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  1. #1
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    Oct. 18, 2001
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    Between two NC cities.
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    Default Opinions on shipping boots vs stable bandages and bell boots on a DIY XC road trip?

    What would you do and WHY?



  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr. 14, 2006
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    Saco, Maine
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    Shipping boots. I haven't seen anyone wrap a horse correctly with stable wraps since about 1972. People who wrap to the fetlocks and put on bell boots always leave the pasterns exposed. It is idiotic. I'd put on the big Dover 3 strap boots and be done with it. How many hours will they be in the boots? If you have extended stops for water, peeing, lunch, etc, pull the front boots so the legs can air out and you can see if there is any trouble brewing. Unless it is 100 degrees for 8 hours straight in there, they should be good.
    Proud and achy member of the Eventing Grannies clique.



  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr. 13, 2008
    Location
    NY
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    2,197

    Default

    DEPENDS on the length of the trip and what kind of trailer, imho.

    in a stock, i dont put boots or wraps on - there is nothing (theyd have to try hard) for the horse to damage themselves on.

    in a slant, i'd be more inclined to do stable wraps w bellboots - because of amt of tension put on the horse's body while the vehicle moves. however, if your horse is going to be on a slant for like 12 hrs, it may be better to put shipping boots.

    shipping boots for protection, stable wraps for support.
    AETERNUM VALE, INVICTUS - 7/10/2012



  4. #4
    Join Date
    Dec. 14, 2007
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    Wilsonville, Ontario, CANADA
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    Default

    Im in the "never ship with boots or bandages camp". My trailer is safe and 99.9% of the time they load and ship well with no issues. When I send them commercially on long hauls (East Coast to West Coast trips that can take days) its a disaster waiting to happen IMO, to expect any commercial hauler to try and wiggle safely in and out of a stall to fix a slipped or undone wrap or boot without getting their head kicked in. They simply wouldnt do it and I dont blame them. The bandages / boots also get sodden and heavy with manure and urine on long hauls and that cant be fun or healthy for the horse to stand in either

    One young mare I bought years ago from the west coast was not well handled, never shipped, never left the home farm until I bought her at 3 years of age. Her owner made the decision to ship her in boots and I was furious to put it mildly. Since she had never had boots on before she spent a lot of time trying to kick them off which really pissed off the trailer driver and I couldnt blame him. She arrived with 1 off that was now trampled into 3 days worth of manure and urine and the other 3 were down around her ankles and the hind ones disgustingly soaked in manure and urine. Got her into her new stall and she was freaking out at being in new surroundings anyhow, TOTALLY freaking out with these wet, cold heavy things on her hind legs that she couldnt get off and she was firing with her hind legs constantly. We had a chain over her nose and a twitch and she wanted NO part of me going back there to take them off and I really thought at times I was about to die. The dumbest move in the world to have sent her with anything on her legs at all. Now I make it a point of telling former owners I dont care what their feelings or thoughts are on the situation, I have chosen a safe, reputable carrier to ship my new horse. Its my decision now. DO NOT stick anything on their legs please!


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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by RiverBendPol View Post
    Shipping boots. I haven't seen anyone wrap a horse correctly with stable wraps since about 1972. People who wrap to the fetlocks and put on bell boots always leave the pasterns exposed. It is idiotic. I'd put on the big Dover 3 strap boots and be done with it. How many hours will they be in the boots? If you have extended stops for water, peeing, lunch, etc, pull the front boots so the legs can air out and you can see if there is any trouble brewing. Unless it is 100 degrees for 8 hours straight in there, they should be good.
    I'm with you. I've not seen anyone able to properly wrap with standing wraps. Even my vet laughs and says that he knows as soon as he leaves that I'm going to unwrap and rewrap.
    "We can judge the heart of a man by his treatment of animals." ~Immanuel Kant



  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2007
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    Westchester County, NY
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    Default

    If it's a horse that I'm worried about, I use actual shipping wraps, a la my pony club upbringing. Same thing if I want the compression after a hard workout.

    If it's a horse/trailer set-up that I'm not worried about, I use the Velcro boots. I had one horse who would absolutely freak out about the restriction in the fetlock and refuse to load. He wore stable bandages and bell boots because it was the only option.



