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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2008
    Posts
    3,280

    Default Anyone gone from an electric to a gas stove?

    My house has a gas furnace, but nothing else is gas powered. My stove is original to the house (a 1985 electric GE) and starting to have a few problems. As I've been looking at options for upgrading, I keep coming back to gas. Dad swears that running the gas up to the kitchen is no big deal (he's a general contractor and has a buddy who does this for a living), but I've only occasionally cooked on gas so I'm a bit leery of committing a chunk of cash to something I'm not really familiar with.

    Thoughts? Advice?
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2000
    Location
    Greenville, MI,
    Posts
    12,077

    Default

    No have had electric for the past 15 years, But the house I just bought has one of those fancy Ceramic cook top ovens.
    IT is sort of scary, IT gets REALLY hot, but has all kinds of settings.
    Be careful running a gas line, Have the gas company do it.
    As for cooking on gas, it is actually great because it is so easy to fine tune the flame!
    Most cooks prefer gas!
    "you can only ride the drama llama so hard before it decides to spit in your face." ?Caffeinated.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec. 11, 2006
    Location
    Cheesehead in Loudoun Co, VA
    Posts
    2,539

    Default

    I miss my gas stove. My electric's burners are wobbly, can't do a thing about it. I don't have the precise heat control that I had with gas. I can't char a pepper or make smores. Once the burner was lit, it didn't matter if the power went out while I was cooking (if the power was out, the sparker-thing wouldn't work to light but, I could use a match). The burners cool down much faster than electric, especially the flat tops that hide heat. You can immediately remove the heat when the flame is turned off, so you can still leave food on the stove to rest without continuing to cook. There's less ambient heat to the rest of the kitchen.

    Gas oven temps are hotter at the top so baking requires rotation and placement farther from heat source. Gas gives off moisture when cooking, creating a humid heat rather than the dry heat required for effective roasting. Like any oven, it has its quirks and you get used to them.
    I'm not arguing, I'm just explaining why I'm right
    Violence doesn't end violence. It extends it. Break the cycle.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct. 1, 2004
    Location
    Magnolia, TX
    Posts
    5,706

    Default

    I've cooked on both and MUCH prefer gas. You get better heat control than with electric. Once you get used to it, you'll probably never look back.
    Jer 29: 11-13


    4 members found this post helpful.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
    Location
    Lexington, KY
    Posts
    19,579

    Default

    I've had both. I prefer an electric convection oven with a gas stove.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant


    1 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr. 22, 2011
    Location
    the Armpit of the Nation
    Posts
    3,173

    Default

    I love gas ranges-really dislike electric. The gas temperature control is so much faster - less burning stuff. Also if you lose power you'll still have at least the cooktop to cook with, using a match to light the burner. Mine is a stainless steel GE Profile 5-burner, with the 5th burner being in the middle and long for using the provided cast iron griddle. The only thing I dislike on mine are the handles/controls, which looked great for a while but seem to have melted-they are only painted to look like SS, and I'll have to replace them. The oven works perfectly. I love it!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2001
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    1,109

    Default

    We have a gas stove and I have a heck of a time cooking on an electric w/o burning everything. Gas gives you a much more even temp.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov. 5, 2002
    Location
    way out west
    Posts
    3,193

    Default

    When I moved in six years ago I remodeled the kitchen and put in a Wolf dual fuel range with gas burners and an electric oven. Best of both worlds. I much prefer to cook with gas. It's faster and lets you have more precise control over the temperature. It wasn't a big deal to run the gas line because the room under my kitchen is an unfinished storage room, so the contractor had easy access.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    938

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I've had both. I prefer an electric convection oven with a gas stove.
    This is what I have. Hubby was used to gas, as they had their own gas well on the farm, so when our stove went kaput, we got the gas top/electric convection/regular oven combo. Really like it, although I keep getting told I cook at too high a flame, but that is because I was always used to electric.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Aug. 12, 2010
    Location
    Westford, Massachusetts
    Posts
    4,023

    Default

    Yes, and I'll be doing it again soon. In the old house, we had an aging electric range for years...I kept wishing it would break so we could get gas. It refused to die, so DH finally decided to get me a gas range for my birthday a few years ago. I grew up with gas and really don't like cooking on electric. The gas range was awesome!

    Now, we've moved and the new house, again, as an old (1985) electric range, but also has gas to the house for the heat and hot water. I'll have this ranged switched out for gas soon.

    Bringing gas into the kitchen, if it's already in the house is no big deal. You just need a gas certified plumber to do the work.

