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  1. #101
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    Jun. 27, 2005
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    KY
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    Those Davis boots are just the cutest!

    He's probably going to get a little sore here and there from more "forced" (LOL) movement; perhaps even pop abscesses for some time.

    Hopefully soaking will help.

    You most certainly have a cute herd there.

    ************************
    \"Horses lend us the wings we lack\"



  2. #102
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    Apr. 1, 2003
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    Cocoa, Fla
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plainandtall View Post
    ...As for Spirit's fatness of lack therof- he has a very odd little pony body- his belly is very trim and tucked up- like a racehorse- but the fat is wadded up in odd clumps along his topline. His back is table like. He's probably about four inches LONGER than he should be- he tail head is imbedded between two butt cheeks that look more human than horse. The crest of his neck is thicker than my draft horse- I've got muscular not skinny legs- and the shape of his crest is a similar size and roundness as the biggest part of my calf...and it's dotted the length with lumps. I am crossing my fingers that he can lose weight without having that crest fall over when it deflates.
    If pony needs Pergolide for Cushings (fat in those places makes it sound like he might) Thriving Pets sells 2 months worth (60 days) of pills (you just put a single pill daily in their feed) for $56 (shipped) - very cost effective.
    Sandy in Fla.


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  3. #103
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    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    It will take several months for that hoof to heal, if not a whole year. Abscesses will drive you nuts but IME they are part of the process.

    LOVE the picture . SO glad he's a teacup size...I had to laugh when I saw size 00 but I really hoped they would get some use!

    Post as many pictures as possible, please .



  4. #104
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    May. 21, 2012
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    Thank for the tip on that Valentina- the vet didn't mention anything about cushings and I don't know that much about it to know if it goes hand in hand with the metabolic stuff- but I am glad I have that info in this thread if I need to look it up. I will say that this morning it seemed that Spirit was starting to grow his autumn coat- (his summer coat is IMHO very fine and healthy) but when I curried his this AM he was velvety and shedding like mad- maybe it was that 50 degree night last night.

    I just bought a bucket of "Remission" supplement (to prevent recurrence of laminitis) and got the OK from the vet that it can be paired with the hoof supplement I already have him on. The remission testimonials I read all mentioned very quick visible changes in reducing the crests on the horses- and many mentioned eye tearing (not a problem for Spirit) going away. I just thought it was interesting seemingly unrelated things that supplements can effect.

    Here is my latest little Spirit picture- working on his new pony size slow feed bag. I made it for him last night with lilac poly cord- it was a fun little craft project we'll see how it holds up.
    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater


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  5. #105
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    Sep. 2, 2005
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    Upstate NY
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plainandtall View Post
    I will say that this morning it seemed that Spirit was starting to grow his autumn coat- (his summer coat is IMHO very fine and healthy) but when I curried his this AM he was velvety and shedding like mad- maybe it was that 50 degree night last night.
    The days are getting shorter so their bodies are thinking it is time to shed.



  6. #106
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    May. 5, 2008
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    Glenelg, MD
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    OMG he is SO freakin cute!!!!!! So glad he has a wonderful new home with you.



  7. #107
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
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    So good to see all of this care for Spirit and I really thank you for that but please let us know what is happening with the other horses. Is there further networking that can be done? If so, I can help with that. I cannot get that collapsing barn and them out of my mind.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy


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  8. #108
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    May. 21, 2012
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    Calamber- Your post is uncannily connected... to where my heart is right now- I had a heart to heart with an aquantance yesterday who really put me on the spot about what is stopping me from doing something more (in terms of pressuring the people to do something or me doing something myself to get this ball rolling.)


    I was just on Bing Maps- I just had the crazy idea to look up the satellite view of that farm and see if I could see Spirit there. I could- and the way their bird's eye maps are- I could see many views with the horse herd in different places. Back then there were more horses, but I can see Spirit and the ones who are still there. It must have been a drought year- the pastures are scorched and there seems to be round bale "prints" where they were being fed... but the junk... Oh my goodness- there is just crap and debris everywhere- no rhyme or reason- just all over the place. The barn looks literally- like tornado damage. I't so dangerous and extends much further than I'd realized.

    I will make some phone calls and see what I can learn. Thank you for offering to help network.

    A sad picture looking back to some other year: Spirit with his old herd living in a dangerous field/barn: http://i16.photobucket.com/albums/b2...itsoldfarm.jpg


    A happy picture looking forward- Put in a big effort yesterday to put in a gate and a stout hitch rail next to the barn which is also a segment of fencing for the pony pen. I notched the rail out log cabin style and bolted it in with countersunk bolts and ground down all the splintery corners and cut off the bolt ends for safety... it came out really nice. My husband did the one part I could not do- digging the post holes by hand with our new post hole diggers (which I had to go to town and get after discovering--- would you believe that... remember the disasterous brief bushhog excursion?... yeah that... well right about the same moment he was tearing the boards off Sprocket's dutch door top- he was also hitting the old fence post diggers that had been leaned against the door to prop it open.) It's like Mr. Bean on a tractor I swear.

