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  1. #1
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    May. 28, 2006
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    Angry Lord Help Me....we're having kittens

    Long story short, my SIL and their family rescued a little kitten, got its' shots and everything, was planning on keeping it for their little girls. Then found out that the new apartment they were moving in to didn't allow cats. So we ended up with Katie. Some of you might remember her from this thread:
    http://www.chronofhorse.com/forum/sh...ighlight=katie

    Anyways, when we got her, we were informed that she had been spayed, along with her kitty shot package.

    You will NEVER guess what I'm about to type!

    So Miss Thing is now very large in her lower belly area, and now that my initial pissed off/freak out has worn off.....what do we do? I'm sure I'm making more of a big deal than it really is. I grew up on a QH breeding farm. DH used to be a vet tech. We've dealt with a littler of puppies. I am extremely familiar with the whole birthing process. I'm just a little wary because these guys will be so tiny...

    I know to expect that she will either have them in a VERY inconvenient place outside, or on something very loved and expensive and unwashable inside I know to expect that in litters, sometimes one or a few or all of them won't make it. I know that Mama will not have the babies if she feels stressed. What else do I need to know? And then what do I do with all these kittens?????



  2. #2
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    Jul. 19, 2003
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    Give her a box in a safe, quiet place that she may already like to hang out in. It should be quiet and stress free and cozy. And then, let her do her thing. The last time I had a litter of kittens, we had to move Mama and her first babies, but she got the point and stayed in her baby box after that. Obviously, having a good relationship with Mama helps A LOT.

    I would also suggest trying to keep places that she can crawl into but you can't shut up so she doesn't have them in a crawl space or wall!

    You WILL fall in love. It is a fact. You can not have a litter of kittens cavorting around and not just be totally head over heels. Start spreading the word NOW that you are expecting kittens. I ended up with TWO litter once (sister barn cats who we waited about a week too long to get spayed. Ugh). Every kitten survived (we had about 10 total, I think) and they all found homes. We took one back when he was about a year....he was not suited to house cat life!


    3 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Is a spay abort not an option? All I can think about are the numbers of cats and kittens being euthanized in animal controls around here after the minimum wait time is up (usually 72 hours). There's just not enough homes.

    Edited to add... If that's not an option, find out where this cat was rescued from. Inform them of their (huge) mistake of the cat not actually being spayed, and request their help in the vet costs and then the re-homing of the kittens when they're old enough. I can't imagine a rescue group allowing that oversight, especially when there IS such a huge homeless cat problem.
    (A decidedly unhorsey) MrB knocks over a feed bucket at the tack shop and mutters, "Oh crap. I failed the stadium jumping phase."
    (he does listen!)


    7 members found this post helpful.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by bits619 View Post
    Is a spay abort not an option? All I can think about are the numbers of cats and kittens being euthanized in animal controls around here after the minimum wait time is up (usually 72 hours). There's just not enough homes.
    That was one of my concerns:/ But I will definitely try to place each one rather than fill up an already full shelter. Our vet recommended not to, this late in her pregnancy, as it caused greater risk to the mother. And my conscience is already torn about that.


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  5. #5
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Every cat you place is one more cat at the shelter that gets euthanized...


    6 members found this post helpful.

  6. #6
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    Jan. 21, 2011
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    Seconding the recommendation to do an abortive spay.


    5 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by harnessphoto View Post
    Seconding the recommendation to do an abortive spay.
    It is a decision to make with your vet. Overpopulation is a terrible thing, but I am not sure I could do it if it is a risk and I was already attached.
    I would probably lock her in a room when she got close to her due date with the bottom of a plastic dog crate and old blankets and towels. I would also start spreading the word about the kittens. My own conscience wouldn't allow me to place them without them being 8 weeks old, vaccinated, dewormed, and altered. You may not be able to stop this litter, but you can stop the next ones.


    4 members found this post helpful.

  8. #8
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    Good point, Casey.

    I think this litter should be stopped but if the OP is not going to I agree that the kittens should all be altered before they are sent along to their new homes. Juvenile spay/neuter is a good thing in this situation.


    2 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by trubandloki View Post
    Every cat you place is one more cat at the shelter that gets euthanized...
    I don't understand this. Are you saying that finding a good home for the kittens is not possible?
    Libby

    There is a very fine line between "hobby" and "mental illness". - DAVE BARRY


    2 members found this post helpful.

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by INoMrEd View Post
    I don't understand this. Are you saying that finding a good home for the kittens is not possible?
    No, it means that each home she fills with her kittens is one less for the kittens in shelters.
    To the OP, I do tons of fostering for kittens with and without their Mama. The easiest way to handle it is to keep them in a bathtub. If that isn't possible then a kiddie pool works as well. Kittens are easy until they get to the super mobile stage then I put them in a crate. I vote terminal spay as well but can also understand why you may not be comfortable doing that.


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  11. #11
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    No, it means that each home she fills with her kittens is one less for the kittens in shelters.
    not necessarily. If she finds homes amongst people who wouldn't have even thought about going to a shelter for kittens- people who basically wouldn't have gotten a cat unless someone walked up to them and offered a kitten, of which there are many such people- then no homes have been taken away from the shelter kittens.


    11 members found this post helpful.

