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  1. #1
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    Jan. 5, 2011
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    Default deep thoughts on organ donation

    Until my father died last month and we donated his organs, I never thought of these things. Maybe these will be helpful to someone.

    When organs are donated, there is no climactic scene where you extubate the patient and wait for the heart to stop beating. The heart will keep beating until the organs are taken. I’m not sure if missing that part of death is a good thing or a bad thing, though I lean towards “bad.”
    It occurred to me this week that if someone has a Do Not Intubate order in their health care directives, they would never be able to be an organ donor.
    Since I work in a hospital, I’m finding it very depressing each time we get the “comfort care at the end of life” orders—since that is one more person whose organs will not be donated. Same with “Extubate patient when family is ready.” (Of course, some of these patients may be excluded from organ donation due to their disease states anyway.)


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  2. #2
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    I signed up to be an organ donor the exact year I was allowed to. (18 in ma.) I hope they strip me clean, what am I going to use them for!?!


    16 members found this post helpful.

  3. #3
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    Sep. 7, 2009
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    Lexington, KY
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    I would if I could, but I have Babesia and I cannot donate blood or organs.
    Join the Clinton 2016 campaign...Hillary For America. https://www.hillaryclinton.com/



  4. #4
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    Jan. 17, 2008
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    My thoughts are such!

    1. The brain has been declared dead. The heart does keep beating, but I just consider it electrical activity, not life!

    2. Not everyone that dies is qualified for organ donation. Frequently serious brain injuries and the patient is intubated under emergency circumstances. Healthcare directives can be over ridden by family. So, it can be done!

    3. Having been involved in several Organ Procurements, I don't care if you take my parts after I die, but I will not receive an organ from someone else.

    4. Not knowing what is involved in organ donation is a good thing! I don't like these cases, at all! I have seen things that make me question the ethics involved.
    Life is too short to argue with a mare! Just don't engage! It is much easier that way!

    Have fun, be safe, and let the mare think it is her idea!


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  5. #5
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    Jan. 27, 2002
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    i too was an organ donor as soon as i was able, but a few years ago dh and i donated our bodies to the local medical school.
    we were both so disgusted with the funeral home scene that we looked for a way to avoid that and found that uvm had a real need for human cadavers for their students.
    all we had to do was get the body to the school after death and they would use it for two years and then cremate the remains. the school gives the family the ashes and keeps a memorial garden for donors, who are very highly regarded by their students.


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  6. #6
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    Sep. 2, 2008
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    Greeley, Colorado
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    I'm going to play the Devil's Advocate here. I think organ donation is a wonderful thing, however, I hear horror stories about doctors not trying as hard to save a patient who is an organ donor. Because of this, I am not an organ donor on my license but it is written into my will. I leave that choice up to my loved one.
    **Friend of bar.ka**

    Fils Du Reverdy (Revy)- 1993 Selle Francais Gelding
    My equine soulmate


    4 members found this post helpful.

  7. #7
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    Dec. 26, 2011
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    CT
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    Quote Originally Posted by dani0303 View Post
    I'm going to play the Devil's Advocate here. I think organ donation is a wonderful thing, however, I hear horror stories about doctors not trying as hard to save a patient who is an organ donor. Because of this, I am not an organ donor on my license but it is written into my will. I leave that choice up to my loved one.
    This is why I'm not either.
    Please support S. 1406 to amend the Horse Protection Act and Prevent all Soring Tactics to the Tennessee Walking horse!
    https://www.popvox.com/bills/us/113/s1406



  8. #8
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    Sep. 4, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by dani0303 View Post
    I'm going to play the Devil's Advocate here. I think organ donation is a wonderful thing, however, I hear horror stories about doctors not trying as hard to save a patient who is an organ donor.
    I call BS on this. Physicians HATE to lose patients. Hate it. The idea that one would not try as hard to save an organ donor patient is ludicrous.


    48 members found this post helpful.

  9. #9
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    Dec. 12, 2004
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    Massachusetts
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    Here's a Snope s article about why that's silly: http://www.snopes.com/medical/emergent/donor.asp

    If you're brain dead, you're brain dead.


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  10. #10
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    Mar. 30, 2009
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    CA to Costa Rica to WI
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    Before I moved I gave my mom power of attorney. I was NOT prepared for the line where I have to decide if I want them to sustain my life if anything happens. (I'm only 23!)

    But I was very clear with my mom about what I want. I'm young and my organs are healthy as of now. My body could do a lot of good after my passing and that's way more valuable than me taking up bed space for years to come.

    Hopefully it won't come to that anytime soon.
    Proud member of the "I'm In My 20's and Hope to Be a Good Rider Someday" clique

    Fourteen Months Living and Working in Costa Rica


    3 members found this post helpful.

  11. #11
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    Jul. 13, 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by NoSuchPerson View Post
    I call BS on this. Physicians HATE to lose patients. Hate it. The idea that one would not try as hard to save an organ donor patient is ludicrous.
    I agree that doctors probably aren't out there dialing back on their efforts because a patient has nice, juicy organs and is a donor. But I've also seen some behavior by medical professionals that makes me less than enthusiastic about organ donation - doctors may hate to lose a patient, but many also hate to "waste" their time on certain patients who seem less rewarding or more difficult to treat - the very old, the chronically ill, etc. These patients may not be ideal organ donors, but the attitudes are revealing.


