per line)

    2) ideas on how to attach snaps?

    I have read previous threads on this, searched around on the web, but still have no definitive answer to #1.

    I have access to just about any size of (used) rope, so if you have a strong preference, which size do you like?

    How did they do this: http://claymaier.com/supply-dvd-tutorials/long-reins/
    Last edited by Hippolyta; Sep. 10, 2013 at 12:22 AM.



  2. #2
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    4,906

    Default

    There is a certain kind of braid done on the rope to attach the snap, don't know what it is, that is braided back into itself and stitched. My husband used a type of yacht rope, not sure the diameter, he had a few different ones he made. He also made a braided rope halter but had a tougher time with those knots, which is unusual because he is usually very good with knots of any kind.



  3. #3
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    Oct. 16, 2012
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    Across the Atlantic
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    Default

    I have contemplated doing something similar. LOL.

    You could probably get by with tying a double figure-eight knot (what climbers use) to attach your clips. While not the standard thing for horsey stuff, it is an extremely strong knot and it's probably what I would use if making long lines out of tat or old climbing ropes.

    Do you have an old climbing rope you're planning on chopping up? The shortest ones you can buy will be about 30 meters, which is far too long for long lines. When I long-line a horse, I like lines between 15 and 20 feet, although 22 foot lunge lines are fine (there I go, mixing my metric with my English)... I think of climbing stuff in meters, horse stuff in feet).

    Diameter-wise, I would probably use at least a 9 or 10 mm rope. I don't think an 8mm half rope would be that comfortable to hold.



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov. 22, 2005
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    1,852

    Default

    There are different weights of rope so make sure you get one that is not too light. I have a climbers knot done by a friend! on mine and you need about 30 of line after the knot is tied



  5. #5
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    Oct. 13, 2011
    Location
    Central Va.
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    879

    Default

    These are round ropes? Slippery sorta round ropes? Make sure you wear gloves while long lining. I tried lines like that but went back to the flat, cotton-type lines, less slippage. Now I buy lunge lines and cut some off, so they're not dangerously wrapping around parts of me should I not be paying close attention.



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct. 23, 2004
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    Sisters, Oregon
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    Default

    I have several sets of the Clay Maier long lines, they are the best. He lived here at our place for a few years during the time he was perfecting them.

    He uses yachting braid. It is designed not to tangle. Believe me, I have gotten myself in to situations that I should have been completely tangled up!

    You can see in the photo how he has the ends done. He loops them over and wraps them with heavy, waxed thread.

    I think his theory about using the round rope rather than flat lunge line type material is that is does slide better through the rings.
    Kanoe Godby
    www.dyrkgodby.com
    See, I was raised by wolves and am really behind the 8-ball on diplomatic issue resolution.



  7. #7

    Default

    Climber's rope is kernmantle, very different in composition from yachting rope, which is jst a twisted braid of all the same type rope. Kernmantle has an inner core of soft high tensile fibers wrapped in an outer core of abrasion resistant cover (the kern). A common way to make an end loop in yachting rope is the flemish knot, a braid back, but a flemish knot cannot be done in kernmantle.

    You don't need a figure-eight knot to enclose a snap in kernmantle, a water knot (double overhand) will do fine-plenty strong enough and less weight/bulk. You can do this knot with yachting (twisted braid) rope as well.

    Tubular webbing (since you have access to retired climbing gear) also makes good lines.

    Always wear leather gloves driving with climbing gear or any synthetic rope!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2001
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    In Jingle Town
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    35,574

    Default


    are you guys trying to long line elephants?

    a plain knot should hold the snaps in place just fine (I am out of coffee, so excuse my lack of terminology): Thread the line through the snap, double it up, make knot, done.

    They also make those metal brackets you can crimp around the doubled up rope.
    Or let your local boy scout troop do the work for you. Chances are, they have to work on their knots and lashes as it is.

    make sure you melt the ends of synthetic ropes though.

    and a refresher for those pesky knots:
    http://www.trailmeister.com/KNOTS.html
    Quote Originally Posted by Bristol Bay View Post
    Try setting your broomstick to fly at a lower altitude.
    GNU Terry Prachett



  9. #9
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    May. 16, 2005
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    Elmwood, Wisconsin
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    Default

    Rather than knots, you can go to Fleet Farm and buy very
    small U shaped metal clamps for about a nickle each and
    simply tighten the nuts on the plate they come with to
    secure a loop. I use them for securing electric rope for
    my fence.