  12. #12
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    Thanks for the responses. I definitely see yall's point of view, I just really don't think I could do it. I will see what we can come up with to get a little area ready for her. She is already quite large, so I'm thinking it won't be too much longer. I've always heard the tongue in cheek remarks about how cats never choose the beds provided by their owners. Maybe if we lock her in the room she'll have no choice.


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  13. #13
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    Spay. I helped out at a trap and release spay/neuter clinic. Many pregnant cats, some days away from delivering, were spayed. I couldn't be present when they were spayed, but it has to be done.
    Against My Better Judgement: A blog about my new FLF OTTB
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  14. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by wendy View Post
    not necessarily. If she finds homes amongst people who wouldn't have even thought about going to a shelter for kittens- people who basically wouldn't have gotten a cat unless someone walked up to them and offered a kitten, of which there are many such people- then no homes have been taken away from the shelter kittens.
    And the kittens are already started, I'm not sure I would feel right about ending them depending on how far along they are. This is not a hypothetical litter of kittens, that a spay can prevent. Nor are they to be born in a shelter with no owner. If you want the kittens, then I would go ahead and let mama have them as long as an effort to find homes is found and the mother is spayed afterward.


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  15. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by INoMrEd View Post
    I don't understand this. Are you saying that finding a good home for the kittens is not possible?
    Laurie explained it well.

    Quote Originally Posted by Laurierace View Post
    No, it means that each home she fills with her kittens is one less for the kittens in shelters.

    I spent quite a bit of time at a shelter for good many years. Lots of kittens are put to sleep every year because there are just not enough homes. Yes, I said kittens. Not cats (those too are put to sleep). Cute fuzzy kittens.

    I personally could more easily deal with a late term spay than thinking about a litter of kittens being PTS at a shelter, that is all.

    I also understand the OP is the one who has to make the decision that works for them.


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  16. #16
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    Spay. I helped out at a trap and release spay/neuter clinic. Many pregnant cats, some days away from delivering, were spayed
    that's a completely different situation- you REALLY don't want a feral cat bringing more feral kittens into the world. If you catch a pregnant feral, it would be very irresponsible to just let her go again to have the kittens, and it would be very difficult to foster a feral until the kittens are weaned. And, sadly, no one is going to be heart-broken if a heavily pregnant feral female dies during high-risk spay surgery, vs. an owned and loved cat.



  17. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Casey09 View Post
    ...My own conscience wouldn't allow me to place them without them being 8 weeks old, vaccinated, dewormed, and altered. You may not be able to stop this litter, but you can stop the next ones.
    This.
    Equus Keepus Brokus


    3 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    I work at a feline spay/neuter clinic as a tech. I have seen late term abortive spays where the kittens were not yet viable and I assure you they are not 'kittens' as you know them. When done properly, an abortive spay is not really any riskier than a regular spay. You could lose a cat to bleeding or anesthesia even if the cat is NOT pregnant. That's not a reason NOT to spay. Additionally, birth itself is high risk and you could lose her if she DOES have the kittens. NOT having her spayed doesn't ensure her safety or survival either.

    I agree it's a decision that should be made by the OP and not by a message board, but it is a good option to CONSIDER. Just because one vet doesn't like to do it, doesn't mean it shouldn't be done.

    I 100% agree that the litter, should the OP decide to have them, needs to be tested, vaccinated, and altered before being adopted out. Nothing makes me quite as angry as giving away unaltered animals who then go on to feed the overpopulation problem. Pediatric s/n is not what it used to be and getting kittens done early is actually easier on them than getting done as adults. They recover faster and the procedures are easier. Most kittens are eating and playing within two hours of surgery.

    We s/n 200-300 cats PER MONTH at work and it never slows down. They are mostly from ONE COUNTY and it's just plain depressing to see.


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  19. #19
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    Some terminal spays may have kittens that aren't viable but lots of them do. They inject euthanasia solution into the umbilical cord. I don't know if they could estimate the term via ultrasound or not but that is beside the point since the OP isn't comfortable doing a terminal spay regardless of whether they are viable or not.

    I used to bring cats home from the race track that were more or less feral and let them have their kittens at my house. I probably should have had a terminal spay done but this way we got the fun of kittens in our house without adding to the population ourselves. I spayed Mama and returned them to the track after pawning the kittens off on my friends.


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  20. #20
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    How old is Katie? I'm hoping she's at least a year -- otherwise she might be too small to have them easily. I lost one of my heart cats due to this. She only had two kittens, but they were huge, and all three died after the emergency c-section. It broke my heart and I really don't want you to go through the same thing.

    Ask your vet what he thinks. Can you do an ultrasound to see how many kittens/how big they are, and have the vet evaluate her to see if he thinks she will be able to have them easily? I know cats have kittens all the time, but there are cases where it doesn't turn out well. I'm not a fan of late-term spay, and I definitely understand why you can't bring yourself to do it. But I think I would rather do that than lose another cat I loved.

    NOW. If the vet says she's fine, then make sure she has a quiet place to have them, socialize with them early on, be prepared for her to move them quite a bit if she's the nervous type and kiss your curtains good-bye. Oh, and think of names, because I guarantee you that if she only has a couple, they WILL be staying with you forever.



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