    Originally I was thinking to finish under the rail with fence boards- but I realized that this pen, being almost entirely obstructed from the view from the house by the bulk of the barn- this little end provides a view that I think I'd miss (as a compulsive checker) I think instead I will use hog panel.

    https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?f...type=1&theater
    Last edited by Plainandtall; Aug. 15, 2013 at 10:41 PM.


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  9. #109
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    May. 21, 2012
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    Update on the other horses:

    Today I got permission to go back to the farm and check on them. This time I brought grain.

    Great news #1- I was able to feed all of them from my hand. I wasn't able to get cuddly and touch them on their bodies- but I was able to entice them to approach me (granted I wasn't holding a halter or leadrope so I was presenting no threat) But they were not as "wild" as I had originally thought. So I believe that they can probably be caught without needing a helicopter, a tranq gun or a lasso.

    great news #2- The horse who had been limping was not limping anymore. I'm going to guess it was an abscess which has blown out. Because they were in the mucky barn at first- and feet were muddy- and I couldn't see much- but he was a MUCH healthier horse. (after seeing that heartwrenching vid from the Polish breeding farm- my fears driving over there were through the roof. I was sooo relieved!)

    good news #3- I was able to take some pictures of them... craigslisty yes. (as they are milling around the grain I'd dumped on the ground)- but still- much better to get a picture of them. I'll load them up pronto.

    I spent about 1/2 hour pulling some beams and planks and roof metal out of the mud in the barn. That was pretty gross- I didn't bring gloves- but it was satisfying. Don't get me wrong- it's still horrible- but at least I was able to clear the main path they walk in and out and take out some obstacles they were having to climb over. It's just plain stupid that I was able to do that much in a half hour. If a person or three just spent one afternoon and a case of beer- the situation *inside* could be made safe.


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  10. #110
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    May. 21, 2012
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    This should start you at a position in the slideshow to see the new pictures- by going "previous" it should take you through about 12 pictures.

    The other 3 horses

    I don't think the above link worked right- Here is the start of the Spirit slideshow- and currently the other horses are the first ones.
    http://s16.photobucket.com/user/frog...slideshow/pony



  11. #111
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    May. 4, 2006
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    Seabeck - the soggy peninsula
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    That is a lovely head shot of the black horse. Please continue on, I will try and help you if I can. That is so ridiculous that they just don't make some kind of clean up party of it. The barn looks like one good huff or puff and down it comes. Thank you for following up. Do you think we could start posting somewhere for them? Any ideas of a grouping in the area who might help?

    BTW, good news about the formerly limping horse, that helps.
    "When written in Chinese, the word "crisis" is composed of two characters, one represents danger, the other represents opportunity."

    John F Kennedy



  12. #112
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    Feb. 15, 2004
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    Ontario
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    Do they have a constant access to water? a creek? they would clean up nicely. I am amazed the white on them still looks white!!


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  13. #113
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    Sep. 6, 2012
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    Moved South from North Pole
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    Oh it was great of you to go back and check on the other horses. Someone should get them since they aren't wild as you thought before.

    spirit is going to be a real character. Thank you for saving Spirit.



  14. #114
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    May. 21, 2012
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    Water- yes, they have a pond. We tend to not have super cold winters here and ponds don't usually develop much ice- but if there was a super cold snap the ice/ quest for water could be a major danger.

    I agree they were amazingly clean and BRIGHT white except for the ankles down. Their skin seems pretty healthy... I know sometimes you discover more as you dig in and get closer- but they look great. There is a burr situation though-the geldings mane and tail is a solid mat and I think the mare may have lost her forelock by burrs.



  15. #115
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    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    They are FAT aren't they? It sounds like the lack of grooming, handling, and dangers in the paddock are the most serious issues for them. Very sad, because I love to spoil and love on my horses, so I feel sad for those who don't get that. But the lurking danger when that barn finally goes is what would keep me awake at night. It was so kind of you to put in the effort to clear their path, but what will come of them? What does the owner want to do with them? Do they understand the risks of founder?

    While it could be worse eventually, I still feel sad that they are just subsisting.



  16. #116
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    May. 21, 2012
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    Yes- they are fat- (the spotted gelding seems like a nice reasonable weight) but I don't think AC is going to start writing people up for fat horses. When people see a skinny horse they think OMG how awful... but I just don't think that these round handsome horses are going to inspire a rescue cavalry to hitch up the trailers and come rolling in to save the day.

    I guess this is a whole other thread- but these horses seem to be stuck in a limboland of their potential market which seems to me to be the rescue world and the regular old horse market. And neither market is going to get all hot under the collar to get their hands on them except for the market who likes their fatness the best.