    For long lines, I actually prefer cotton rope which can be
    purchased from various online catalogs. My DH does
    lovely back braiding to attach the snaps. I find 1/2" to
    be most comfortable and 15' seems to be most comfortable
    for me.
    Robin from Dancing Horse Hill
    Elmwood, Wisconsin



  10. #10
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    Jun. 24, 2004
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    South Park
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    Default

    Use waxed string. It is sticky and there is a special way to wrap it around the rope to secure the loop.
    I made some a few years back for my Shetland pony.
    "When life gives you scurvy, make lemonade."



  11. #11
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    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
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    Default

    I just use two soft longe lines, so just knot a clip on the end of each line and it will work just fine.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
    Join Date
    Nov. 6, 2002
    Location
    Henrico, NC 36 30'50.49" N 77 50'17.47" W
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  13. #13
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    Jan. 27, 2002
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    Default

    I hope it's not nylon line you're thinking---that causes terrible rope burns! i'd only use cotton myself after seeing a fetlock savaged from nylon line.



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2007
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by CDE Driver View Post
    I have several sets of the Clay Maier long lines, they are the best. He lived here at our place for a few years during the time he was perfecting them.

    He uses yachting braid. It is designed not to tangle. Believe me, I have gotten myself in to situations that I should have been completely tangled up!

    You can see in the photo how he has the ends done. He loops them over and wraps them with heavy, waxed thread.

    I think his theory about using the round rope rather than flat lunge line type material is that is does slide better through the rings.
    You have a beautiful farm CDEdriver. I have some of his videos' and I think your farm is in the background, and where it was filmed. It was before he moved east to KHP.
    I have Clay's long lines and love them. They are slippery, sorta, but I always wear gloves when riding or long lining, lunging, etc, so not a worry for me about burn.

    For those planning on going to equineaffaire in springfield, Clay is doing some clinics as well in fantasia. He is an excellent horseman and very knowledgable. His things are spendy, including his video, but of excellent quality.
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Default

    My father taught me long ago to always wear gloves when handling any rope, line, etc. My pal with the line knows all the knots, so I will pass it along to him.

    I sailed for years & I always stunk at knots. I think I have spatial disabilities.



  16. #16
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    Apr. 8, 2005
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    Kentucky
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    Default

    I bought my rope from somebody on Craigslist for about $30. My lines are about 5/8", can't measure exactly since I don't have any calipers. Mine are about 28' each. They used to be longer, but I found they were too long and tangled too easily, so I put them on a horse in draw line mode then marked and cut them to a more manageable length.

    I don't know exactly what kind of rope it is, because I don't know anything about mountain climbing, but it's tightly braided round rope that looks like this. It's pretty hefty in weight.

    To attach snaps, I used rope clamps. They're a whole lot easier than trying to figure out some way to knot them cleanly.



  17. #17
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    Default

    do you hammer the rope clamps closed? (sorry if this is a dumb question)



  18. #18
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    Apr. 8, 2005
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    do you hammer the rope clamps closed? (sorry if this is a dumb question)
    I can't remember. A hammer will work, but I think we might have used a big pair of channel-lock pliers to squeeze them.



  19. #19
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    Sep. 27, 2000
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    Default

    I made a lunge line from climbing webbing that is flat, so the same general shape as a regular lunge line made from nylon webbing. Like this, but a bilious shade of yellow. I stitched a carabiner-type snap at one end using a SpeedyStitcher and tied a knot in the other end. That was back in 1982 and I still have it.
    The Evil Chem Prof



  20. #20
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Default

    You have to use whatever you have handy, but for working with horses, cotton ropes are the kindest to anything they may wrap around, synthetics will burn human or horse skin much faster.

    I have tried handling both, climbing rope and marine rope to work with horses and never could get a good feel from it, not like web or cotton braid, or leather, but leather is hard to keep clean in some uses like longing would be.

    Many closed competition barrel racing and playday reins are made out of synthetic materials.
    Those reins just don't seem to have much feel to them if you try to train with them.
    That is why I wonder how any such would work to drive or longe horses.

    There is a crimping tool for those that want to use the crimpers to attach any kind of rope to snaps.
    If I remember right, they are called "shag tool" and looks like a small wire/bolt cutter with notches of different sizes to crimp with.



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