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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
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    8,444

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    I would say, try riding some in all kinds of western saddles before just buying one because of a picture on the internet.
    That's what I'm trying to do! It sure is hard when there are so many different types! But I'm learning . . . I keep going to the tack stores and sitting in different things and finding patterns of what I like and I don't. I would much prefer to buy something from my local store than online, as I can keep taking things home and trying them and it doesn't cost me a fortune. I think I'm getting pretty good at figuring out what is fitting Mac and what isn't - for example, I brought home a saddle yesterday and put it on his back and immediately was like, Nope! I would have been really bummed if I spent money to ship that saddle to me for a 5-minute looksee!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Mar. 11, 2007
    Location
    Montana
    Posts
    5,719

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    For what the OP POPO (LOL) posted that Rocking R would work fine, though I think it was posted as an example of the entire brand, not directed specifically to be bought.

    For occasional beginning cow work that saddle would be just fine and especially for trail and area riding it would be great. Buying a cow working saddle on a "maybe someday" would be silly when tomorrow she's riding on the trail and in the arena.

    We have a Dakota saddle; I wouldn't buy another one. It's worked for my son and his horse really well but it didn't work at all for me and mine. The leather was butt ugly when we got it and it took a few gallons of oil and lots of sunshine to make it better.... I didn't like the rigging on the tree-it was unstable and caused some some soring on my horse before we figured it out and fixed it. It's been fine since but I don't lose any sleep when my teenage son leaves it out in the rain on the hitching post or spills his mountain dew all over it! LOL

    I would buy a Rocking R and probably will for my next trail saddle when I'm done with my current hard to fit horse. I've seen them first hand and been very impressed with them and know several happy owners.



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jan. 4, 2007
    Location
    TX
    Posts
    43,103

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pocket Pony View Post
    That's what I'm trying to do! It sure is hard when there are so many different types! But I'm learning . . . I keep going to the tack stores and sitting in different things and finding patterns of what I like and I don't. I would much prefer to buy something from my local store than online, as I can keep taking things home and trying them and it doesn't cost me a fortune. I think I'm getting pretty good at figuring out what is fitting Mac and what isn't - for example, I brought home a saddle yesterday and put it on his back and immediately was like, Nope! I would have been really bummed if I spent money to ship that saddle to me for a 5-minute looksee!
    A time or two we hauled a hard to fit horse to the saddle shop and tried saddles in the parking lot.
    Last edited by Bluey; Sep. 10, 2013 at 05:56 PM. Reason: Edited to change a word that didn't make sense.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Apr. 17, 2002
    Location
    between the barn and the pond
    Posts
    14,495

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    Yes, I took horses to Rocking R. And later we took a weekend and took one to TN to try saddles at three different shops



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul. 4, 2004
    Location
    E. Washington
    Posts
    734

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bluey View Post
    A time or two we hauled a hard to fit horse to the saddle shop and tried saddles in the parking lot.
    Just did that today. I just picked up a Courts Lite roper, originally a ladies roper. More of a cow horse saddle. Nicely made and with some minor adjustments will fit my hard to fit mare nicely, really fits my other horse well and I found it comfortable, or as comfortable as trying it out in shorts. I have a Courts ladies all around custom on order since July, but will still be several months before its ready. I had to have something so ordered this stock saddle. Trying to find something used has been a nightmare, but this will work. Either I will find it a new home later or will have two new saddles that will fit both horses interchangeably.



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Nov. 2, 2009
    Location
    Iowa
    Posts
    516

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pocket Pony View Post
    That's what I'm trying to do! It sure is hard when there are so many different types! But I'm learning . . . I keep going to the tack stores and sitting in different things and finding patterns of what I like and I don't. I would much prefer to buy something from my local store than online, as I can keep taking things home and trying them and it doesn't cost me a fortune. I think I'm getting pretty good at figuring out what is fitting Mac and what isn't - for example, I brought home a saddle yesterday and put it on his back and immediately was like, Nope! I would have been really bummed if I spent money to ship that saddle to me for a 5-minute looksee!
    If you had a hard to fit situation you might say what that is as certain brands of saddles have certain qualities that work better for some horses



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
    Posts
    8,444

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    China Doll, I just got my new saddle a few weeks ago. Turned out that Mac needed a flatter, more mule-shaped tree in extra-wide. Most of the saddles I tried were too narrow or had too much rock (they'd hit me in the backside as they popped up from his back). I did get one on trial that I really liked but in the end the angle just wasn't right for him. I'm in the process of finalizing adjustments (stirrups for me, pad for him) but I love the saddle so far - it is a Crestridge. I'll have to get pictures of us moseying along the trail one of these days!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct. 5, 1999
    Location
    A place called vertigo
    Posts
    12,598

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    I have a Circle Y Julie Goodnight Monarch, which is a trail saddle and was extremely comfy the first time I rode in it. Love it. I even show locally in it. Here is the link to her saddles:

    http://circley.shptron.com/c/saddles...ak-performance

    My understanding is that the cost of saddle trees is pretty similar from tree to tree. The difference in saddle pricing is due to the quality if leather, tooling, and silver. I would spring for a bit higher quality leather, it's just more comfortable to ride in. My Monarch saddle has very soft, supple leather and the seat is comfy to sit in even on a 2 hour long trail ride.

    I ordered mine from horsesaddleshop.com. They were able to get shorter custom fenders (I'm 5'0) for me. Also, many of the older saddles are HEAVY - like 50 lbs. The newer saddles are much lighter, coming in at 30 lbs or less.



  9. #29
    Join Date
    Dec. 24, 2010
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    470

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    What trees do the Crestridge saddles use?

    My mustang, while not as wide, also needed a more mule shaped tree, lol. Maybe they should call it a mustang-shaped tree



  10. #30
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
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    You know, I think they use their own (as opposed to Steele trees). It was with the saddle fitter, who had the fitting forms from Steele, that we realized that he needed flatter bars but with more room at the shoulder and Steele's mule tree. My saddle fitter had some demo Crestridge saddles so I had tried the extra-wide and the wide. Mac liked the EW better but I liked the seat/twist of the W better, so they made my saddle with the twist of a W but the width of an EW, if that makes sense. I also couldn't decide between 15" and 16" because I was pretty sure 15" would be too small but 16" a tad big, so they made me a 15.5" and it is perfect, I love it! Mac seems to like it, as he isn't fussy at all while tacking up or cinching up, he's freer in the shoulders especially in some lateral work, and he lifts his back nicely. There's nice, even pressure underneath, from the top of the tree to the bottom. I like their rigging system, as I find it provides more stability than having one cinch in front and one in back.

    They have a page about measuring your horse and you on their website: http://crestridgesaddlery.com/HowtoMeasure.html. They also have a suggestion for back-mapping, which was very helpful: http://www.crestridgesaddlery.com/backmap.html
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  11. #31
    Join Date
    Dec. 24, 2010
    Location
    South Florida
    Posts
    470

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    Neat, and glad you found a saddle that works!



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