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  1. #81
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    Just adding to the old =/= skinny thought. This guy was FORTY-FIVE when this photo was taken:
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xNaAY1VLd-...0/IMG_3411.JPG


    8 members found this post helpful.

  2. #82
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedmondDressage View Post
    WOW, she looks fantastic! Its those hardy old stock horse bloodlines (and loving care obviously ). My 1983 model is a hardy old guy too. This is him at the tail end of a pretty cold/wet winter this year. I hope he's still around and looking fabulous at 35 too!
    Redmond, he's so handsome! My old girl is still as sound as she was 20+ years ago. I keep waiting for her to calm down under saddle but she's still the same hot, forward ride she always was.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #83
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    Quote Originally Posted by harnessphoto View Post
    Just adding to the old =/= skinny thought. This guy was FORTY-FIVE when this photo was taken:
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xNaAY1VLd-...0/IMG_3411.JPG
    OMG! Hubba hubba - what a nice looking horse!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  4. #84
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    Aug. 15, 2008
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    Further proof that if anyone ever has any questions about caring for the thin, the infirmed, the old...anything...there are plenty of people here on this board who really know what they are doing and most likely happy to share their knowledge and experience.

    There is no excuse. None.
    "Aye God, Woodrow..."


    6 members found this post helpful.

  5. #85
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    Oct. 27, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by Snowflake View Post
    Redmond, he's so handsome! My old girl is still as sound as she was 20+ years ago. I keep waiting for her to calm down under saddle but she's still the same hot, forward ride she always was.
    Thank you! He's my baby, had him since I was 10 so 22 years now My guy is still sound too! He got a stone bruise one time back when he was about 12 but that's it, never a bad step otherwise. I don't ride Rey much anymore save for an occasional bareback jaunt but he's the same, possibly more of a firecracker now than he ever was when he was younger I ride dressage now so I'm kind of a warmblood gal but when I'm old and no longer competing I want something just like our oldsters. I just fear they won't breed them like that anymore by that time!

    Quote Originally Posted by harnessphoto View Post
    Just adding to the old =/= skinny thought. This guy was FORTY-FIVE when this photo was taken:
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xNaAY1VLd-...0/IMG_3411.JPG
    Holy CRAP! 45?!?! That is freakin' amazing. Seriously, he looks 12. Out of curiosity, what is he?

    Side note - I'm kind of loving the turn of this thread. We can (and should) bash people like this for what they do... But seeing all these beautiful, well fed old guys and girls is good for restoring faith in humanity.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  6. #86
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedmondDressage View Post
    Holy CRAP! 45?!?! That is freakin' amazing. Seriously, he looks 12. Out of curiosity, what is he?
    He was a Morgan. I can't take credit for his care (he belonged to a friend), but he lived a wonderful life. Eventually his arthritis got to be too much and they had to let him go.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  7. #87
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    Sep. 5, 2007
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    I knew a family who bought a mare out of the kill pen to take her home and let her die a quiet, happy death in a comfortable pasture. Vet said she was probably about 35 years old and probably wouldn't last two months... 10 years later the ol betch (she really was a nasty thing!) was still kickin it around the pasture with no intentions of going anytime soon! The only way you could tell her old age was that as an Appaloosa, she had no tail! Like, literally a stump with a few short hairs left to it. And yes she got regular trims and routine vet care. For all I know the old goat is still kickin it In her fifties! As long as she was healthy and comfortable, they were going to keep her around.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  8. #88
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    Jul. 20, 2007
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    Okay- I have no dog in this fight at all. But I do want to say that I know Aspenlucas personally as we went to college together back in the 90's. Her horses that she kept at school were always very well taken care of and she was quite the rider. The last time I saw her was a couple of years ago when I went up to her area to pick up a "free" horse she had told me about at a barn where she was boarding some of her horses. I stopped at her house first (met her very sweet girls) and then we went on to the barn. Every animal I saw in her care (dogs, cats and horses) were in great condition. I also know a couple people who have purchased horses from her breeding program and they are quite nice and doing well in active competition.
    That said, I have no idea what conditions are like currently and I am neither defending or accusing- just stating what I saw a couple of years ago.
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain


    3 members found this post helpful.

  9. #89
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    Such fantastic looking older horses! I'm sure there's penty in every breed, although it does seem longevity is a specialty in certain breeds. I've known a LOT of Morgans and Arabians that seemed to go on forever. Reaching their 30s seems to be a given. 40s isn't impossible. I have known a handful of really old Appaloosas too. And ponies go forever and ever. I think they all made deals with Da Debil.

    When blanketing horses for winter, especially aged or health-compromised ones...ALWAYS check under that blanket on a regular basis. Unhook straps and lift a side once a week. Or run your hands under the blanket over the hips, ribs, spine, etc if you don't have time for a blanket check. Double bonus of checking weight AND warming your hands.

    And horses burn calories in winter. That does NOT mean it's normal that non-feral horses lose weight during a hard winter. Just increase their forage. Simple. Increase calories in to replace calories used to warm the horse.