  7. #7
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Granted, this was for an injury, but I'm pretty sure I know how to wrap to not leave leg exposed when adding bell boots

    Many shipping boots at just too hot to be left on for hours at a time. I know mine are. I love my boots - perfect for going to a show. I also used them for a 7 hour drive in Jan one year.

    But if it was a multi-day trip in anything but cold weather, I'd use standing wraps, as the odds of them sliding or being stepped on are next to nil.

    It's not my horses I worry about. It's other drivers that might (and have) cause me to swerve and cause a horse to step on himself that I worry about. But even then, if the horse was just adamant about not having anything on his legs and I didn't have a choice to not trailer him, he'd go nekked.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET



  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb. 6, 2000
    Location
    MA
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    Default

    If it were me shipping, I'd do standing wraps.
    If I were handing the horse off to someone else, either shipping boots or nekkid.
    "It's like a Russian nesting doll of train wrecks."--CaitlinandTheBay

    ...just settin' on the Group W bench.



  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2005
    Location
    Northeast
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    10,259

    Default

    For long haul tractor trailer travel-bare.
    For tag along trailers-Quilts and wraps, from coronary band up.
    For GN -Woof, Lende shipping boots.
    Some riders change their horse, they change their saddle, they change their teacher; they never change themselves.



  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr. 8, 2004
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    The Great, uh, Green (?!?!) North!
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    My mare hates shipping boots, so I either ship in bells + brushing boots (yes, I know this leaves the pasterns exposed, but it's something), or in standing wraps covering the pasterns since yes, I do know how to do them properly
    "Adulthood? You're playing with ponies. That is, like, every 9 year old girl's dream. Adulthood?? You're rocking the HELL out of grade 6, girl."



  11. #11
    Join Date
    Mar. 24, 2004
    Location
    Pottstown, PA (East Coventry)
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    3,014

    Default

    I used to religiously ship in shipping boots. I have the type that covers the hock and the knee. I like the extra coverage compared to shipping wraps. I like that if I have an up horse when I get to the destination I have a prayer of safely getting the boots off.

    I have never had to haul longer than 6 hours. I might make different decisions for really long hauls. I would not ship commercial hauler with anything.

    Current horse really really hated things on his hind legs- shipping boots, XC boots etc... so I got out of the habit of putting them on. I should go back to using them as he is fine with his legs wrapped now.

    I have a safe trailer. He hauls well. My reasoning for normally using them is other drivers. We have all seen the threads with the trailer opened up like a sardine can, or the flipped trailer. Most of us that have done any hauling has had the a$$hole that just has to jump in front of the horse trailer, go 40 feet and slam on the brakes to turn in a driveway.

    I alway worry that something like that will happen and I will need to slam on my brakes hard due to idiot other driver and one of the horses will go down or really scramble. I am more worried if I have two horses since scrambling horses may scrape up neighbor horse's legs under the divider.
    Oh, well, clearly you're not thoroughly indoctrinated to COTH yet, because finger pointing and drawing conclusions are the cornerstones of this great online community. (Tidy Rabbit)



  12. #12
    Join Date
    Feb. 26, 2011
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    Default

    I always ship in standing bandages. I haven't used boots since I was a kid and therefore hadn't learned to properly put on bandages. I don't even own a pair of boots.
    From AliCat518 "Seriously, why would you NOT put fried chicken in your purse?!"



  13. #13
    Join Date
    Jan. 11, 2012
    Location
    High Desert, SoCal
    Posts
    278

    Default

    I use sports medicine boots and bell boots. I have had horses tear up shipping boots with their shoes and then tear into their skin. I always say better to be safe than sorry. The sports medicine boot/bell boot combo leaves only a tiny gap uncovered.
    Allah took a handful of southerly wind, blew His breath over it, and created the horse. Thou shall fly without wings, and conquer without any sword, O, Horse!
    Anonymous Bedouin legend



  14. #14
    Join Date
    Dec. 13, 1999
    Location
    Greensboro, NC
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    Default

    Keep in mind that neoprene does one job very very well, and that is trap heat.
    ______________________________
    The CoTH CYA - please consult w/your veterinarian under any and all circumstances. - ET


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