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  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec. 4, 2002
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    2,544

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    As a seller, if someone is looking at a horse I have that is above their price range, it is helpful if in the initial telephone call the buyer establishes what they can spend--then I can tell them if it is worth their while to consider the horse, or if there is no chance that I can come down that low on the price.
    I quite often build in ten percent for negotiating in the price, although lately I've had a couple of lower priced horses that I have not done that with. Usually the lower priced the horse, the more firm my price is going to be, and the less negotiating room there will be. Reason: The horse is only worth so much, and if I add in to provide negotiating room, it prices the horse out of the range where it belongs. I am interested in pricing the horse fairly, I am interested in selling the horse, but I am not interested in losing on the sale. So, you can always make me an offer, and because this is my business, you won't offend me. But I will not guarantee to take your offer.



  2. #22
    Join Date
    Oct. 25, 2008
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    2,233

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    As a buyer of things, I would never reveal to a seller the top end of my budget... If I say $10k on an $8k horse, well there goes my leverage........

    Conversely, as a seller of things, I positively HATE it when buyers ask me, "what's the lowest you'll take?" or "what's your bottom line?" (Uhm, well, now that you ask, for YOU? Full price!) If I was going to reveal my bottom line, I'd have put that in the ad and said FIRM. Why on earth would I tell a seller that my bottom line on my $5k horse is $3k if they would have been willing to buy him for $4k?!?!

    I don't think there's a single thing wrong with asking a seller at the initial phone call, "is the price firm or negotiable?" At least then you'll know, and no one's time is wasted.
    *friend of bar.ka

    "Evidently, I am an unrepentant b*tch, possible trouble maker, and all around super villian"


    1 members found this post helpful.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun. 9, 2012
    Posts
    134

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    I've bought two horses, and each time offered full price, but asked for something in return. In once case, it was saddle and bridle; in the other, it was a month's board and a trim (owner was a farrier). Both offers cheerfully accepted.



  4. #24
    Join Date
    Aug. 25, 2007
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    9,012

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    Quote Originally Posted by cnvh View Post
    As a buyer of things, I would never reveal to a seller the top end of my budget... If I say $10k on an $8k horse, well there goes my leverage........

    Conversely, as a seller of things, I positively HATE it when buyers ask me, "what's the lowest you'll take?" or "what's your bottom line?" (Uhm, well, now that you ask, for YOU? Full price!) If I was going to reveal my bottom line, I'd have put that in the ad and said FIRM. Why on earth would I tell a seller that my bottom line on my $5k horse is $3k if they would have been willing to buy him for $4k?!?!

    I don't think there's a single thing wrong with asking a seller at the initial phone call, "is the price firm or negotiable?" At least then you'll know, and no one's time is wasted.
    Very well said.

    If a buyer has done their due diligence and investigated a market then they will know from the first look at a seller's ad whether or not the seller is realistic. Sellers who are asking multiples of a horse's present market value are going to be difficult to deal with. I'm not sure I'd bother. Unrealistic sellers have easily bruised egos.

    Conversely, if a seller has taken to time to survey the market and price their horse realistically at its present it's fair for them to be a bit put off by a buyer who is "bottom fishing." When asked "what's your bottom dollar price?" I reply "what's your top dollar offer; don't ask me to bid against myself!" Most of the time this produces a reasonable response. Sometimes it doesn't.

    Notice that I've twice emphasized present value. That is what the market today will value a horse. It does not matter how much "the seller has in it" or how much the buyer's daddy used to pay or any other such irrelevant thoughts.

    The equine market, today, is a pale shadow of what it was five years ago. At the very elite levels there has been recovery, but for pleasure horses not so much at all. Buyers and sellers have to be cognizant of that fact.

    In general, right now, it's a buyer's market. The world is awash in horses that were produced during those recent good times and are now languishing in pastures. A quick look at the "give away" pages in this Forum will prove that beyond any rational argument.

    G.
    Mangalarga Marchador: Uma Raça, Uma Paixão



  5. #25
    Join Date
    Oct. 9, 2000
    Location
    California
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    8,264

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    Quote Originally Posted by Guilherme View Post
    In general, right now, it's a buyer's market. The world is awash in horses that were produced during those recent good times and are now languishing in pastures. A quick look at the "give away" pages in this Forum will prove that beyond any rational argument.

    G.
    Well, yes and no - it depends on your requirements, of course. Yes, there are a lot of horses out there whom people would like to sell or give away or free lease or whatever. But how many of them fit what I need for DH? That's the hard part! It must be an exceptional horse to come home and be a good fit for Mr. PoPo and fit in my budget.

    Buying horses is always fun . . . when you're shopping for someone else (not in your family!). But when it is time for you to buy for yourself . . . what a headache!!!
    My Mustang Adventures - Mac, my mustang | Annwylid D'Lite - my Cob filly

    "A horse's face always conveys clearly whether it is loved by its owner or simply used." - Anja Beran



  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug. 17, 2004
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    Rixeyville, VA
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    6,605

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    I'd qualify that comment that the market depends on what you are looking for. As I said in an earlier post, I sell an uncommon breed that is not readily available in my region. It's also a breed that typically sells on average in the $5 - $10K range depending on training, experience, etc. This year I have sold one horse to a buyer on the internet. She never even tried the horse nor had a PPE done! She bought within 24 hours and had her shipped. She is thrilled with the mare. I sold a consignment to a lady that tried him one day, made an offer the next, had a PPE done two days later, and had him delivered that weekend. She needed to sell a horse she had but didn't want to take a chance that this guy would gone. Right now I have a customer coming to look at 4 geldings with the intention of buying as many as 3 of them. I also just heard from my lowball buyer -- she wants to pay full asking price for the mare I was firm about. Maybe it's a buyer's market, but I have more interest than I have suitable horses to sell. I'll be down to young stock if all the sales go through. My guess is that I won't sell that many horses, but Fjord sales are doing fine these days.
    Where Norwegian Fjords Rule
    http://www.ironwood-farm.com



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