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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jun. 12, 2009
    Posts
    435

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    I will also second the idea that you horse should not be throwing shoes like that. In my opinion and experience, your horse should be able to keep shoes on for 6 weeks. My horse who had never had problems started having trouble keeping shoes on and as soon as I switched farriers, the issue was resolved.

    I have lived several places so here is what I have paid for 4 steel shoes with clips and some modifications (natural balance or squared toe behind).

    PNW - $140 for old farrier and $95 for current farrier (he's only been out of school for a little over two years but he's quite good)

    IN - $140 for AWESOME farrier (this farrier has actually written for COTH magazine and Smartpak), $100 for ok farrier

    CT - $140 for decent farrier (farrier was very well known but I was never super impressed)
    "Be the change you want to see in the world."
    ~Mahatma Gandhi



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Dec. 20, 2009
    Posts
    2,920

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    In Florida (not wellington) I pay $180 for 4 comfort shoes, that require some tinkering to get the support my mare needs. Steel, last thru several resets. Mare is on a 4 week schedule because her feet grow so darn fast. Resets are around $150
    We don't get less brave; we get a bigger sense of self-preservation........



  3. #23
    Join Date
    Feb. 9, 2000
    Posts
    2,188

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    Just had one done yesterday - 4 new shoes with clips - $175.

    My other horse with the trainer is $400, whether they are in Wellington or the east coast. No special shoes on him either.

    Just for comparison, my entire bill for my three horses at home (the above mentioned 4 shoes, plus one with shoes with rim pads in front, barefoot behind, and one barefoot all around) was only $360!



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Feb. 4, 2009
    Location
    NCC DE
    Posts
    2,099

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    $240.00 for all 4, every 5 weeks. Steel with side clips, pads in the front. Hot shod, new shoes each time.

    Worth every penny.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jan. 17, 2008
    Location
    New England
    Posts
    1,949

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    $140 for size 2's on my gelding. Southern NH.
    mykidshavefourlegs.blogspot.com



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2009
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    4,908

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    There aren't any real cost standards. Location, farrier, and whim of the local market all play in. I think my farrier is the best we have (obviously, lol) but he's also one of the most affordable. I pay $145 for four, with two hind shoes drilled and tapped for studs.



  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
    Posts
    2,124

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    Thanks for all the replies. I meant to put location, but forgot. I'm in south-central Louisiana. So I would imagine we'd be on the lower end of the ranges.

    Quote Originally Posted by CatchMeIfUCan View Post
    Sounds like you need a better farrier - 24/7 turn out does not cause thrown shoes.
    This is the conclusion I'm coming to. I really like the farrier, but there have been several things (minor, but they're adding up) in the last couple months as the horse has been returned to a normal routine and not locked in a stall.

    Horse went from strict stall rest for ~7 months, had a transitory period of work on a longe line in a sand arena for several weeks, and then went to turnout. It wasn't until about a week or two into turnout that his feet started to fall apart. Horse used to be turned out and never had an issue before. We also ended up pulling the front shoes on my old Morgan a couple trims ago because he kept pulling them (also, never had an issue before).

    How much of a chance do I give the farrier before finding someone new? I feel like every time I say "that has never been a problem before", I'm blown off with a "well, it's probably his diet/turnout/age/full moon". And I understand his hesitation to believe me, as I'm sure he gets that from every horse owner having a problem. But the price thing is really annoying me. I was ok paying $200 when there was a significant hoof issue that required expertise to fix, but the horse is healed now and I'm still paying $200. And the horse is now throwing shoes 3-4 weeks after a new set has been put on. I could handle 6, but not half that.



  8. #28
    Join Date
    May. 10, 2001
    Location
    NW Washington
    Posts
    1,038

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    $40/front shoes and $55 for all 4. Not that I've ever complained, but I certainly won't now!


    1 members found this post helpful.

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jan. 18, 2007
    Location
    Heaven on Earth--Sonoma County, CA
    Posts
    1,404

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    My guy, who is excellent, is $50 to trim a barefoot horse, $140-$160 for fronts only (he charges more for big drafts and crosses), and $200-$240 for all 4. We generally do the horses on a six week schedule, barring the occasional lost show or conflicting show date.

    I once, in another part of the world, paid $500 every 4 weeks to put a crappy footed horse to rights. I cried every time I wrote that check, but in a year he went from crappy, to great footed, and we went back to a regular farrier. When I sold him 2 years later, the PPE made note of his excellent feet.

    The issue isn't the price, it's that the work he's doing isn't working. Great farrier work is priceless. Poor farrier work is expensive at any price.
    Phoenix Farm ~ Breeding-Training-Sales
    Eventing, Dressage, Young Horses
    www.phoenixsporthorses.com
    Check out my new blog: http://califcountrymom.blogspot.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Nov. 1, 2008
    Location
    NY
    Posts
    948

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixFarm View Post

    The issue isn't the price, it's that the work he's doing isn't working. Great farrier work is priceless. Poor farrier work is expensive at any price.
    My thoughts exactly. If the shoes aren't staying on, then the price is irrelevant.
    JB-Infinity Farm
    www.infinitehorses.com


    1 members found this post helpful.