    And considering the horses WAS wearing a blanket that already aids keeping the horse warmer...how little was she feeding it?

    Owning and being responsible for multiple horses (a herd, not two) means a whole lot of extra time checking them over. It's easier and less time to just chuck hay once in a while and check water. But if you want an easy, less time consuming job in a climate controlled area...get the hell out of equine care. It's a very well known fact: Running an equine business entails hard work, outdoor conditions, a lot of money in feed/vet care/supplies and a very conscientious owner with experience and knowledge.
    It is NOT just fun stuff like making more baby horsies, lessons, shows, etc.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    3 members found this post helpful.

  10. #90
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    May. 5, 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by tabula rashah View Post
    Okay- I have no dog in this fight at all. But I do want to say that I know Aspenlucas personally as we went to college together back in the 90's. Her horses that she kept at school were always very well taken care of and she was quite the rider. .
    Wouldn't the college insist on proper care and most colleges are in charge of the feeding program?
    Come to the dark side, we have cookies


    6 members found this post helpful.

  11. #91
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pennywell Bay View Post
    Wouldn't the college insist on proper care and most colleges are in charge of the feeding program?
    For the most part yes, but our horses all went home for breaks and summer and some of us who lived close enough and had multiple horse would trade out which horse was kept in our boarding spot at school
    “While the rest of the species is descended from apes, redheads are descended from cats.” Mark Twain



  12. #92
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    Aug. 30, 2005
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    Up and down the west coast!
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    Quote Originally Posted by harnessphoto View Post
    Just adding to the old =/= skinny thought. This guy was FORTY-FIVE when this photo was taken:
    http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-xNaAY1VLd-...0/IMG_3411.JPG
    Yep. It is not rocket science. The main ingredient in keeping an old horse fat is water...soak the food so they can chew it. Great job!


    5 members found this post helpful.

  13. #93
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    Feb. 6, 2003
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    Tabula...sadly this happens semi-regularly with well known posters on this (and other) BBs.

    Folks who have been to their places and/or knew them personally and yet they had dead/dying horses or neglected animals, etc.
    Colored Cowhorse, PintoPiaffe, GrayFoxFarm, Norcrest, etc.

    Not to mention the many who weren't Coth regulars who also had folks who knew them in the past and hadn't realized how far they'd slipped in terms of care. Like Beth Hoskins and Marsha Parkinson.

    (and no, nobody wants to hear from Leo that Marsha was framed/whatever)


    It's sad. Especially when they used to be "normal" and to see how far they've slipped. And denied any problems while hiding the reality. Or possibly not even seeing it themselves.


    And that's still not taking into account those who weren't abusing horses but still screwing people over like CosMonster and Spacely. All under the umbrella of friendship.
    You jump in the saddle,
    Hold onto the bridle!
    Jump in the line!
    ...Belefonte


    6 members found this post helpful.

  14. #94
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    Feb. 14, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by Long Spot View Post
    Further proof that if anyone ever has any questions about caring for the thin, the infirmed, the old...anything...there are plenty of people here on this board who really know what they are doing and most likely happy to share their knowledge and experience.

    There is no excuse. None.
    Exactly.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  15. #95
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    Oct. 6, 2002
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    Philadelphia PA
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    45? I am more envious than I care to admit. My guy is 24 and starting to suddenly look creakier than I ever saw before Super super envious!
    ~Veronica
    "The Son Dee Times" "Sustained" "Somerset" "Franklin Square"
    http://photobucket.com/albums/y192/vxf111/



  16. #96
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    Oct. 25, 2007
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    people can snap, I have personally seen it happen.
    Fine horse owner running a stable, next thing you know, not cleaning, not feeding, threatening to burn the barn down, letting horses out of their stalls at night, with barn near a major highway. People can snap, and the sad thing is they don't think they are doing anything wrong!!!
    I didn't clean the stalls yesterday, forgetting to mention the day before and the month before that too.

    I think a mentally ill person is the only kind of person who can starve, endanger an animal or child. I also think they don't get it.
    No excuse for them, it is my way of coping/processing how someone could do that and before they sink into their abyss, seek help.

    This really disturbs me that she 'rescued' this horse from the feedlot, and then slowly starved the poor thing. I am totally anti slaughter, but really, this would have been better for this horse than a slow starvation.

    Watching the video, and hearing your interaction with her tabula, only makes me think, aspenlucas is mentally ill and in denial about her actions.

    A horse who is starved, may die from re-feeding syndrome. This we know. We also know this did not happen immediately but over some period of time. So, the horse was being fed, just not enough.
    God rest the horse, and aspen, I do hope you are reading this. Get some help, by admitting what you have done, not to us, but to the prosecution. Don't do this to an animal again.
    In hindsight, I recalled aspen maria talking about her goat problems, and it not adding up...But, I did not think she was starving her animals.

