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  1. #21
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    OP, have you contacted the rescue that the cat originally came from? (I'm assuming it was a rescue because you said that it was rescued, and received shots and supposedly its sterilization. I suppose it could have been received from an individual not a group).
    If it was an actual rescue group, they absolutely must be held financially accountable for this. Mistakes happen of course, but if the rescue cares at ALL about their mission and purpose, they'd be falling over themselves trying to right the wrong. That would be through treating your home like a foster home and providing you with all the things they normally provide to adoptable pets. All pre and post natal care for mama, shots and sterilization of the kittens, usually food and supplies (litter, bedding for the whelping box, etc).
    I'm so conflicted in hoping there was a rescue involved here with mama cat. On one hand it would help you out so much with the costs and networking, but on the other hand I would hate to know there was a rescue that let such a huge oversight happen.

    If there wasn't, you can still reach out to rescue groups in your area for help in networking the kittens the perhaps getting them in the system as fosters with one group in particular. When contacting groups for help, explain how the situation arose. Include the absolute cutest darn photo you can capture of mama cat, and if the kittens have arrived, photos and descriptions of them too. Ask if you could be their foster home with the group until the kittens are adopted. If they say they can't take on the expenses of another litter right now, offer to partially sponsor them (or fully if you're able). This will at least get you in their network, online bios, at adoption events, and circulated on Facebook or emails. Some groups may just offer to do courtesy listings online. Those are helpful too. (fostering directly is the best since you can then bring them to events for the public to fall in love with them. I know our group cannot allow people with their own animals to be rehomed sit with us at events for legal reasons. The animals at the events have to be property of our rescue group- our lawyer and the petstore lawyers insist.)

    Good luck with them. As far as actual pre birth tips, mama cat prison sounds like the easiest way. Does your vet know how much longer you will be waiting?
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  2. #22
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Florida
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    Bits-

    There was not an actual rescue...A man that goes to our church found Katie out in the woods, mama cat dead, no other kittens to be found. He brought her to church that Sunday, and put her in a box by the door. Clever So that's how my sis-in-law ended up with her, and she got the shots through their vet. You'd have to know my SIL, but I'd be willing to bet she just wasn't paying attention, had some miscommunication, didn't realize what package she purchased, just assumed the cat got spayed. I love my in-laws, but they are not always "with it". Very air headed and easily distracted.

    To someone who asked how old she was...she is still young but over a year old.

    Good idea about fostering them for a rescue, I'll have to get in touch with some here in town.



  3. #23
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    Nov. 25, 2005
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    MA
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    I'm all for spaying pregnant cats to avoid unwanted litters, but I do not think I could stomach spaying a cat with viable kittens. Making a decision that lets you sleep at night is important.

    I would say definitely keep her INDOORS ONLY throughout the birthing, mothering, weaning and until after the spay sutures are removed. A comfy, small area she is already comfortable in will be the best place for her to have kittens.

    When I helped some friends of mine trap/fix/adopt out some feral cats on their farm, the mom feral cats had their kittens in SUPER convenient places, like in the wall of the barn. You'd poke your head around the edge and look at them and all these little kittens would hiss at you. Thank god we managed to get them all!



  4. #24
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by Ruth0552 View Post
    When I helped some friends of mine trap/fix/adopt out some feral cats on their farm, the mom feral cats had their kittens in SUPER convenient places, like in the wall of the barn. You'd poke your head around the edge and look at them and all these little kittens would hiss at you. Thank god we managed to get them all!
    Thanks for the visual!!


    Hubby was saying keep her outside, because "she's a cat, cats in the wild do it all the time, bla bla bla". So keeping her inside is definitely the popular consensus?



  5. #25
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    I think keeping her inside would give the kittens a better chance at being properly socialized and all that stuff. It will also lower the risk of her getting pregnant again.


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #26
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    Not only would I keep her inside, I would keep her in a specific room where I want the kittens to spend their 8 weeks or so with you. I have a "foster" room set up which is a bedroom with a bathroom in my basement. Mama can come and go from bedroom to bathroom as she pleases but kittens are confined to the bathroom. First in the bathtub then once they can escape from that they are confined to the bathroom by a baby gate. Once they can climb that they get put in the crate but they are usually close to ready to go by that time.

    Mama handles their pee and poop in the beginning but once they start going on their own I use a cookie sheet as a litter box for the kittens as they are nowhere near big enough to climb into a normal one.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #27
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Florida
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    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    Mama handles their pee and poop in the beginning but once they start going on their own I use a cookie sheet as a litter box for the kittens as they are nowhere near big enough to climb into a normal one.
    Sorry, can you explain this?



  8. #28
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    Mar. 8, 2004
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    They can not go on their own so Mama licks them to stimulate them and eats it. If you have kittens without a Mama you have to take over that role with a paper towel that has been dipped in warm water that you wipe repeatedly over their hind end.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Ew. Nevermind please don't explain that....


    Seriously, though, good to know....had no idea!