  11. #31
    Join Date
    Apr. 9, 2012
    Location
    NYC=center of the universe
    Posts
    1,876

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    $300.

    There really is a farrier mafia around these parts. Only kinda kidding. I'm happy to pay that for a journeyman farrier. The journeyman farrier and my BO parted company so his protege took the work over. For the same price. Thankfully he's pretty good. But I find it insulting when I compare his rate to my own.
    Born under a rock and owned by beasts!



  12. #32
    Join Date
    Jul. 15, 2006
    Location
    VA
    Posts
    755

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    $80 for 4 steel shoes. I think the biggest problem is losing the shoes, 3 out of 4 in a month is a bit much. Mine is turned out 24/7 and keeps hers on (usually) for 6 weeks until the farrier comes back. She might lose an occasional shoe, (RH) but that happens maybe twice a year and only when she is in heavy work.
    Railgirl.blogspot.com



  13. #33
    Join Date
    Apr. 2, 2013
    Location
    Denver, CO
    Posts
    38

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    $140 for fronts with clips and basic backs. Although my farrier told me last time that his accountant told him if he didn't raise prices, he should just get a job at McDonald's to support his shoeing habit

    CO weather seems to be very hard on feet, but Fawkes still manages to go 7-8 weeks between replacement. Sorry you are having trouble. I wouldn't wait to change if you can find somebody else reputable in the area



  14. #34
    Join Date
    Jan. 6, 2013
    Posts
    280

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    $200 for 4 shoes regardless of type.



  15. #35
    Join Date
    Sep. 13, 2002
    Location
    Pacific Northwest
    Posts
    4,805

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    Wow, seeing these figures is making me feel like I'm getting a deal! Interesting range.


    1 members found this post helpful.

  16. #36
    Join Date
    May. 24, 2013
    Location
    North Los Angeles
    Posts
    50

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    $90-$100 all 4 shoes with wedges and clips. Paid up to $250 for High Dollar shoer who was actually not as great.



  17. #37
    Join Date
    Dec. 19, 2012
    Posts
    518

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    Not sure what your turnout situation has to do with it? 12 hours isn't that much and won't disintegrate your horse's hooves. Anyway, I'm just outside of DC: 4 regular shoes ranges from $170-195. This is based off of speaking with several different farriers and horse friends at barns locally to me. If there are any extras needed you better believe those will be tacked onto the price. It is not uncommon for those folks to pay $200+ every 4-5 weeks.



  18. #38
    Join Date
    Jan. 21, 2010
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    2,124

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    Quote Originally Posted by PhoenixFarm View Post
    The issue isn't the price, it's that the work he's doing isn't working. Great farrier work is priceless. Poor farrier work is expensive at any price.
    I appreciate that reminder. I was just hoping I could find another reason to "break up" with him instead of "you saved my horse's life, but now that he's back to his normal life, the work you're doing sucks".

    He came out last night to re-shoe the horse. Again, I was not impressed. He drew blood from all 4 soles. Not substantial or dripping, but enough that I was able to spot it while holding onto the horse's head. Is that normal?? I've never seen it, but then again I'm never watching over my farrier's shoulder like I have been lately. He blamed the poor feet on the horse being a "warmblood with bad warmblood feet" (horse is a TB, but is a giant tank like a warmblood). Also chastised me for not pulling the shoes or tacking them back on (what? horse owners do this? I can probably pull them, but not tighten them!) when I noticed they were loose; said it "ruined" the feet. I see his point, but by the time I noticed the shoes were loose and put it on my "to do list", the horse threw them that day.

    I'm going to ask around for another farrier, but as I understand, it's pretty slim pickings, especially finding one that will travel to my place since I'm not at a huge barn. I'm worried I'm going to be farrier-hopping, and as you all know, it's a small community.



  19. #39
    Join Date
    Jul. 17, 2005
    Location
    Atlanta, GA
    Posts
    532

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    I'm sorry, but WTF!? Drew blood from all FOUR feet!? I can see maybe trimming one a little too much.

    I'd be done at that point.
    Pisgah: 2000 AHHA (Holsteiner x TB) Mare (lower level eventing, with a focus on dressage)

    Darcy: 7? year old Border Collie x Rottweiler? Drama Queen extraordinaire, rescued from the pound in Jan 2010


    1 members found this post helpful.

  20. #40
    Join Date
    Feb. 1, 2012
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    4,496

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    Wow...after seeing some of these prices, I would make it a specific criteria when buying a horse that they were 100% sound and ready to rumble barefoot!
    "If you think nobody cares about you, try missing a couple payments..."


    1 members found this post helpful.

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