    Gas is far nicer to cook on...you don't have to wait for the burner to heat up (or cool down) and you have much more precise control over the heat. Plus, when there is a power outage, you can light the stove top with a match and still have hot food. Electric ovens deliver more even heat and some people who bake a lot like to have a dual power range (gas cooktop and electric oven), but they are expensive and I'm not big on baking.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,519

    Default

    I miss my electric stove. The gas stove I have now is older but I can't get the dang thing to simmer. It burns everything I put on it or in it. I'm sure a newer appliance would be better but I had cooked on my electric stove for 10 years and we knew each other well. I can't get along with the gas stove at all.



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2003
    Posts
    2,652

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by cowboymom View Post
    I miss my electric stove. The gas stove I have now is older but I can't get the dang thing to simmer. It burns everything I put on it or in it. I'm sure a newer appliance would be better but I had cooked on my electric stove for 10 years and we knew each other well. I can't get along with the gas stove at all.
    You need a heat diffuser: http://www.amazon.com/SIMMER-Aluminu.../dp/B00012K5P2

    I won't go back to electric. No way.
    Don't tell me about what you can't do. That's boring. Show me what you can do. - Mom


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #13
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,236

    Default

    I grew up with a gas stove and learned to cook with gas. I have been stuck with electric stoves much of my life since then and hate them because they are hard to calibrate and if a pan is slightly out of flat, heat unevenly.

    You are so fortunate to be set up with what you need to switch away from electric. (Moreover, you can use the stove during a power failure and even heat the kitchen with it if that occurs during the cold months.)
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein


    2 members found this post helpful.

  14. #14
    Join Date
    Oct. 4, 2003
    Location
    Hurdle Mills, NC
    Posts
    4,131

    Default

    Another fan of gas. Stuck with electric for decades and finally got what I wanted for the same reasons others have mentioned.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #15
    Join Date
    Oct. 30, 2008
    Posts
    3,280

    Default

    Y'all rock! Thanks!

    For those with gas cooktops and electric ovens--are you using separate appliances or can they be found all-in-one so to speak. My kitchen is small. And I'll likely replace the range well before I can afford to redo the cabinets. I feel like I'm just taking baby steps with my home!
    Flip a coin. It's not what side lands that matters, but what side you were hoping for when the coin was still in the air.

    You call it boxed wine. I call it carboardeaux.



  16. #16
    Join Date
    Feb. 3, 2005
    Location
    Southern Ontario
    Posts
    938

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    Y'all rock! Thanks!

    For those with gas cooktops and electric ovens--are you using separate appliances or can they be found all-in-one so to speak. My kitchen is small. And I'll likely replace the range well before I can afford to redo the cabinets. I feel like I'm just taking baby steps with my home!
    Mine is an all-in-one, Frigidaire 'Gallery' series, gas burners, combination electric/convection self-cleaning oven, and a bottom drawer with a 'warming' setting, but I just use it to store baking sheets and pans.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #17
    Join Date
    Oct. 20, 2001
    Location
    San Jose, CA
    Posts
    1,138

    Default

    I grew up with electric and at 32 have gas for the first time in my life and I hate it. It could just be I have a crappy low-quality stove (I'm a renter), but I find it very difficult to figure out where the flame should be for low, med, high, etc. well, I guess high is easy, but anything other than high is not. I really miss my electric stoves.

    I also just hate the worry about gas leaks.



  18. #18
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by LauraKY View Post
    I've had both. I prefer an electric convection oven with a gas stove.
    This is what I prefer too. More expensive but well worth it. Love, love my gas. DH even prefers the gas and he cooks very very little.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  19. #19
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
    Posts
    3,191

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by jen-s View Post
    Y'all rock! Thanks!

    For those with gas cooktops and electric ovens--are you using separate appliances or can they be found all-in-one so to speak. My kitchen is small. And I'll likely replace the range well before I can afford to redo the cabinets. I feel like I'm just taking baby steps with my home!
    Mine is all in one. Gas top with electric convection stove. Comes in and out as one unit like any other stove. DH ran the propane lines for us and when the propane company came out with the bigger propane tank they line checked for leaks. It was no big deal to run the lines.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #20
    Join Date
    Nov. 8, 2005
    Location
    NC
    Posts
    2,236

    Default

    Cooking gas for safety reasons is scented with volatile ethyl mercaptan (the sulfur analogue of ethyl alcohol) which reeks to high heaven in amazingly minute quantities. If there is a leak or a pilot light is out for more than a few moments, you'll notice it in a heartbeat, long before there's any material danger. The solution is to turn off the gas line and air out the house. If a pilot light is out, it can be safely re-lit once the area is aired out.
    If I knew what I were doing, why would I take lessons?

    "Things should be as simple as possible,
    but no simpler." - Einstein


    2 members found this post helpful.

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