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  12. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by vacation1 View Post
    I agree that doctors probably aren't out there dialing back on their efforts because a patient has nice, juicy organs and is a donor. But I've also seen some behavior by medical professionals that makes me less than enthusiastic about organ donation - doctors may hate to lose a patient, but many also hate to "waste" their time on certain patients who seem less rewarding or more difficult to treat - the very old, the chronically ill, etc. These patients may not be ideal organ donors, but the attitudes are revealing.
    One has nothing to do with the other and I'm not sure why you would try to link these two entirely different topics.


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  13. #13
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    Jun. 7, 2002
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    I chose "organ donor" on my license. I like the idea of thinking I might be able to help someone else after I die.
    Ottbs - The finish line is only the beginning!


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  14. #14
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    I have some interesting birth defects, my heart especially and so the local medical college will get my body, if they can.

    My cardiologist and I tease about how interesting it would be to see the face of the medical student trying to make anatomical sense of my heart.

    I hope that what someone learns from me may help make them better at caring for those that will be their patients, just as others helped make my doctors the good doctors they are for me.


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  15. #15
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    Jul. 3, 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by dani0303 View Post
    I'm going to play the Devil's Advocate here. I think organ donation is a wonderful thing, however, I hear horror stories about doctors not trying as hard to save a patient who is an organ donor. Because of this, I am not an organ donor on my license but it is written into my will. I leave that choice up to my loved one.
    I am sorry, but that is patently ridiculous. For more reasons than I could even list.
    Do you think the paramedics check your card & then tell the doc as they wheel you in??

    I can't believe that anyone in 2013 actually thinks this.


    25 members found this post helpful.

  16. #16
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    Mar. 23, 2005
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    Quote Originally Posted by dani0303 View Post
    Because of this, I am not an organ donor on my license but it is written into my will. I leave that choice up to my loved one.
    By the time anybody takes a look at your will, it will be too late to donate any organs. You'll be long gone. Better to let those close to you know of your wishes.

    (I'd rather be an organ donor than a med student's cadaver. I've seen bodies laid out for study and, while I totally understand the value, that is not how I want to end up.)


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  17. #17
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    Jan. 4, 2007
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    TX
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    Quote Originally Posted by RainyDayRide View Post
    By the time anybody takes a look at your will, it will be too late to donate any organs. You'll be long gone. Better to let those close to you know of your wishes.

    (I'd rather be an organ donor than a med student's cadaver. I've seen bodies laid out for study and, while I totally understand the value, that is not how I want to end up.)
    I told my Dr I was going to tattoo in the appropriate place "this side up".


    5 members found this post helpful.

  18. #18
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    Jan. 5, 2011
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    Quote Originally Posted by Hippolyta View Post
    I am sorry, but that is patently ridiculous. For more reasons than I could even list.
    Do you think the paramedics check your card & then tell the doc as they wheel you in??
    I can't believe that anyone in 2013 actually thinks this.
    Actually, the folks at the hospital knew of my father's status before we did (that he signed up to be a donor.) Apparently there's an online list they can access.
    I had no doubt that my father was really brain dead. It was disconcerting to Google brain death and read a couple of alleged cases where people declared brain dead did wake up.
    I did want to bring to attention that being DNI status would probably prevent you from donating organs. My father's heart stopped twice, if he'd been DNR his organs wouldn't have been usable. Food for thought.


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  19. #19
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    Feb. 25, 2011
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    So California
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    I had a loved one who died and the family decided to donate organs, in the absence of information about what the loved one would have wanted. One of the family did not want anything to go to research, universities or to any place or purpose other than direct transfer to another ailing person, which was fine. I did not want anything used for elective plastic surgery. Specifically, the idea of someone walking around with duck lips or plumped up cheeks thanks to my loved one was a particularly repellent idea.

    I am an organ donor myself. I would be fine with having my body used for research, duck lips, whatever, but I would never, ever do this again with a loved one. The idea of this person, whom I loved dearly, having the still beating heart removed, is a mental image that haunts me and disturbs me still, and although you can assert that no doctor would ever do anything unethical, well, that's just ridiculous, naive, and untrue. Just as in the rest of the populace, there are doctors who are sociopaths, and there are doctors who are arrogant, and there are doctors who are careless. It has happened that people declared brain dead have been diagnosed in error. I won't take that responsibility and that decision upon myself again.

    I am not making up stories about medical errors. This Wall Street Journal article by Dr. Marty Makary,

    http://blogs.wsj.com/ideas-market/20...overtreatment/,

    rates "preventable harm as the number 3 cause of death in the U.S. after cardiovascular disease and cancer." That means mistakes. (Pubmed disagrees with the numbers but my point is that medical mistakes are a huge problem).


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  20. #20
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    May. 8, 2006
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    Northern Indiana
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    I am very much for organ and tissue donation, but do not have the heart on my license. The reason for this is that in the state of Indiana, a heart is the same as a signed consent form and, as their website states it, "no one can interfere with your decision to donate" -- also known as, if my husband wants to grieve after my brain death, the state has the right to take my body away from him and remove said organs as I had already given consent. I am SO no cool with that -- my family knows my wishes and I have every ounce of trust in them to follow those wishes.

    Another thing to consider (if anyone already hasn't) is tissue donation. Even those who cannot donate organs can still donate things like their corneas, heart valves, skin, tendons, ligaments, bones, etc. It's a beautiful thing to pass on and even those who are ineligible for heart/lung/kidney/liver still have the opportunity to live on through their gift.
    To be loved by a horse should fill us with awe, for we hath not deserved it.



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