  10. #30
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    May. 11, 2002
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    I honestly cannot wrap my head around you who are telling this person to have the mother spayed before she gives birth to the kittens. I could never in good conscience kill kittens because it was inconvenient for me. If I took the cat in and it was having kittens, those kittens would now be MY responsibility. No one else's. I would keep them, vacc them and s/n them and KEEP them. Why is it anyone else's responsibility to take them, especially with the over-population problem? I'd rather be the solution than a contributor. Couldn't live with myself otherwise. *shrugs*
    RIP Full Metal Jacket "Jack" 1998 -2/27/09
    RIP Salisbury Hill "Ted" 1979-4/2/10
    "God have mercy on the man who doubts what he's sure of" -Springsteen


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Fessy's Mom View Post
    I honestly cannot wrap my head around you who are telling this person to have the mother spayed before she gives birth to the kittens. I could never in good conscience kill kittens because it was inconvenient for me. If I took the cat in and it was having kittens, those kittens would now be MY responsibility. No one else's. I would keep them, vacc them and s/n them and KEEP them. Why is it anyone else's responsibility to take them, especially with the over-population problem? I'd rather be the solution than a contributor. Couldn't live with myself otherwise. *shrugs*
    Good for you.

    Though I can see some flaws with your logic.

    If a person can not house seven cats long term (lets say this cat has six kittens) then I suppose they should walk on by and do nothing with the pregnant cat in need?
    Last edited by trubandloki; Aug. 1, 2013 at 04:00 PM. Reason: bad typing skills


    2 members found this post helpful.

  12. #32
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    May. 11, 2002
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    I like your freudian slip.

    I'm just telling you what I would do. I don't pretend to know what might happen in a hundred different scenarios with other people. I just know that if I decided to keep a cat and this is what happened, I would keep them all.
    RIP Full Metal Jacket "Jack" 1998 -2/27/09
    RIP Salisbury Hill "Ted" 1979-4/2/10
    "God have mercy on the man who doubts what he's sure of" -Springsteen


    1 members found this post helpful.

  13. #33
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    When our dumped off barn cat had kittens, we got one of the big cardboard boxes from the grocery store - the kind that they use for pumpkins or watermelon - and used that as kittenland. Momcat could jump in and out, but kittens couldn't. We cleared out a place for them in the tackroom and put in a cat door, and 6? 7? 8? years later the family still lives there (without the cardboard box!).


    3 members found this post helpful.

  14. #34
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    Dec. 20, 2011
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    FYI: CLAY non-clump litter for the kittens when it gets to be around the time that they can go on their own -- they can give themselves cement booties with clumping/scoopable stuff if they a) go on themselves b) aren't too prompt getting out of the box after they go c) fall asleep while they're going.



    7 members found this post helpful.

  15. #35
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    Jan. 25, 2009
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    talkofthetown wrote:
    Hubby was saying keep her outside, because "she's a cat, cats in the wild do it all the time, bla bla bla". So keeping her inside is definitely the popular consensus?
    I would definitely confine her to a small indoor room to have the kittens. My experience with cats and kittens outside is that the mother cat will move the kittens and hide them from you, making it difficult to get the kittens friendly with humans. They can get really wild and scared by the time they are mobile, and then you have to confine them inside in order to tame them. If you keep them in a location where she can't hide them from you, they will grow up to be friendly with people. This will be key when it is time to find them good homes. He is right that she will be more than happy to have the babies outside, but I wouldn't really want her to because of socializing the kittens. Of course I would also make sure that whatever room you choose can be easily cleaned.
    Here is what I would advise you, in a nutshell. It will be more trouble to let her have the kittens, and if you do it right, it will take a lot more time and money. If you'd rather not get into all of that, then consider the spay.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    she's a cat, cat's do it in the wild all the time
    Cats in the wild also only have a life expectancy of 2-3 years.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  17. #37
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    Nov. 24, 2010
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    Quote Originally Posted by talkofthetown View Post
    That was one of my concerns:/ But I will definitely try to place each one rather than fill up an already full shelter. Our vet recommended not to, this late in her pregnancy, as it caused greater risk to the mother. And my conscience is already torn about that.
    Good for you, talkofthetown. Really. The idea of spay/abort just appalls me.
    I wish I lived near you. I would offer to give two of the kittens homes. Wish I could anyway, where I live, but I am already over my buildinq's quota (with the landlord's permission!).

    Please do NOT keep her outside! (I hope hubby will fall head over heels in love with the kittens once they're born!).
    RoanPonyMare


    2 members found this post helpful.

  18. #38
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    Jul. 28, 2004
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    I would have the mother spayed before she gives birth.

    I used to feel differently. Now I work as an ACO and part of my job is to perform euthanasia. So many people view cats as "disposable pets", dealing with all the unwanted cats and kittens has been the hardest part of my job.


    3 members found this post helpful.

  19. #39
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    Apr. 4, 2010
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    I know it's a personal decision, and the pluses for keeping the litter vs spay abort are that mama cat has a home, rather than being in animal control. The owner (op) can and should get the kittens all neutered before adoption, so the "results" of this breeding end with this generation. The kittens can also be socialized and have homes for them (preferably indoor due to wildlife, particularly bird, impact). Op should start looking ASAP for homes and network like mad. Here we have trouble adopting fully vetted kittens for 85 bucks (which does NOT cover their complete cost of care....).
    Our rescue group doesn't have a set rule about spay aborts. If the animal is early on, we'll usually have it done. Later pregnancies are up to the foster home, if they're willing and able to take on a litter. We're split on it about half would do it and half the foster homes wouldn't feel comfortable authorizing the procedure. (this is for healthy pregnant animals, we take vet advice if continuing with pregnancy would seriously jeopardize the health of the mom).

    I'm sorry the litter was dumped on you. Definitely look into becoming a foster home through a rescue group though!
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)



  20. #40
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    Oct. 12, 2001
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    Mama can and will breed the day after giving birth, so DO NOT leave her outside unless you want to own a perpetually pregnant cat and 40+ of her offspring.


    1 members found this post helpful.

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