    I don't know who in the family actually owns the horses, who ultimately has the say so on if and where they go and at what price, and I think they either don't know or are purposly avoiding claiming or naming any one person to keep it all shifty. I think they would all be happy to have them gone so it was one less thing to worry about- but I don't know if anyone is hanging on to ideas that they have $ value- or if they have (even if it's of the hoarder type) emotional attachment to them or their role on the farm.

    If there is anyone interested in one or more of these horses I will help put you in contact with someone in the family.

    As for the barn- yes- I didn't really mean that it would be a safe barn... I just meant that the horses would not be facing serious injury every time they turn around. Really- I didn't mean SAFE. It's wierd- when you are there- your focus is really tight- you are in tall weeds and having to watch every step where you are going to put your foot down- you can't even really see the barn even when you are right there- and once you are inside the barn- you can't see all of it at the same time. But looking at this photo here... no, an afternoon of hard work and a case of beer.. is NOT going to make this safe.



  17. #117
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    Nov. 16, 2004
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    NE Indiana
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    Wow, that's just insane. A good straight wind and....well...



  18. #118
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    May. 21, 2012
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    I am always forgetting to turn my camera sideways when I take videos! DOH.

    Anyway- The farrier came out on Friday morning to see if he could help Spirit with the abscess- he was pretty sure that's what it was- but after paring around a little and hoof testing- there just wasn't one point that was looking like a target- so we just decided to back off and let it be. Saturday morning Spirit wasn't ouchy anymore. Nothing blew out above- and I can't see anything at the sole area either unless it's way deep in the collateral groove by the frog.

    Do abscesses ever wax and wane without blowing out? I haven't dealt with too many- but I could always see the point where they drained and gave relief.

    Anyway- today there seemed to be a shift in herd dynamics- and it was like a big sigh of resignation from the others... "Why are we trying to fight off this little bugger- he doesn't seem to be getting the point- I don't think he's much bother- maybe we should just let him be a part of the herd." They aren't quite buddy buddy yet- but it was enough of a change that I knew that when I called them to come in out of the sun and away from the flies- that I could count on Spirit being a part of the gang. Sprocket started running to me before I was anywhere near the gate.... I wasn't where I wanted to be with the camera yet.

    Watch with sound on for full draft horse a-comin' effect!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXSfj...ature=youtu.be



  19. #119
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    Jun. 27, 2005
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    KY
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    You have such a cute herd there.
    Before we know it, Spirit will be standing underneath your draft's rump for shade.

    ************************
    \"Horses lend us the wings we lack\"



  20. #120
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    Oct. 25, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plainandtall View Post
    I am always forgetting to turn my camera sideways when I take videos! DOH.

    Anyway- The farrier came out on Friday morning to see if he could help Spirit with the abscess- he was pretty sure that's what it was- but after paring around a little and hoof testing- there just wasn't one point that was looking like a target- so we just decided to back off and let it be. Saturday morning Spirit wasn't ouchy anymore. Nothing blew out above- and I can't see anything at the sole area either unless it's way deep in the collateral groove by the frog.

    Do abscesses ever wax and wane without blowing out? I haven't dealt with too many- but I could always see the point where they drained and gave relief.

    Anyway- today there seemed to be a shift in herd dynamics- and it was like a big sigh of resignation from the others... "Why are we trying to fight off this little bugger- he doesn't seem to be getting the point- I don't think he's much bother- maybe we should just let him be a part of the herd." They aren't quite buddy buddy yet- but it was enough of a change that I knew that when I called them to come in out of the sun and away from the flies- that I could count on Spirit being a part of the gang. Sprocket started running to me before I was anywhere near the gate.... I wasn't where I wanted to be with the camera yet.

    Watch with sound on for full draft horse a-comin' effect!
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXSfj...ature=youtu.be
    Abcesses certainly DO wax and wane without ever (visibly) blowing out--when they get near the blood supply, often the horse's immune system goes to work on it (sometimes you'll get a stocked-up leg or low-grade fever) and it'll seem to disappear overnight. Oftentimes they'll also "blow" either in the cleft of the frog, or so far up the heel that you'll think it's just part of the frog itself and miss it.

    They are the most common sequel to laminitic events, and that fella's feet have a lot of remodeling to do. You're probably going to see more than one "toothache in his heel," but remind yourself nobody ever died of one however painful they look. Soaking in Epsom salts still does about as much as anything--I love those Davis boots for that!

    I've seen waaaaaaaaay worse feet and worse movers here in Pony Hunter Heaven and the vast majority recovered to jump again, at least as schoolmasters and hacks, so I see no reason whatsoever not to start that little cutie in harness as soon as he's "4 on the floor" again! They're so smart he'll be much happier with a "job," and one that doesn't require weight on his back is made to order!

    He's gonna be cute as a BUG!!!



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