    I only mentioned the tape measure in case there are people who can't see a horse is gaining/losing weight. The tape measure takes the guess work out.
    Last edited by fivehorses; Aug. 15, 2013 at 05:34 PM. Reason: too lengthy before!
    save lives...spay/neuter/geld


    3 members found this post helpful.

  17. #97
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by fivehorses View Post
    people can snap, I have personally seen it happen.
    Fine horse owner running a stable, next thing you know, not cleaning, not feeding, threatening to burn the barn down, letting horses out of their stalls at night, with barn near a major highway. People can snap, and the sad thing is they don't think they are doing anything wrong!!!
    I didn't clean the stalls yesterday, forgetting to mention the day before and the month before that too.

    I think a mentally ill person is the only kind of person who can starve, endanger an animal or child. I also think they don't get it.
    No excuse for them, it is my way of coping/processing how someone could do that and before they sink into their abyss, seek help.

    This really disturbs me that she 'rescued' this horse from the feedlot, and then slowly starved the poor thing. I am totally anti slaughter, but really, this would have been better for this horse than a slow starvation.

    Watching the video, and hearing your interaction with her tabula, only makes me think, aspenlucas is mentally ill and in denial about her actions.

    A horse who is starved, may die from re-feeding syndrome. This we know. We also know this did not happen immediately but over some period of time. So, the horse was being fed, just not enough.
    God rest the horse, and aspen, I do hope you are reading this. Get some help, by admitting what you have done, not to us, but to the prosecution. Don't do this to an animal again.
    In hindsight, I recalled aspen maria talking about her goat problems, and it not adding up...But, I did not think she was starving her animals.

    I only mentioned the tape measure in case there are people who can't see a horse is gaining/losing weight. The tape measure takes the guess work out.
    I completely agree. I had a very close personal friend with a lovely boarding barn. Following her divorce and mother's ultimately fatal illness, she snapped. She went off the rails, started partying more and riding less, and left horses to starve, colic, and wander the driveway loose.

    I wound up seizing and rehabbing one of the boarded horses, who was on death's door and nearly didn't make it, and she painted ME as the bad guy.

    Years later, I was contacted by a newly dumped boyfriend of hers who she was painting as a monster. Seems she is in desperate need of mental help and is no closer to getting it than she was when I saw her last.

    What blew MY mind about that situation was the long list of people who defended her... including some whose own horses had suffered at her hands. I knew several boarders who left her facility and students who quit lessons with her, but she retained enough people to stay afloat financially. Despite multiple calls to the SPCA from many sources, she remained open for business.

    I understand loyalty and concern for an individual. It broke my heart when the friendship was lost in the process. But the line was black and white for me. You do not starve and abuse animals. End of story in my book.


    10 members found this post helpful.

  18. #98
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    Mar. 10, 2007
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    We have a 33 year old Morgan that DH has had for 32 years now (good investments, those Morgans) and she's as fat and sassy as ever...

    We had some sort of weird issue go through our horses last winter and still don't know what it was.. a parasite or virus or what, but most of them dropped off to a less than optimum weight and nobody could figure out why... when I think of how hard we fought to put the weight back on, how much money we spent and how many hours I spent on the internet...?? While I was sick with pertussis and DH was unemployed but the horses were our mission...
    When it is as simple as feed the poor thing... and you don't? Thankfully all ours pulled out of it and are totally healthy and happy now... I am tempted all the time to swoop up the horses that need someone to just feed them something...

    For shame.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #99
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    Quote Originally Posted by harnessphoto View Post
    I completely agree. I had a very close personal friend with a lovely boarding barn. Following her divorce and mother's ultimately fatal illness, she snapped. She went off the rails, started partying more and riding less, and left horses to starve, colic, and wander the driveway loose.

    I wound up seizing and rehabbing one of the boarded horses, who was on death's door and nearly didn't make it, and she painted ME as the bad guy.

    Years later, I was contacted by a newly dumped boyfriend of hers who she was painting as a monster. Seems she is in desperate need of mental help and is no closer to getting it than she was when I saw her last.

    What blew MY mind about that situation was the long list of people who defended her... including some whose own horses had suffered at her hands. I knew several boarders who left her facility and students who quit lessons with her, but she retained enough people to stay afloat financially. Despite multiple calls to the SPCA from many sources, she remained open for business.

    I understand loyalty and concern for an individual. It broke my heart when the friendship was lost in the process. But the line was black and white for me. You do not starve and abuse animals. End of story in my book.
    The world needs more people like you!


    2 members found this post helpful.

  20. #100
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    Mar. 14, 2002
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    Quote Originally Posted by fivehorses View Post
    ...
    This really disturbs me that she 'rescued' this horse from the feedlot, and then slowly starved the poor thing. I am totally anti slaughter, but really, this would have been better for this horse than a slow starvation...
    Just saw on Facebook that she got a lot of horses from AC4H. Back in April, she posted on Facebook that she "saved" 30 horses from them and currently had "many" of them at her barn:
    https://www.facebook.com/permalink.p...al_comments=61
    Equus Keepus Brokus



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